The United Kingdom Famous Persons ClipArt gallery includes 35 illustrations of royalty, prime ministers, ecclesiastical and military authorities, and other persons of note.

An illustration of the legend of Alfred the Great letting the cakes burn because he was preoccupied with thoughts of his kingdom.

Alfred the Great

An illustration of the legend of Alfred the Great letting the cakes burn because he was preoccupied…

The king of the southern Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex from 871 to 899. Alfred is famous for his defence of the kingdom against the Vikings.

Alfred the Great

The king of the southern Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex from 871 to 899. Alfred is famous for his defence…

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League. He also sat in the House of Commons from 1843 to 1889.

John Bright

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League. He also sat in the House of Commons from…

Prime Minister of Great Britain for a brief amount of time in 1827.

George Canning

Prime Minister of Great Britain for a brief amount of time in 1827.

The king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1660 to 1665.

Charles II

The king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1660 to 1665.

The 1st Earl of Chatham who led Britain during the Seven Years' War. He was the Prime Minister between 1766 and 1768.

William Pitt, Earl of Chatham

The 1st Earl of Chatham who led Britain during the Seven Years' War. He was the Prime Minister between…

Lord Clive was a British officer who established the military and political supremacy of the East India Company.

Robert Clive

Lord Clive was a British officer who established the military and political supremacy of the East India…

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League.

Robert Cobden

A British statesman who helped form the Anti-Corn Law League.

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881), was a British Conservative statesman and literary figure. He served in government for three decades, twice as Prime Minister. An Anglican, he was nonetheless the first and thus far only Prime Minister of Jewish heritage. Disraeli's greatest lasting achievement was the creation of the modern Conservative Party after the Corn Laws schism of 1846.

Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881), was a British Conservative…

A title of Peerage of the United Kingdom, created for the prominent Whig politician John Lambton. He authored the famous Durham Report, which is an important document in the history of Canada.

Earl of Durham

A title of Peerage of the United Kingdom, created for the prominent Whig politician John Lambton. He…

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327?) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. His tendency to ignore his nobility in favour of low-born favourites led to constant political unrest and his eventual deposition. Edward is perhaps best remembered for his supposed murder and his alleged homosexuality as well as being the first monarch to establish colleges in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge; he founded Cambridge's King's Hall in 1317 and gave Oxford's Oriel College its royal charter in 1326. Both colleges received the favour of Edward's son, Edward III, who confirmed Oriel's charter in 1327 and refounded King's Hall in 1337.

Edward II

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327?) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307…

Edward III was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. His fifty-year reign began when his father, Edward II of England killed. Edwards reign was marked by an expansion of English territory through wars in Scotland and France. Edward's parentage and his prodigious offspring provided the basis for two lengthy and significant events in European and British history, the Hundred Years' War and the Wars of the Roses, respectively.

Edward III

Edward III was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. His fifty-year reign began…

Elizabeth being carried on a gondola by eight men.

Elizabeth

Elizabeth being carried on a gondola by eight men.

Queen Elizabeth I of England going in state

Elizabeth I going in state

Queen Elizabeth I of England going in state

George I (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714 until his death, and ruler of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire from 1698. George was born in Lower Saxony in what is now Germany, and eventually inherited the title and lands of the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg. A succession of European wars expanded his German domains during his lifetime, and in 1708 he was ratified as Prince-elector of Hanover. During George's reign the powers of the monarchy diminished and Britain began a transition to the modern system of Cabinet government led by a Prime Minister. Towards the end of his reign, actual power was held by Sir Robert Walpole, Great Britain's first de facto Prime Minister. George died on a trip to his native Hanover, where he was buried.

King George I of Great Britain

George I (28 May 1660 – 11 June 1727) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1 August 1714…

The King of Great Britain and King of Ireland until their union in 1801. He continued his reign over the two countries until his death in 1820.

George III

The King of Great Britain and King of Ireland until their union in 1801. He continued his reign over…

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror, the first King of England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. He succeeded his elder brother William II as King of England in 1100 and defeated his eldest brother, Robert Curthose, to become Duke of Normandy in 1106. He was called Beauclerc for his scholarly interests and Lion of Justice for refinements which he brought about in the rudimentary administrative and legislative machinery of the time.

Henry the First

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror, the first…

All this time John Lacklands cruelty and savageness were making the whole kingdom miserable; and at last the great barons bear it no longer. They met together and agreed that they would make John swear to govern by the good old English laws that had prevailed before the Normans came. The difficulty was to be sure of what these laws were, for most of the copies of them had been lost. However, Archbishop Langton and some of the wisest of the barons put together a set of laws-some copied, some recollected, some old, some new-but all such as to give the barons some control of the king, and hinder him from getting savage soldiers together to frighten people into doing whatever he chose to make them. These laws they called Magna Charta, or the great charter; and they all came in armor, and took John by surprise at Windsor. He came to meet them in a meadow named Runnymede, on the bank of the Thames, and there they force him to sign the charter, for which all Englishmen are grateful to them.

John's Anger after Signing Magna Charta

All this time John Lacklands cruelty and savageness were making the whole kingdom miserable; and at…

An illustration of King Charles wearing a rather large neck tie.

King Charles

An illustration of King Charles wearing a rather large neck tie.

Mary, the fourth and penultimate monarch of the Tudor dynasty, is remembered for returning England from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. To this end, she had almost three hundred religious dissenters executed; as a consequence, she is often known as Bloody Mary. Her religious policies, however, were in many cases reversed by her successor and half-sister, Elizabeth I. Mary Tudor was a cousin, once removed, of Mary, Queen of Scots, with whom she is often confused by those unfamiliar with British history.

Mary I

Mary, the fourth and penultimate monarch of the Tudor dynasty, is remembered for returning England from…

Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 19 July 1553 until her death. The fourth crowned monarch of the Tudor dynasty, she is remembered for restoring England to Roman Catholicism after succeeding her short-lived half brother, Edward VI, to the English throne. In the process, she had almost 300 religious dissenters burned at the stake in the Marian Persecutions, earning her the sobriquet of "Bloody Mary". Her re-establishment of Roman Catholicism was reversed by her successor and half-sister, Elizabeth I.

Mary I of England

Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 19…

A British flag officer who is well known for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar.

Horatio Nelson

A British flag officer who is well known for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar.

The death mask of Sir Isaac Newton, who discovered the law of gravitation.

Death Mask of Sir Isaac Newton

The death mask of Sir Isaac Newton, who discovered the law of gravitation.

Frederick North was the Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782. He led Great Britain through most of the American Revolutionary War.

Lord North

Frederick North was the Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782. He led Great Britain through…

Odo of Bayeux (c. 1036 – February 1097, Palermo), Norman bishop and English earl, was the half-brother of William the Conqueror, and was for a time second only to the king in power in England.

Odo of Bayeux

Odo of Bayeux (c. 1036 – February 1097, Palermo), Norman bishop and English earl, was the half-brother…

William II (c. 1056 – 2 August 1100), the third son of William I of England (William the Conqueror), was King of England from 1087 until 1100, with powers also over Normandy, and influence in Scotland. He was less successful in extending control into Wales. William is commonly known as 'William Rufus', perhaps because of his red-faced appearance. Although William was an effective soldier, he was a ruthless ruler and, it seems, was little liked by those he governed: according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he was 'hated by almost all his people.'

William Rufus

William II (c. 1056 – 2 August 1100), the third son of William I of England (William the Conqueror),…

A title in the Peerage of England, which was created for Anthony Ashley Cooper.

The Earl of Shaftesbury

A title in the Peerage of England, which was created for Anthony Ashley Cooper.

Charles Spencer and Sarah Churchill, Duke an Duchess of Marlborough

Charles Spencer

Charles Spencer and Sarah Churchill, Duke an Duchess of Marlborough

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was from 20 June 1837 the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and from 1 May 1876 the first Empress of India of the British Raj until her death. Her reign as the Queen lasted 63 years and seven months, longer than that of any other British monarch before or (as of 2009) since. The period centered on her reign is known as the Victorian era, a time of industrial, political, and military progress within the United Kingdom.

Queen Victoria

Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was from 20 June 1837 the Queen…

"Queen Victoria as a young woman."—Myers, 1905

Queen Victoria

"Queen Victoria as a young woman."—Myers, 1905

A British statesman who is generally known as the first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

Sir Robert Walpole

A British statesman who is generally known as the first Prime Minister of Great Britain.

The first holder of the title was Arthur Wellesley, who defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo.

Duke of Wellington

The first holder of the title was Arthur Wellesley, who defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo.

William the Conqueror landing in England.

William

William the Conqueror landing in England.

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697 and 1755. When he came to the Isle of Man, he found the buildings of the diocese in a ruinous condition. The building of new churches was one of his first acts, and he eventually rebuilt most of the churches of the diocese along with establishing public libraries. Wilson worked to restore ecclesiastical discipline on the island, although he clashed with civil authorities partly because of the reduction of revenue from Wilson mitigating fines in the spiritual court.

Bishop Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697…

A British Army officer known for his victory over the French in Canada during the early 18th century.

James Wolfe

A British Army officer known for his victory over the French in Canada during the early 18th century.