The Cameras and Photography ClipArt gallery offers 16 illustration of photographic equipment and processes.

"If light from a highly luminous body is admitted to a darkened room through a small hole in the shutter and ther received upon a white screen, it will form an inverted image of the object." -Avery 1895

Image by Aperature

"If light from a highly luminous body is admitted to a darkened room through a small hole in the shutter…

A device used to take pictures, either singly or in sequence, with or without sound recording, such as with video cameras.

Camera

A device used to take pictures, either singly or in sequence, with or without sound recording, such…

"An optical instrument employed to facilitate the sketching of objects from nature by producing a reflected picture of them upon paper. Wollaston's apparatus is one of the commonest. The essential part is a totally-reflecting prism with four angles, one of which is 90 degrees, the opposite one 135 degrees, and the other two each 67 degrees. One of the two faces which contain the right angle is turned towards the object to be sketched." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Camera Lucida

"An optical instrument employed to facilitate the sketching of objects from nature by producing a reflected…

"An optical instrument employed for exhibiting the images of objects in their forms and colors, so that they may be traced and a picture drawn, or may be represented by photography. A simple camera obscura is presented by a darkened chamber into which no light is permitted to enter excepting by a small hole in the window-shutter. A picture of the objects opposite the hole will then be seen on the wall or on a white screen placed opposite the opening." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Camera Obscura

"An optical instrument employed for exhibiting the images of objects in their forms and colors, so that…

"Camera obscura strictly signifies a darkened chamber, because the room must be darkened, in order to observe its effects. To witness the phenomena of this instrument, let a room be closed in every direction, so as to exclude the light. Then from an aperture, say of an inch in diameter, admit a single beam of light, and the images of external things, such as trees and houses, and persons walking the streets, will be seen inverted on the wall opposite to where the light is admitted, or on a screen of white paper, placed before the aperture. The reason why the image is inverted will be obvious, when it is remembered that the rays proceeding from the extremities of the object must converge in order to pass through the small aperture; and as the rays of light always proceed in straight lines, they must cross each other at the point of admission. Thus the pencil a, coming from the upperpart of the tower, and proceeding straight, will represent the image of the part at b, while the lower part c, for the same reason, will be represented at d." —Comstock, 1850

Camera Obscura

"Camera obscura strictly signifies a darkened chamber, because the room must be darkened, in order to…

"Camera obscura strictly signifies a darkened chamber, because the room must be darkened, in order to observe its effects. To witness the phenomena of this instrument, let a room be closed in every direction, so as to exclude the light. Then from an aperture, say of an inch in diameter, admit a single beam of light, and the images of external things, such as trees and houses, and persons walking the streets, will be seen inverted on the wall opposite to where the light is admitted, or on a screen of white paper, placed before the aperture. The reason why the image is inverted will be obvious, when it is remembered that the rays proceeding from the extremities of the object must converge in order to pass through the small aperture; and as the rays of light always proceed in straight lines, they must cross each other at the point of admission. Thus the pencil a, coming from the upperpart of the tower, and proceeding straight, will represent the image of the part at b, while the lower part c, for the same reason, will be represented at d." —Comstock, 1850

Camera Obscura

"Camera obscura strictly signifies a darkened chamber, because the room must be darkened, in order to…

This image shows a woman creating an illustration using the camera obscura.

Camera Obscura

This image shows a woman creating an illustration using the camera obscura.

"The photographer's camera corresponds to the camera-obscura. A darkened box, adjustable in length, takes the place of the darkened room, and an achromatic convex lens is substituted for the aperture in the shutter." — Avery, 1895

Bellows camera

"The photographer's camera corresponds to the camera-obscura. A darkened box, adjustable in length,…

Eastman's Kodak camera from Switzerland in 1907.

Kodak Camera, 1907

Eastman's Kodak camera from Switzerland in 1907.

Equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and light-sensitive film at the other)

Photographic Camera

Equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and…

Camera in which you view the scene through the same lens that takes the picture.

Picture Machine

Camera in which you view the scene through the same lens that takes the picture.

A diagrammatic illustration of how a photograph is produced.

Photography

A diagrammatic illustration of how a photograph is produced.

A stand is a standing support or foundation which in this case is strictly to hold a camera in place.

Stand for Supporting Cameras

A stand is a standing support or foundation which in this case is strictly to hold a camera in place.

Although vignetting is normally unintended and undesired, it is sometimes purposely introduced for creative effect, such as to draw attention to the center of the frame

Vignetting Camera Attachment

Although vignetting is normally unintended and undesired, it is sometimes purposely introduced for creative…

"Suppose the object a, appears to the naked eye of the length repreesnted in the drawing. Now, as the rays coming from each end of the object, form by their convergence at the eye, the visual angle, or the angle under which the object is seem, and we call objects large or small in proportion as this angle is obtuse or acute, if, therefore, the object a be withdrawn futher from the eye, it is apparent that the rays o, o, proceeding from its extremities, will enter the eye under a more acute angle, and therefore that the object will appear diminished in proportion." -Comstock 1850

Visual Angle

"Suppose the object a, appears to the naked eye of the length repreesnted in the drawing. Now, as the…

An illustration of a woman in a long dress and hat standing behind a camera.

Woman Standing Behind Camera

An illustration of a woman in a long dress and hat standing behind a camera.