The Human Appendicular Skeleton ClipArt gallery offers 31 illustrations of arms, hands, pelvis, legsa and feet. These are the bones that are appended to the axial or central skeleton.

Arm of humans; h Humerus or bone of upper arm; r and u Radius and Ulna, or bones of the forearm; c Carpus, or bones of the wrist; m Metacarpus, or bones of the root of the hand; p Phalanges, or bones of the fingers.

Bones of Arm

Arm of humans; h Humerus or bone of upper arm; r and u Radius and Ulna, or bones of the forearm; c Carpus,…

The collar bone of a human.

Clavicle

The collar bone of a human.

"When a bone is broken, blood trickles out between the incjured parts, and afterwards gives place to a sticky, watery fluid, which gradually becomes thicker, like a syrup or jelly. This is slowly replaced by a new bone structure and forms a kind of cement to gold together the broken ends." — Blaisedell, 1904

Broken Clavicle

"When a bone is broken, blood trickles out between the incjured parts, and afterwards gives place to…

"Across the middle ear a chain of three small bones stretches from the tympanic membrane to the inner ear. These bones are called from their shape the <em>malleus</em> (hammer), the <em>incus</em> (anvil), and the <em>stapes</em> (stirrup)." — Ritchie, 1918

Bones of the Ear

"Across the middle ear a chain of three small bones stretches from the tympanic membrane to the inner…

"The <em>femur</em>, or thigh bone, the largest and heaviest bone in the body, reaches from the hip to the knee. It has a rounded head, which fits into the cuplike cavity in the hip bone which has already been mentioned." &mdash; Blaisedell, 1904

Femur

"The femur, or thigh bone, the largest and heaviest bone in the body, reaches from the hip…

"The Right Femur sawed in Two Lengthwise." — Blaisedell, 1904

Cross Section of a Femur

"The Right Femur sawed in Two Lengthwise." — Blaisedell, 1904

Fracture of the neck of the femur within the capsular ligament.

Fractured Femur

Fracture of the neck of the femur within the capsular ligament.

Fracture of the neck of the femur below trochanters.

Fractured Femur

Fracture of the neck of the femur below trochanters.

Fracture of the neck of the femur above condyles.

Fractured Femur

Fracture of the neck of the femur above condyles.

"The Fibula tied into a Knot after the Mineral Matter has been dissolved by Acid." &mdash; Blaisedell, 1904

Softened fibula

"The Fibula tied into a Knot after the Mineral Matter has been dissolved by Acid." — Blaisedell,…

Human skeleton of a finger.

Finger

Human skeleton of a finger.

"The bones are fastened together, kept in place, and their movements limited, by tough and strong bands, or straps, called <em>ligaments</em>, from a word meaning to bind." — Blaisedell, 1904

Ligaments of the Foot and Ankle

"The bones are fastened together, kept in place, and their movements limited, by tough and strong bands,…

"The foot is built in the form of a half-dome or half-arch. This is to afford a broad, strong support surface for the support of the weight of the body. The bones of the toes and the heel form the piers, while the little bones wedged in between the metatarsal bones and the heel make up the keystone of the arch. This arch gives a certain amount of spring and elasticity to the feet, and hence it is of the upmost importance in preventing jars and jolts." — Blaisedell, 1904

Bones of the Foot

"The foot is built in the form of a half-dome or half-arch. This is to afford a broad, strong support…

"The Foot is that part of the lower extremity below the leg on which we stand and walk. It is composed of three series of groups of bones&ndash; the tarsal, or hindermost; the metatarsal, which occupy the middle portion; and the phalanges, which form the toes.The tarsal bones are seven in number. The metatarsal bones are five in number. The phalanges are 14 in number, three to each toe, except the great one, which has only two."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Side View of Bones in Foot

"The Foot is that part of the lower extremity below the leg on which we stand and walk. It is composed…

"The Foot is that part of the lower extremity below the leg on which we stand and walk. It is composed of three series of groups of bones&ndash; the tarsal, or hindermost; the metatarsal, which occupy the middle portion; and the phalanges, which form the toes.The tarsal bones are seven in number. The metatarsal bones are five in number. The phalanges are 14 in number, three to each toe, except the great one, which has only two."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Side View of Bones in Foot

"The Foot is that part of the lower extremity below the leg on which we stand and walk. It is composed…

This diagram shows the bones of the right fore-arm. H, the humerus; R, the radius; and U, the ulna.

Forearm Bones

This diagram shows the bones of the right fore-arm. H, the humerus; R, the radius; and U, the ulna.

This diagram shows the bones of the hand and of the wrist.

Hand

This diagram shows the bones of the hand and of the wrist.

"The bones are fastened together, kept in place, and their movements limited, by tough and strong bands, or straps called <em>ligaments</em>, from a word meaning to bind." — Blaisedell, 1904

Powerful Ligament at the Hip Joint

"The bones are fastened together, kept in place, and their movements limited, by tough and strong bands,…

"The <em>humerus</em>, a long, hollow bone, rests against a shallow socket on the shoulder blade. It is joined at the elbow to the bones of the forearm." &mdash; Blaisedell, 1904

Humerus

"The humerus, a long, hollow bone, rests against a shallow socket on the shoulder blade. It…

"A, symphysis menti; B, angle of jaw; C, body or horizontal ramus; D, coronoid process; E, ascending ramus; F, condyle; the teeth inserted along the alveolar border. The concave line between D and F is the condyloid notch." -Century, 1889

Lower Jawbone of Man

"A, symphysis menti; B, angle of jaw; C, body or horizontal ramus; D, coronoid process; E, ascending…

"Showing how the Ends of the Bones are shaped to form the Elbow Joint. The cut ends of a few ligaments are seen." — Blaisedell, 1904

Elbow Joint

"Showing how the Ends of the Bones are shaped to form the Elbow Joint. The cut ends of a few ligaments…

The elbow has a simple hinge joint. Tendons attach muscle to bones.

Elbow Joint

The elbow has a simple hinge joint. Tendons attach muscle to bones.

The right knee-joint, laid open from the front. 1: Articular surface of the femur. 2 and 3: Ligaments. 4: Insertion of one of these ligaments into the tibia. 6 and 7: Internal and external cartilages. 8: Ligament of the patella.

Knee-Joint

The right knee-joint, laid open from the front. 1: Articular surface of the femur. 2 and 3: Ligaments.…

Front view of the right knee-joint. 1: Tendon of the extensor muscle. 2: Patella. 3: Ligament of the patella, or trendinous insertion of the muscle just mentioned. 4: Capsular ligament. 5 and 6: Internal and external lateral ligaments.

Knee-Joint

Front view of the right knee-joint. 1: Tendon of the extensor muscle. 2: Patella. 3: Ligament of the…

Fracture of the patella.

Fractured Patella

Fracture of the patella.

"When a bone is broken, blood trickles out between the injured parts, and afterwards gives place to a sticky, watery fluid, which gradually becomes thicker, like a syrup or jelly. This is slowly replaced by a new bone structure and forms a kind of cement to gold together the broken ends." — Blaisedell, 1904

Broken Radius

"When a bone is broken, blood trickles out between the injured parts, and afterwards gives place to…

"The <em>shoulder-blade</em> is a large, flat, three-sided bone, which is placed on the upper and back part of the chest. On the outer side it has a saucerlike cavity on which the rounded head of the arm bone rests." &mdash; Blaisedell, 1904

Scapula

"The shoulder-blade is a large, flat, three-sided bone, which is placed on the upper and back…

"The <em>leg</em> consists, like the forearm, of two bones. The larger, a strong, three-sided bone with a sharp edge in front, is called the <em>tibia</em>. It is commonly known as the shin bone. The smaller bone, bound at both ends to the tibia, as a pin is to a brooch, is called the <em>fibula</em>, meaning a buckle or clasp. It is a long, slender bone on the outside of the leg, and is lower end forms the outer ankle." — Blaisedell, 1904

Tibia and Fibula

"The leg consists, like the forearm, of two bones. The larger, a strong, three-sided bone with…

"When a bone is broken, blood trickles out between the injured parts, and afterwards gives place to a sticky, watery fluid, which gradually becomes thicker, like a syrup or jelly. This is slowly replaced by a new bone structure and forms a kind of cement to gold together the broken ends." — Blaisedell, 1904

Broken Tibia

"When a bone is broken, blood trickles out between the injured parts, and afterwards gives place to…

"The <em>ulna</em>, or elbow bone, is the larger of these two bones. It is joined to the humerus by a hinge joint at the elbow. It is on the same side as the little finger. The <em>radius</em>, queerly named because it is supposed to resemble one of the spokes of a wheel, is the long, slightly curved, outer bone fo the forearm. It is on the same side as the thumb. Its upper end is fastened both to the ulna and the humerus." — Blaisedell, 1904

Ulna and Radius

"The ulna, or elbow bone, is the larger of these two bones. It is joined to the humerus by…

The bone extending from the elbow to the wrist on the side opposite to the thumb.

Human Ulna

The bone extending from the elbow to the wrist on the side opposite to the thumb.