The Lighthouses ClipArt gallery offers 28 views of lighthouses along with the instruments and lenses they contain.

"Beacons in exposed situations are constructed sometimes of stone, and cement-concrete or cement-rubble, but generally of castiron columns let into heavy base plates which are fixed to the rock by strong lewis bats. The small class iron beacons are generally of malleable iron and the larger of cast-iron butt steel or bronze might with advantage be used in very exposed places." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Beacon

"Beacons in exposed situations are constructed sometimes of stone, and cement-concrete or cement-rubble,…

"First Application of Total Reflexion to Fixed Lights. In this apparatus Fresnel substituted his totally reflecting prism p and lens R for Marcet's reflector, and thus distributed the whole light equally over the horizon by means of dioptric agents alone. This was the first application of total reflexion to lighthouse apparatus, and this beautiful instrument continues till now in universal use." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Dioptric Light

"First Application of Total Reflexion to Fixed Lights. In this apparatus Fresnel substituted his totally…

"Dioptric Floating Light. Elevation." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Dioptric Light

"Dioptric Floating Light. Elevation." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Dioptric Floating Light. Horizontal Section." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Dioptric Light

"Dioptric Floating Light. Horizontal Section." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Section of Eddystone Light-house." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Eddystone Light-house

"Section of Eddystone Light-house." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

"aa is the mast, b tackle hook, c, c brass flanges for fixing parts of lantern together, e and g weather guards, h plate glass front of lantern, i shutter by which lamps are trimmed, k lamps, l silver reflector. Revolving catoptric apparatus was applied to floating lights in England, and M. Letourneau, in 1851, proposed to employ a number of sets of dioptric apparatus in one lantern." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Floating Lights

"aa is the mast, b tackle hook, c, c brass flanges for fixing parts of lantern together, e and g weather…

Distant view of Fort Niagra. This view is from the west side of the Niagra River, near the light-house. The fort is on the east side (right side of the picture), at the mouth of the river. The steam-boat seen in the distance is out on Lake Ontario.

Fort Niagra

Distant view of Fort Niagra. This view is from the west side of the Niagra River, near the light-house.…

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded by annular lenses L, and a compound arrangement of inclined trapezoidal lenses L' and plane silvered mirrors M. The inclined lenses fit closely to each other and form a pyramidal dome, and the light, intercepted by them, is sent upwards in inclined beams until, falling upon the plane mirrors M, it is sent outwards in horizontal parallelized beams. All these optical agents are made to revolve round the central lamp, and the sailor receives a full flash when the axis of one of the emerging beams passes his eye, and as soon as it passes him he is in darkness until the next beam comes round." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Fresnels Revolving Light

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded…

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded by annular lenses L, and a compound arrangement of inclined trapezoidal lenses L' and plane silvered mirrors M. The inclined lenses fit closely to each other and form a pyramidal dome, and the light, intercepted by them, is sent upwards in inclined beams until, falling upon the plane mirrors M, it is sent outwards in horizontal parallelized beams. All these optical agents are made to revolve round the central lamp, and the sailor receives a full flash when the axis of one of the emerging beams passes his eye, and as soon as it passes him he is in darkness until the next beam comes round." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Fresnels Revolving Light

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded…

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded by annular lenses L, and a compound arrangement of inclined trapezoidal lenses L' and plane silvered mirrors M. The inclined lenses fit closely to each other and form a pyramidal dome, and the light, intercepted by them, is sent upwards in inclined beams until, falling upon the plane mirrors M, it is sent outwards in horizontal parallelized beams. All these optical agents are made to revolve round the central lamp, and the sailor receives a full flash when the axis of one of the emerging beams passes his eye, and as soon as it passes him he is in darkness until the next beam comes round." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Fresnels Revolving Light

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded…

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded by annular lenses L, and a compound arrangement of inclined trapezoidal lenses L' and plane silvered mirrors M. The inclined lenses fit closely to each other and form a pyramidal dome, and the light, intercepted by them, is sent upwards in inclined beams until, falling upon the plane mirrors M, it is sent outwards in horizontal parallelized beams. All these optical agents are made to revolve round the central lamp, and the sailor receives a full flash when the axis of one of the emerging beams passes his eye, and as soon as it passes him he is in darkness until the next beam comes round." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Fresnels Revolving Light

"Fresnel's Revolving Light. —In this form of revolving light the central burner is surrounded…

"Holophotal Catadioptric Apparatus Revolving round a Central Flame.—If in place of Fresnel's compound arrangement of trapezoidal lenses and plane mirrors there are substituted mirrors R, R generated by the revolution of a parabolic profile round a horizontal axis, all the light will be at once sent out in parallel beams by them and the lenses L, and the apparatus is therefore geometrically perfect, but metallic instead of glass agents are still employed." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Holophotal Catadioptric

"Holophotal Catadioptric Apparatus Revolving round a Central Flame.—If in place of Fresnel's compound…

"Holophotal Fixed Light varied by Flashes.—Fresnel's double agents are here also dispensed with by the single agency of panels of fixed light apparatus p', p' and cylindrical refractors L', L', alternating with panels of holophotal apparatus p, p, L, L, both of which revolve together round the central burner." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Holophotal Light

"Holophotal Fixed Light varied by Flashes.—Fresnel's double agents are here also dispensed with…

An elevated structure or tower placed near a seaport or some headland for the purpose of protecting vessels at night by warning navigators of danger, and also serving as a general landmark.

Lighthouse

An elevated structure or tower placed near a seaport or some headland for the purpose of protecting…

Lighthouse in the water.

Lighthouse

Lighthouse in the water.

"An iron pile light erected at Haneda, in the Bay of Yedo, Japan." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Lighthouse

"An iron pile light erected at Haneda, in the Bay of Yedo, Japan." —The Encyclopedia Britannica,…

"A tower or other elevated structure bearing a light at the top and erected at the entrance of a harbor or on some rock or headland to serve as a guide or warning of danger to navigators at night." -Foster, 1921

Lighthouse

"A tower or other elevated structure bearing a light at the top and erected at the entrance of a harbor…

"Lighthouse, Tampa Bay, west coast of Florida."— Frank Leslie, 1896

lighthouse

"Lighthouse, Tampa Bay, west coast of Florida."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Lighthouse, Jupiter inlet, east coast of Florida."— Frank Leslie, 1896

lighthouse

"Lighthouse, Jupiter inlet, east coast of Florida."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Sackett's Harbor lighthouse was erected on Horse Island during the War of 1812.

Lighthouse on Horse Island

The Sackett's Harbor lighthouse was erected on Horse Island during the War of 1812.

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

Lighthouse, Black and White

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

Lighthouse, Color

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

"Eddystone is a group of gneiss rocks, daily submerged by the tide, in the English Channel, 9 miles off the Cornish coast, and 14 S.S.W. of Plymouth Breakwater. The frequent shipwrecks on these rocks led to the erection of a lighthouse on them in 1669-1700, but the great storm of Nov. 20, 1703 completely washed it away. Another lighthouse was built in 1706-1709. This was burned in 1755. The next, noted for its strength and the engineering skill displayed in it, was constructed in 1757-1759. The granite was dovetailed into the solid rock, and each block into its neighbors. As the rock in which this tower was built became undermined and greatly weakened by the action of the waves, the foundation of another was laid on a different part of the reef in 1879. Its light is visible in clear weather at a distance of 17 and one half miles."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Eddystone Lighthouse

"Eddystone is a group of gneiss rocks, daily submerged by the tide, in the English Channel, 9 miles…

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

Lighthouse, Outline

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

Lighthouse, Silhouette

This sign is used to indicate that a lighthouse is located nearby.

"Plane mirrors M revolve on an endless chain placed outside of the apparatus and alter the direction of the flashes after they pass into the dark arc on the landward side so as to cause the lenses L, L to repeat their flashes over the seaward are which requires strengthening. The condensing spherical mirror and mirror of unequal areas will also be found applicable in cases where the flashes do not require to sweep over the whole horizon." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Repeating Light

"Plane mirrors M revolve on an endless chain placed outside of the apparatus and alter the direction…

"In order to produce, on the catoptric system, a fixed light showing all round the circle, a number of reflectors are fixed round the outside of a stationary chandelier n. As the ordinary paraboloid has about 14 degrees of divergence, twenty-five reflectors were needed to light up continuously (though not equally) the whole horizon." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Revolving Light

"In order to produce, on the catoptric system, a fixed light showing all round the circle, a number…

"If again the light was to revolve, then a revolving chandelier was employed having a certain number of flat faces, on each of which was fixed a number separate lamps and reflectors with their axes parallel to each other. When the chandelier revolved, and one of the flat sides was turned towards the sailor, he would, when at some distance from the shore, receive a flash at once form each of the mirrors which were on that face, but when the face was turned away from him a dark period would intervene until the next face came round again." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Revolving Light

"If again the light was to revolve, then a revolving chandelier was employed having a certain number…