The French Buildings and Monuments ClipArt gallery offers 132 illustrations of churches, cathedrals, government buildings, castles, monuments, and other famous French structures.

The Grand Hotel in Marseilles, France.

Marseilles Grand Hotel

The Grand Hotel in Marseilles, France.

Jacques Coeur's House in Bourges.

Jacques Coeur's House

Jacques Coeur's House in Bourges.

"The French town houses differ, moreover, essentially in entire design, which influences their style, from those of other countries. This remark does not apply to those houses which are calculated for one family only, nor to the palatial residences of the nobility and plutocracy, which the French call Hôtels. This difference partly consists in the universal employment of the ground-floor as shops, which are only separated from the street by an opening which is glazed over and supported by individual iron girders. The whole façade consequently appears rather to be suspended in the air than supported architecturally. Over the shop, there is almost always an entresol, that is to say, a low storey between the ground floor and the first storey. The restriction to a certain height which the façade may not exceed has a determinating influence on the form of the topmost portion of the building, inasmuch as above this height the façade is terminated by an offset which slopes backwards over the upper storey [shown here]. Projecting balconies are, moreover, usual along the whole length of the façades, making the divisions into storeys. When these balconies are not met with, the windows of each storey come down to the top of the storey below, or at any rate nearly so, and have iron balustrades in front of them; this construction is partly owing to the storeys from their great number being so low that without this remedy the windows would appear too small and badly proportioned. The lowness of the storeys necessarily exercises a prejudicial effect on the architectural beauty of the façades; so that it is difficult to impart any structural significance to the houses, which consequently only convey and sense of beauty through their details."

Façade of a House in Paris

"The French town houses differ, moreover, essentially in entire design, which influences their style,…

Les Invalides in Paris, France, is a complex of buildings in the city's 7th arrondissement containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans. The buildings house the Musée de l'Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d'Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France's war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte."The principal architectural activity of this period was displayed by Jules Hardouin Mansard, who was head architect to the king and the head of the influential school, as Lenôtre at the same time was principal horticulturist. Mansard built the palaces of Versailles (1647-1708, Marly, the Grand Trianon, as also the Invalides at Paris [shown here]."

Invalides at Paris

Les Invalides in Paris, France, is a complex of buildings in the city's 7th arrondissement containing…

A complex of buildings containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France. It also contains a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans.

Hôtel des Invalides

A complex of buildings containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France.…

Jacques Caeur's Hostel at Bourges.

Jacques

Jacques Caeur's Hostel at Bourges.

"The Bastille, after its capture in 1789, was leveled to the ground, and its stones were used to build one of the bridges over the Seine. The site of the fortress-prison is now a public square. In the center rises the July Column (154 feet high), commemorating the revolutionists of 1830."—Webster, 1920

Colonne Juillet

"The Bastille, after its capture in 1789, was leveled to the ground, and its stones were used to build…

The Cathedral of Laon.

Laon

The Cathedral of Laon.

An illustration of the town of Le Mans located in Northern France.

Le Mans

An illustration of the town of Le Mans located in Northern France.

An illustration of Le Mans from the river.

Le Mans

An illustration of Le Mans from the river.

The Louvre in the Fourteenth Century.

Louvre

The Louvre in the Fourteenth Century.

Colonnade of the Louvre.

Louvre

Colonnade of the Louvre.

"The palace of the Louvre was begun by Francis I in the sixteenth century and continued by his successors, especially Louis XIV. Important additions were made during the nineteenth century. The Tuileries palace, so named from the tile kilns (tuileries) which once occupied the site, was burned in 1879. Nothing reminds of the structure except two wings connected with the Louvre."—Webster, 1920

The Louvre and the Tuileries

"The palace of the Louvre was begun by Francis I in the sixteenth century and continued by his successors,…

"Louvre is the name of a celebrated public building of Paris, situated in the N. part of the city, near the right band of the Seine."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Louvre West Pavilion

"Louvre is the name of a celebrated public building of Paris, situated in the N. part of the city, near…

An illustration of the Louvre Museum in Paris, France from a bird's-eye view. The Louvre is one of the the world's largest museums and is the most visited museum in the world.

Bird's Eye View of the Louvre

An illustration of the Louvre Museum in Paris, France from a bird's-eye view. The Louvre is one of the…

The outside view of the Louvre.

Colonnade of the Louvre

The outside view of the Louvre.

"The change from the pure to the later Renaissance , which was formerly seen only in individual instances, has now received a certain extension. This is mainly owing to the key-note struck in the New Louvre [shown here], begun by Visconti, but finished by another architect. Although it is true that the new building conforms in general to the architecture of the Old Louvre, yet still an increase rather than a decrease is to be perceived in the effort for picturesque effect, in the licence of the Roccoco style, and in an unstructural treatment of the individual forms and ornamental parts."

Corner Pavilion of the New Louvre

"The change from the pure to the later Renaissance , which was formerly seen only in individual instances,…

The most beautiful part of the Louvre Courtyard.

Courtyard of the Louvre

The most beautiful part of the Louvre Courtyard.

The Musée du Louvre or officially the Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or Great Louvre, or simply the Louvre — is the national museum of France, the most visited museum in the world, and a historic monument. It is a central landmark of Paris, located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the 1st arrondissement (neighborhood). Nearly 35,000 objects from the 6th century BC to the 19th century are exhibited over an area of 60,600 square meters (652,300 square feet).The Louvre was built by "three prominent architects, [one of which was] Pierre Lescot (1510-1578), who desiged the celebrated Western Façade of the Louvre [shown here]."

Inner Façade of the Louvre

The Musée du Louvre or officially the Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or Great…

An illustration of one of the galleries in the Louvre in Paris, France. The Louvre is one of the world's largest museums and is most visited museum in the world.

Gallery in the Louvre

An illustration of one of the galleries in the Louvre in Paris, France. The Louvre is one of the world's…

An illustration of Luxembourg Palace which is located in Paris, France. The Luxembourg Palace houses the famous Luxembourg Garden which displays a large garden and lawn full of statues and large water basins.

Luxembourg Palace

An illustration of Luxembourg Palace which is located in Paris, France. The Luxembourg Palace houses…

Lyons-la-Forêt is a commune in the Eure department in Normandy, in northern France. Because of its architecture which has been maintained as it was at the beginning of the 17th century, it is also a well-known landmark within the very distinct geophysical and geocultural entity that is the Pays de Bray, known for its traditional bocage landscape of woods, orchards and cattle economy.

The City of Lyons, France

Lyons-la-Forêt is a commune in the Eure department in Normandy, in northern France. Because of…

"Begun by Napoleon in 1806; not completed until 1842. The emperor planned it as a 'of fame' to commemorate his victories, but it now serves as a church. The structure has the lines of a Roman temple, with a colonnade of Corinthian pillars."—Webster, 1920

La Madeleine

"Begun by Napoleon in 1806; not completed until 1842. The emperor planned it as a 'of fame' to commemorate…

The Cathedral of Mans is a Roman Catholic Cathedral located in Le Mans, France. The Cathedral was built in dedication to the city's first bishop Saint Julian of Le Mans. It is built in a Romanesque and Gothic style.

Cathedral of Mans

The Cathedral of Mans is a Roman Catholic Cathedral located in Le Mans, France. The Cathedral was built…

"Ecole de Medecine, Paris." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Medecine

"Ecole de Medecine, Paris." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

An illustration of the sarcophagus of Napoleon Bonaparte located in the Church of the Hotel des Invalides.

Sarcophagus of Napoleon Bonaparte

An illustration of the sarcophagus of Napoleon Bonaparte located in the Church of the Hotel des Invalides.

An illustration of the tomb of the sarcophagus of Napoleon Bonaparte located in the Church of the Hotel des Invalides.

Tomb of Napoleon Bonaparte

An illustration of the tomb of the sarcophagus of Napoleon Bonaparte located in the Church of the Hotel…

The birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Napoleon's Birthplace (Ajaccio)

The birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte.

"In 1840 Napoleon's body was removed from St. Helena, taken with great pomp to Paris, and deposited in a sarcophagus of red Finland granite under the gilded dome of the Hôtel des Invalides. Twelve colossal statues, representing the chief victories of Napoleon, surround the tomb, and between the figures are battleflags captured at Austerlitz. Two of the emperor's brothers are buried in adjoining chapels."—Webster, 1920

The Tomb of Napoleon

"In 1840 Napoleon's body was removed from St. Helena, taken with great pomp to Paris, and deposited…

The arena of Nimes is a roman amphitheater located in city of Nimes, France. The amphitheater was built around 70 A.D. during the time of Emperor Caesar Augustus. The structure is designed in an enclosed ellipsis.

The Arena of Nimes

The arena of Nimes is a roman amphitheater located in city of Nimes, France. The amphitheater was built…

The square house of Nimes is also known as Maison Carree. It is an ancient Roman temple located in Nimes, Souther France. It was built by Roman statesman and general, Marcus Agrippa in dedication to his sons. The temple is made up of corinthian columns in the front entrance and attached columns all around the structure.

The Square House of Nimes

The square house of Nimes is also known as Maison Carree. It is an ancient Roman temple located in Nimes,…

"The present structure, begun in 1163 and completed about 1240, suffered severely during the French Revolution, when it was converted into a Temple of Reason. Extensive renovations and alterations were made during the nineteenth century. Two massive square towers, originally intended to support spires, crown the principle or western façade. Its three doors are surrounded by elaborate sculptures and surmounted by a row of figures representing twenty-eight kings of Israel and Judah. Above the central door is a rose window of stained glass and above this is a graceful gallery of painted arches supported on slender columns."

Notre Dame

"The present structure, begun in 1163 and completed about 1240, suffered severely during the French…

Notre Dame viewed from the front.

Notre dame

Notre Dame viewed from the front.

An illustration of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. This building is also known as Notre Dame de Paris which is French for Our Lady of Paris. It is the church which contains the official chair of the Archbishop of Paris.

Notre Dame Cathedral

An illustration of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France. This building is also known as Notre Dame…

The chevet of Notre Dame viewed from the shore line.

Chevet of Notre Dame

The chevet of Notre Dame viewed from the shore line.

A gable is the generally triangular portion of a wall between the edges of a sloping roof. A wimperg is a German and Dutch word for a Gothic ornamental gable with tracery over windows or portals, which were often accompanied with pinnacles. It was a typical element in Gothic Architecture especially in cathedral architecture. Wimpergs often had crockets or other decorative elements in the Gothic style. The intention behind the wimperg was the perception of increased height.

Openwork Gable, From Front of Rouen Cathedral

A gable is the generally triangular portion of a wall between the edges of a sloping roof. A wimperg…

An illustration of The Opera House in Paris, France. It is commonly known as the Paris Opera. This Opera house was built in the Neo-Baroque style by Charles Garnier and was known as one of the most advanced architectural works of its time.

Opera House

An illustration of The Opera House in Paris, France. It is commonly known as the Paris Opera. This Opera…

The Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra de Paris or Opéra Garnier, but more commonly as the Paris Opéra, is a 2,200-seat opera house on the Place de l'Opéra in Paris, France. A grand landmark designed by Charles Garnier in the Neo-Baroque style, it is regarded as one of the architectural masterpieces of its time."The newest and most important building is the new Opera House at Paris," this image "presents an external view.The competition which was announced for the plans for this building brought out at the time the most eminent, artistic, and architectural talent of France, and aroused a very general and lively interest in the result: inasmuch as an architectural chef-d'œuvre was to be produced, such as Paris did not possess before, and one in which the architecture of the present day was to make the utmost possible effect to build a theatre, which in every respect should be worthy of the metropolis of the world, and should thanks to the almost unlimited means at disposal, be the most perfect of its kind."

View of the Opera House in Paris

The Palais Garnier, also known as the Opéra de Paris or Opéra Garnier, but more commonly as the Paris…

The Paris Opera House was built by architect Charles Garnier, who was chosen by Emperor Napoleon III. It was built in the late 19th century in a Neo-Baroque style.

Paris Opera House

The Paris Opera House was built by architect Charles Garnier, who was chosen by Emperor Napoleon III.…

The Petit Palais (Small Palace) is a museum in Paris, France. It was built for the Universal Exhibition in 1900 and now houses the City of Paris Museum of Fine Arts.

Petit Palais

The Petit Palais (Small Palace) is a museum in Paris, France. It was built for the Universal Exhibition…

The Panthéon (Latin Pantheon, from Greek Pantheon, meaning "Every god") is a building in the Latin Quarter in Paris, France. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve, but after many changes now combines liturgical functions with its role as a famous burial place. It is an early example of Neoclassicism, with a façade modeled on the Pantheon in Rome, surmounted by a small dome that owes some of its character to Bramante's "Tempietto". Located in the 5th arrondissement on the Montagne Sainte-Geneviève, the Panthéon looks out over all of Paris. Its architect, Jacques-Germain Soufflot, had the intention of combining the lightness and brightness of the gothic cathedral with classical principles. Soufflot died before his work was achieved, and his plans were not entirely followed. The transparency he had planned for his masterpiece was not attained. Nevertheless, it is one of the most important architectural achievements of its time and the first great neoclassical monument."Toward the end of the reign of Louis XV. a reaction set in, which was caused partly by the excess and caprice displayed in the application of this style, and partly by the tide again setting in the direction of the antique. This evidence by the Colonnades de la Place de Concorde, and by the Church of Ste. Geneviève, which was begun by Soufflot in the year 1755, and subsequently received the name of Pantheon [shown here]. From thenceforth imitations of ancient buildings came into vogue, as they also did in other countries."

West Front of the Pantheon at Paris

The Panthéon (Latin Pantheon, from Greek Pantheon, meaning "Every god") is a building in the Latin…

View of the Paris Bourse.

Paris Bourse

View of the Paris Bourse.

Paris Exhibition in 1878.

Paris Exhibition

Paris Exhibition in 1878.

The Musée du Louvre or officially the Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or Great Louvre, or simply the Louvre — is the national museum of France, the most visited museum in the world, and a historic monument. It is a central landmark of Paris, located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the 1st arrondissement (neighborhood). Nearly 35,000 objects from the 6th century BC to the 19th century are exhibited over an area of 60,600 square meters (652,300 square feet)."Du Cerceau, who flourished during the reign of Henry IV., connected the block of buildings which belong to the Louvre, and had been constructed under Catherine dei Medici, by a gallery with the Tuileries. This architect abandoned the characteristic feature of the French Renaissance, which had prevailed hitherto, namely, of giving its peculiar columnar order to each storey, and assimilated his designs to those of the late Roman Renaissance, in which a striking effect was produced at the expense of truth by continuous columns and pilasters extending over several storeys and rows of windows.Although Du Cerceau was obligated to leave France in the year 1604, the impulse which he had given in the direction of the above-mentioned manner led to its being generally adopted. The new buildings were more correct, but less picturesque than those built during the earlier period of the French Renaissance, and a certain insipidity seems to characterize the various structures erected during the reigns of Henry IV., and especially Louis XIII. As is shown [here], a combination of free-stone and brick was restored to in such a way that the former was employed for the mouldings, and for the quoins and dressings of the doors and windows, whilst brick was used for the spaces between. In the case of the windows the free-stone introduced assumed the forms of quoins. If ornamentation had been previously excessive, it now retired into the background, and was only employed in moderation; and the method of its treatment began to be distinguished from that of the former period. The forms of the details above all began to lose in purity: rustications were inappropriately introduced in the walls and columns, and the roofs were made high and steep, which gave the rest of the building a heavy and squat appearance, whilst the numerous turret-shaped chimneys, which were necessitated by these high roofs, formed a peculiar feature in the construction."

Paris, Royal Palace Façade

The Musée du Louvre or officially the Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or Great…

"Erected 1861-1875. Covers nearly three acres and cost $7,000,000. A huge dome extends over the auditorium. The interior is magnificently decorated."—Webster, 1920

The Opera, Paris

"Erected 1861-1875. Covers nearly three acres and cost $7,000,000. A huge dome extends over the auditorium.…

Eiffel Tower in Paris, 1901

Eiffel Tower

Eiffel Tower in Paris, 1901

"Central Pavilion of the Tuileries, as designed by De Lorme (from Mariette)." — Chambers, 1881

Pavilion of the Tuileries

"Central Pavilion of the Tuileries, as designed by De Lorme (from Mariette)." — Chambers, 1881

The Turgot Pavilion is part of the Louvre Palace which is located along the Seine river in Paris, France. The Turgot pavilion was built in the New Louvre section, the northern limb of the palace.

The Turgot Pavilion

The Turgot Pavilion is part of the Louvre Palace which is located along the Seine river in Paris, France.…

An illustration of the Place de la Bastille which is a square in Paris where the Bastille Prison once stood. It was built between 1370 and 1383.

Place de la Bastille

An illustration of the Place de la Bastille which is a square in Paris where the Bastille Prison once…

An illustration of the Place de la Concorde in Paris, France. It is the largest square in the French capital. It was named Place Louis XV after the king of the time.

Place de la Concorde

An illustration of the Place de la Concorde in Paris, France. It is the largest square in the French…

Views of the Castle of Plessis-Les-Tours.

Plessis

Views of the Castle of Plessis-Les-Tours.

An illustration of the Pont des Arts and the Louvre in Paris, France. The Pont des Arts is a bridge in Paris which stretches over the Seine River. The bridge goes between the Institute de France and the Louvre. The Louvre is one of the world's largest museums and is the most visited museum of the world.

Pont des Arts and the Louvre

An illustration of the Pont des Arts and the Louvre in Paris, France. The Pont des Arts is a bridge…

An illustration of the Porte Saint-Denis which is a Parisian monument located at one of the gates of the Wall of Charles V.

Porte St. Denis

An illustration of the Porte Saint-Denis which is a Parisian monument located at one of the gates of…

"Architectural Refinement from Church of St. Quentin, France ... deviations from the geometrical accuracy of purely structural lines, which have been found widely distributed in architecture before the most modern era." -Whitney, 1911

Refinement

"Architectural Refinement from Church of St. Quentin, France ... deviations from the geometrical…

The Cathedral of Rheims is also known as Notre-Dame de Rheims in French. It is a Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in Rheim, France. It was the site of where the Kings of France were once crowned. The Cathedral was completed during the end of the 13th century.

Cathedral of Rheims

The Cathedral of Rheims is also known as Notre-Dame de Rheims in French. It is a Roman Catholic Cathedral,…

The Arles Amphitheatre is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles.

Roman Amphitheatre at Arles

The Arles Amphitheatre is a Roman amphitheatre in the southern French town of Arles.

"The Pont du Gard near Nimes (ancient Nemausus) in southern France. Built by the emperor Antoninus Pius. The bridge spans two hilltops nearly a thousand feet apart. It carries an aqueduct with three tiers of massive stone arches at a height of 160 feet above the stream. This is the finest and best preserved aqueduct in existence."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Aqueduct

"The Pont du Gard near Nimes (ancient Nemausus) in southern France. Built by the emperor Antoninus Pius.…

"The best preserved of Roman temples. Located at Nimes in southern France, where it is known as La Maison Carree ("the square house"). The structure is now used as a museum of antiquities."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Temple

"The best preserved of Roman temples. Located at Nimes in southern France, where it is known as La Maison…

A Rose window (or Catherine window) is often used as a generic term applied to a circular window, but is especially used for those found in churches of the Gothic architectural style and being divided into segments by stone mullions and tracery. The name "rose window" was not used before the 17th century and according to the Oxford English Dictionary, among other authorities, comes from the English flower name rose.

Rose Window, Church of St. Ouen, Rouen

A Rose window (or Catherine window) is often used as a generic term applied to a circular window, but…

A thermal spa in Dax, France.

Thermal Spa

A thermal spa in Dax, France.