The Tennessee ClipArt gallery includes 14 illustrations related to the State of Tennessee.

Color illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee. This flag was in use from July 04, 1818 until July 3, 1819.

20 Star United States Flag, 1818

Color illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of Indiana,…

Black line illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee. This flag was in use from July 04, 1818 until July 3, 1819.

20 Star United States Flag, 1818

Black line illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of…

An illustration of Memphis, Tennessee's Cotton Carnival, which consisted of a series of parties and festivities staged annually since 1931 in Memphis, TN by the centralized Carnival Mephis associated and its member krewes during the month of June. Carnival salutes various aspects of Memphis and its industries, and is reigned over by the current year's secretly selected King, Queen, and Royal Court of Carnival.

Memphis Cotton Carnival

An illustration of Memphis, Tennessee's Cotton Carnival, which consisted of a series of parties and…

An illustration of a college set upon a hill in Knoxville, TN and a paddle boat.

College

An illustration of a college set upon a hill in Knoxville, TN and a paddle boat.

"Cumberland Gap and Heights, Tenn., from the Kentucky side. Cumberland Gap was a place of such importance during the war as to be constantly the object of operations on both sides, who indeed alternately held it. Like Harper's Ferry, it was deemed a strategic point of great value; but the fact that no action took place, and that its evacuation was compelled by distinct movements, tend to modify this idea. It is a natural gap in a mountain, 80 miles long, or rather the only natural gap, although other points bear that name. Cumberland Gap is 150 miles southeast of Lexington, Ky. The mountain is here 1,200 feet high, but the notch is a cut nearly two-thirds of this, the road through the gap being only 400 feet high. On the southern or Tennessee side this mountain is abrupt, and in some places perpendicular, and the summit almost inaccessible, except through the gap. The northern or Kentucky side is more irregular, breaking off in a sucession of smaller mountains and hills to the Valley of the Cumberland. Our sketch shows the Kentucky side."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Cumberland Gap

"Cumberland Gap and Heights, Tenn., from the Kentucky side. Cumberland Gap was a place of such importance…

The place where Andrew Jackson was buried in Nashville, Tennessee.

The Hermitage in 1861

The place where Andrew Jackson was buried in Nashville, Tennessee.

An illustration depicting iron furnaces located in Rockwood, Tennessee.

Iron Furnaces

An illustration depicting iron furnaces located in Rockwood, Tennessee.

Island Number Ten was a former island in the Mississippi River near Tiptonville, Tennessee and the site of a major eponymous battle in the American Civil War.

Island Number Ten

Island Number Ten was a former island in the Mississippi River near Tiptonville, Tennessee and the site…

The tomb of Andrew Jackson, in The Hermitage in Nashville, Tennessee.

Jackson's Tomb

The tomb of Andrew Jackson, in The Hermitage in Nashville, Tennessee.

An illustration of a sculpture of Andrew Jackson located in Memphis, Tennessee's city park.

Andrew Jackson

An illustration of a sculpture of Andrew Jackson located in Memphis, Tennessee's city park.

A cityscape of Knoxville, Tennessee during 1863.

Knoxville

A cityscape of Knoxville, Tennessee during 1863.

General Lafayette at the Hermitage, the home of Andrew Jackson.

Lafayette at the Hermitage

General Lafayette at the Hermitage, the home of Andrew Jackson.

Recapture of artillery by the First Ohio and other regiments under General Rousseau, April 7, 1862. The flight of the 53rd and 57th Ohio Regiments left Waterhouse's battery, which was planted on a hill to the left of Shiloh Chapel, unprotected; but the 43rd and 49th Illinois Regiments came to his aid, and supported it until Colonel Wreish of the 43rd was killed, when they fell back in tolerable order. The Confederates now charged and took Waterhouse's battery, thus flanking General Sherman, who fell back to the Purdy Road in good order. Here the sudden death of Captain Behr, who was getting his battery in position on the left wing of the new line, created a panic in his company, which broke and left five guns. Not being supported by any other division, General Sherman was forced back to the right of McClernand, where he again formed and shared the fortunes of the day.

Battle of Pittsburg Landing

Recapture of artillery by the First Ohio and other regiments under General Rousseau, April 7, 1862.…

The tomb of President Polk in Nashville, Tennessee.

Polk's Tomb

The tomb of President Polk in Nashville, Tennessee.

An illustration depicting the Tennessee River.

Tennessee River

An illustration depicting the Tennessee River.

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday, April 6th, 1862- Forty-Fourth Indiana Volunteers engaged. The right wing of General Hurlbut's division stopped the advance of the Confederates by a determined defense along a side road leading through the woods on the right of the field. The Twenty-fifth and Seventeenth Kentucky and Forty-fourth and Thirty-first Indiana Regiments were engaged. By some means the dry leaves and thick underbrush which covered this locality took fire, filling the woods with volumes of smoke, and only discovering the position of the opposing forces to each other by the unceasing rattle of musketry and the whizzing of the bullets." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Shiloh

"Battle of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, left wing- the woods on fire during the engagement of Sunday,…

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Tennessee Confederacy Stamp (5 cent) from 1861

Tennessee Confederacy Five Cent Stamp, 1861

Tennessee Confederacy Stamp (5 cent) from 1861

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Tennessee in 1889.

Tennessee

The official seal of the U.S. state of Tennessee in 1889.

The state banner of Tennessee, the volunteer state.

Tennessee

The state banner of Tennessee, the volunteer state.

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1876

Tennessee seal

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1876

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1876

Tennessee seal

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1876

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1890

Tennessee seal

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1890

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1904

Tennessee seal

Seal of the state of Tennessee, 1904

The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee. The seal shows images such as wheat and a plow to represent agriculture and a boat to symbolize commerce.

Seal of Tennessee

The Great Seal of the State of Tennessee. The seal shows images such as wheat and a plow to represent…

Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States Congressman from Tennessee, officer in the United States Army, and a Confederate brigadier general during the American Civil War. He led the first Confederate invasion of neutral Kentucky and was killed in action at the Battle of Mill Springs, the first Confederate general to perish in the Western Theater.

Felix Kirk Zollicoffer

Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States…