The France Miscellaneous ClipArt gallery offers 52 illustrations of everyday life in France, historic costume, places, documents, and other illustrations related to France.

"After appropriating to national purposes the land belonging to the church, the French National Assembly, instead of bringing it into the market at a time of insecurity, when its value was depreciated, issued bonds on the security of it, which were called assignats, as representing land assigned to the holder. This paper money consisted chiefly of notes for 100 francs each, though many of them were for sums as low as ten or five francs, and even lower; and the first issue amounted to 400 million francs." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Assignat

"After appropriating to national purposes the land belonging to the church, the French National Assembly,…

A type of monetary instrument used during the French Revolution.

An Assignat

A type of monetary instrument used during the French Revolution.

"Key of the Bastile. This key of the old Paris prison known as the Bastile, was sent by La Fayette to Washington after the destruction of that edifice by the infuriated populace on the 14th of July, 1789. This was the beginning of the French Revolution. The Bastille was originally a royal place, built by Charles the Fifth of France in 1369. It was afterward used as a state prison, like the Tower of London, and became the scene of dreadful sufferings and frightful crimes. When the mob gained possession of it in 1789, they took the governor and other officers to the Place de Greve, where they first cut off their hands and then their heads. With the key, La Fayette sent a plaster model of the old building. The model, somewhat defaced from long exposure in the Alexandria museum, is among the collections of the National Institute, while the key retains its ancient position at Mount Vernon. It is of wrought iron, seven inches long. La Fayette, in his letter to Washington which accompanied the key and picture, dated 'Paris, March 17th, 1789,' said, 'Give me leave, my dear general, to present you with a picture of the Bastile, just as it appeared a few days after I had ordered its demolition, with the main key of this fortress of despotism. It is a tribute which I owe as a son to my adopted father; as an aid-de-camp to my general; as a missionary liberty to its patriarch.'"—Lossing, 1851

Bastile Key

"Key of the Bastile. This key of the old Paris prison known as the Bastile, was sent by La Fayette to…

An ancient town first recorded in the journals of Julius Caesar.

Besancon

An ancient town first recorded in the journals of Julius Caesar.

Section of the Cantal district of France, showing the reconstruction of the old volcano with its succession of lava flows.

Cantal District of France

Section of the Cantal district of France, showing the reconstruction of the old volcano with its succession…

A. Cross, B. Gate-house, C. Almonry, D. Chapel, E. Inner gate-house, F. Stable, G. Dormitory of lay brethren, H. Abbot's House. I. Kitchen, K. Refectory, L. Staircase to dormitory, M. Dormitory, N. Church, P. Library, R. Infirmary, S. Door to the church for the lay brothers, T. Base court, V. Great cloister, W. Small cloister, X. Boundary wall.

Bird Eye View of Citeaux

A. Cross, B. Gate-house, C. Almonry, D. Chapel, E. Inner gate-house, F. Stable, G. Dormitory of lay…

The lower house of the legislature of France between 1795 and 1799.

Original Costume of a Member of the Council of the Five Hundred

The lower house of the legislature of France between 1795 and 1799.

A royal crown.

French Crown

A royal crown.

The Last of the Druids.

Druids

The Last of the Druids.

"The Eagle is an emblem in heraldry, war, and legend. The eagle, borne upon a spear, was used by the Persians as a standard in the battle of Cunaxa, B. C. 401. The Romans used eagles of silver, or more rarely of gold, carried in the same way as standards. The Napoleon dynasty of France also adopted the eagle as their symbol. A double-headed eagle is the emblem of Russia, Austria, and Prussia."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

French Eagle

"The Eagle is an emblem in heraldry, war, and legend. The eagle, borne upon a spear, was used by the…

The Erfurt Theatre.

Erfurt

The Erfurt Theatre.

A group of French soldiers during the French Exploration

French Explorers

A group of French soldiers during the French Exploration

Black and white outline flag of France. Three equal vertical bands of blue (hoist side), white, and red; known as the "Le drapeau tricolore" (French Tricolor), the origin of the flag dates to 1790 and the French Revolution; the design and/or colors are similar to a number of other flags, including those of Belgium, Chad, Ireland, Cote d'Ivoire, Luxembourg, and Netherlands; the official flag for all French dependent areas

Flag of France, 2009

Black and white outline flag of France. Three equal vertical bands of blue (hoist side), white, and…

Flag of France, 1881

France, flag

Flag of France, 1881

The Coat of Arms of France.

French Coat of Arms

The Coat of Arms of France.

A French Noble from the fifteenth century

French Noble

A French Noble from the fifteenth century

French soldiers and officers in the French and Indian War.

French Soldiers

French soldiers and officers in the French and Indian War.

"Gable Tower, Dormans, France. A tower finished with gables on two sides or on all four sides, instead of terminating in a spire, a parapet, or otherwise." -Whitney, 1911

Gable Tower in France

"Gable Tower, Dormans, France. A tower finished with gables on two sides or on all four sides, instead…

Grand Puy of Sarcoui, composed of trachyte and rising between two breached scoria cones. Located in Auvergne, France.

Grand Puy of Sarcoui

Grand Puy of Sarcoui, composed of trachyte and rising between two breached scoria cones. Located in…

"The guillotine was used during the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. Now that the power of the Girondists was broken, and military successes had strengthened the revolutionary party in control, France entered upon that part of the Revolution known as the Reign of Terror. The characteristic feature of the next few months was the wholesale murder of all persons suspected of hostility toward the Jacobin government or lukewarmness on its behalf. To be sure, the victims enjoyed the show of a judicial trial, but sentence was rendered without regard to justice or the facts of the case and execution followed quickly. The guillotine, named after its inventor, Dr. Guillotin, was a serviceable instrument for disposing quickly of the condemned, and hardly a day passed without seeing a score or more of suspected persons beheaded in the city of Paris alone."—Colby, 1899

Guillotine

"The guillotine was used during the Reign of Terror of the French Revolution. Now that the power of…

"The guillotine is an apparatus for beheading persons at one stroke, adopted by the National Assembly of France during the first Revolution, on the proposals of a Dr. Guillotin, after whom it was named."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Guillotine

"The guillotine is an apparatus for beheading persons at one stroke, adopted by the National Assembly…

Device for beheading during the French Revolution.

Guillotine

Device for beheading during the French Revolution.

The guillotine was a decapitating execution device invented by Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, remembered for its use in the French Revolution.

Guillotine

The guillotine was a decapitating execution device invented by Joseph-Ignace Guillotin, remembered for…

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall upright frame from which a heavy blade is suspended. This blade is raised with a rope and then allowed to drop, severing the victim's head from his or her body. The device is noted for long being the main method of execution in France and, more particularly, for its use during the French Revolution. The guillotine also "became a part of popular culture, celebrated as the people's avenger by supporters of the Revolution and vilified as the preeminent symbol of the Terror by opponents.

Guillotine

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall…

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall upright frame from which a blade is suspended. This blade is raised with a rope and then allowed to drop, severing the victim's head from his or her body.

Guillotine

The guillotine was a device used for carrying out executions by decapitation. It consists of a tall…

A device used for carrying out executions by decapitation.

The Guillotine

A device used for carrying out executions by decapitation.

French Huguenots in full attire.

French Huguenots

French Huguenots in full attire.

"A Knight Templar. During the Crusades, there were military and religious orders. Between the first and second crusades two peculiar military and religious orders were established. These were the Knights, Hospitalers, or Knights of St. John, and the Knights Templars. The Knights of St. John were organized originally to care for the sick and wounded among the crusaders and pilgrims to Jerusalem. They took the usual vows of monks, but to these were added vows of military service. They had thus a combined religious and military character, being fighting men as well as monks. The Knights Templars wre organized on a similar plan, but their original purpose had been to protect the pilgrims to the Holy Land. At a later date there was another of these orders established under the name of the Tentonic Knights. All three played an important part in the crusades, and they continued to exist long after the crusades were over."—Colby, 1899

Knight Templar

"A Knight Templar. During the Crusades, there were military and religious orders. Between the first…

"La Fayette's tomb."—Lossing, 1851

La Fayette's Tomb

"La Fayette's tomb."—Lossing, 1851

The tomb of General Lafayette.

Lafayette's Tomb

The tomb of General Lafayette.

"It represents a dying lion, which, pierced by a lance, still guards with its paw the Bourbon lilies. The figure is hewn out of the natural sandstone. The monument commemorates the officers and men of the Swiss Guard who were slain in 1792, while defending the Tuileries against the Parisian mob."—Webster, 1920

The Lion of Lucerne

"It represents a dying lion, which, pierced by a lance, still guards with its paw the Bourbon lilies.…

"Monoliths or single upright stones. The best example is at Carnac, in Brittany. This huge stone when perfect, was 63 feet high, and 14 feet in diameter at its widest part. It is rudely shaped to a circular form, and weighs about 260 tons." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Maenhir and Trillithon

"Monoliths or single upright stones. The best example is at Carnac, in Brittany. This huge stone when…

The monastery of St.-Germain-des-Pres in Paris, France.

Monastery in Paris

The monastery of St.-Germain-des-Pres in Paris, France.

The Mont Blanc (French for white mountain) or Monte Bianco (Italian 'White Mountain'), also known as "La Dame Blanche" (French, the white lady) is a mountain in the Alps. With its 4,810 m (15,781 ft) summit, it is the highest mountain in the Alps and Western Europe, and is ranked 11th in the world in topographic prominence. The mountain lies between the regions of Aosta Valley, Italy, and Haute-Savoie, France. The location of the summit is on the French-Italian border but Cartographers of France place it within its own boundaries on maps.

Mont Blanc

The Mont Blanc (French for white mountain) or Monte Bianco (Italian 'White Mountain'), also known as…

The bed in which Napoleon I used while away from home.

Napoleon's Camp Bed

The bed in which Napoleon I used while away from home.

An illustration of a French nobleman.

French Nobleman

An illustration of a French nobleman.

"The cleric wars a robe and ornamented mantle; the noble, a suit of black silk and a cap adorned with plumes; the representative of the Third Estate, a simple black suit without gold buttons or plumed cap."—Webster, 1920

Costumes of the Orders

"The cleric wars a robe and ornamented mantle; the noble, a suit of black silk and a cap adorned with…

This image shows Orleans in the fifteenth century. Orleans is a city and commune in north-central France.

Orleans

This image shows Orleans in the fifteenth century. Orleans is a city and commune in north-central France.

Necker at St. Ouen.

Ouen

Necker at St. Ouen.

The Reading of "Paul and Virginia."

Paul

The Reading of "Paul and Virginia."

Abbey of Port-Royal.

Port Royal

Abbey of Port-Royal.

The carrying of the tomb of Philippe Pot.

Tomb of Philippe Pot

The carrying of the tomb of Philippe Pot.

La Rue Quincampoix.

Quincampoix

La Rue Quincampoix.

A marriage under the Republic of the French Revolution.

Republic Marriage

A marriage under the Republic of the French Revolution.

Richard's farewell to the holy land.

Richard

Richard's farewell to the holy land.

The Harbor of La Rochelle.

Rochelle

The Harbor of La Rochelle.

Coat of Arms, France

The Great Seal of France

Coat of Arms, France

Coat of Arms, France

The Great Seal of France

Coat of Arms, France

"See, See," She cried.

See See

"See, See," She cried.

"Shrine of St. Calmine, Duke of Aquitaine, in enameled and gilded copper; early 13th century." -Whitney, 1911

Shrine

"Shrine of St. Calmine, Duke of Aquitaine, in enameled and gilded copper; early 13th century." -Whitney,…

Picture of a typical French Soldier ready for battle.

French Soldier

Picture of a typical French Soldier ready for battle.

"Tapping with his Fingertips on the Window-Pane."

Tapping

"Tapping with his Fingertips on the Window-Pane."