The United Kingdom Churches and Cathedrals ClipArt gallery offers 139 images of UK places of worship.

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades in the 12th century the church was renamed St. Edmund and the Holy Sepulchre, in reference to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The name eventually became contracted to St Sepulchre.

St. Sepulchre's, Cambridge

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades…

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a parish church in the Church of England. It is often known simply as Shakespeare's Church, due to its fame as the place of baptism and burial of William Shakespeare. The present building dates from 1210 and is built on the site of a Saxon monastery. It is Stratford's oldest building, in a striking position on the banks of the River Avon, and has long been England's most visited parish church.

Stratford-on-Avon Church

The Collegiate Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon is a parish church in the…

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River Wye in Monmouthshire, it was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. The present-day remains of Tintern are a mixture of building works covering a 400-year period between 1136 and 1536. Very little remains of the first buildings; a few sections of walling are incorporated into later buildings and the two recessed cupboards for books on the east of the cloisters are from this period.

Tintern Abbey, Cisternian

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on May 9, 1131. Situated on the River…

"Saxon Architecture was the style of architecture in use in England from the time of its conversion till the Conquest. It is easily recognized by its massive columns and semicircular arches, which usually spring from capitals without the intervention of the entablature."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Tower in Northamptonshire, England

"Saxon Architecture was the style of architecture in use in England from the time of its conversion…

The transept is the area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building in Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architecture.

Transept of the Martyrdom at Canterbury Cathedral

The transept is the area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building in Romanesque…

Valle Crucis Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Glyn y Groes or Abaty Glyn Egwestl) is in the Dee (Dyfrdwy) valley about 1½ miles upstream and north of Llangollen, Denbighshire, in north-east Wales. The crucis ("of the cross") in its name refers to the Pillar of Eliseg which stands nearby, which would already have stood for nearly four centuries when the abbey was established in 1201.

Valle Crucis (Cistercian)

Valle Crucis Abbey (Welsh: Abaty Glyn y Groes or Abaty Glyn Egwestl) is in the Dee (Dyfrdwy) valley…

Waltham Abbey was founded in 1030 and a building was constructed on the site by Harold Godwinson (aka King Harold II). In 1177 the abbey was refounded as an Augustinian foundation. The Augustinian abbey was a popular place for overnight stays with kings and other notables who were hunting in Waltham Forest. It was the last abbey in England to be dissolved, in 1540.

Harold's Church at Waltham

Waltham Abbey was founded in 1030 and a building was constructed on the site by Harold Godwinson (aka…

The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor and was later rebuilt again by Henry III in 1245, who had selected the site for his burial: it was consecrated on December 28, 1065, only a week before the Confessor's death and subsequent funeral. It was the site of the last coronation prior to the Norman Invasion, that of his successor King Harold.

Westminster Abbey

The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor and was later rebuilt…

An illustration of the Poet's Corner in Westminster Abbey. The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English, later British and later still (and currently) Monarchs of the Commonwealth Realms. Aristocrats were buried inside chapels and monks and people associated with the Abbey were buried in the Cloisters and other areas. One of these was Geoffrey Chaucer, who was buried here as he had apartments in the Abbey where he was employed as master of the Kings Works. Other poets were buried or memorialized around Chaucer in what became known as Poets' Corner

Westminster Abbey

An illustration of the Poet's Corner in Westminster Abbey. The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster,…

The gothic architecture of Westminster Abbey, the great church in London, England.

Westminster Abbey

The gothic architecture of Westminster Abbey, the great church in London, England.

The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey. Founded by Edward the Confessor when released from his vow to make a pilgrimage to the grave of St. Peter at Rome. It is a large, mainly Gothic church, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and later British monarchs. It briefly held the status of a cathedral from 1546–1556, and is currently a Royal Peculiar.

Westminster Abbey

The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original…

The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor and was later rebuilt again by Henry III in 1245, who had selected the site for his burial: it was consecrated on December 28, 1065, only a week before the Confessor's death and subsequent funeral. It was the site of the last coronation prior to the Norman Invasion, that of his successor King Harold.

Chapter House, Westminster Abbey

The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor and was later rebuilt…

The plan of the Westminster Cathedral in London with elements indicated.

Westminster Cathedral

The plan of the Westminster Cathedral in London with elements indicated.

Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on Whitby's East Cliff in North Yorkshire on the northeast coast of England. It was founded in 657 AD by the Anglo-Saxon King of Northumbria, Oswy as Streoneshalh.

The Ruins of Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey is a ruined Benedictine abbey sited on Whitby's East Cliff in North Yorkshire on the northeast…

Wimborne Minster, known locally as the Minster, is the parish church of Wimborne, Dorset, England. The Minster has existed for over 1300 years and is recognized for its unusual chained library (one of only four surviving chained libraries in the world). The Minster, a former monastery and Benedictine nunnery, is the resting place of King Ethelred of Wessex.

Wimborne Minster

Wimborne Minster, known locally as the Minster, is the parish church of Wimborne, Dorset, England. The…

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe. Construction of the cathedral began in 1079 under bishop Walkelin, and on April 8, 1093, in the presence of nearly all the bishops and abbots of England.

Winchester Cathedral

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the…

The Cathedral was founded in 680 with Bishop Bosel as its head. The first cathedral was built in this period but nothing now remains of it. The existing crypt of the cathedral dates from the 10th century and the time of St Oswald, bishop of Worcester. The current cathedral dates from the 12th and 13th centuries.

Worcester Cathedral

The Cathedral was founded in 680 with Bishop Bosel as its head. The first cathedral was built in this…

Pinnacle of buttress at York Minster cathedral in York, England.

York Minster Buttress Pinnacle

Pinnacle of buttress at York Minster cathedral in York, England.

York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is the second largest of its kind in Northern Europe. It is the seat of the Archbishop of York, and cathedral for the Diocese of York, and is run by a Dean and Chapter under the Dean of York. Its formal title is The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St. Peter in York.

West Front of York Minster

York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is the second largest of its kind in Northern…