The Christian Churches ClipArt gallery offers 142 views of various structures such as churches, cathedrals, chapels, monasteries, and baptistries.

"St. Martins-in-the-fields." —D'Anvers, 1895

St. Martins-in-the-fields

"St. Martins-in-the-fields." —D'Anvers, 1895

In addition to being a parish church in the Diocese of Ely, it is the University Church for the University of Cambridge. As such it has a minor role in the University's legislation: for example, University Officers must live within 20 miles of Great St. Mary's, and undergraduates within three. The church also hosts University Sermons, and houses the University Organ and the University Clock. The latter chimes the Cambridge Chimes which were later used by the clock tower of the Houses of Parliament ("Big Ben").

St. Mary's Church, Cambridge

In addition to being a parish church in the Diocese of Ely, it is the University Church for the University…

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The cathedral sits on the edge of London's oldest region, the City, which originated as a Roman trading post along the edge of the River Thames.

St. Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral, is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat…

"St. Saturnin at Toulouse." —D'Anvers, 1895

St. Saturnin

"St. Saturnin at Toulouse." —D'Anvers, 1895

It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for over 1,000 years, but a cathedral only since 1905. Henry Cardinal Beaufort repaired the church after a 1212 fire. The main structure of the present church was built between 1220 and 1420, making it the first Gothic church in London. Heresy trials occurred in the Galilee chapel in 1555, under Mary I of England.

Choir of St. Saviour's, Southwark

It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship…

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades in the 12th century the church was renamed St. Edmund and the Holy Sepulchre, in reference to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. The name eventually became contracted to St Sepulchre.

St. Sepulchre's, Cambridge

The original Saxon church on the site was dedicated to St. Edmund the King and Martyr. During the Crusades…

"This church was erected, a few years after Simeon's death, around the pillar (the base of which is to be seen in the cut) upon which the saint had passed so many years. It became one of the most popular of the medieval pilgrim shrines."—Myers, 1905

Ruins of the Church of St. Simeon Stylites

"This church was erected, a few years after Simeon's death, around the pillar (the base of which is…

St. Sophia is a Byzantine church in Istanbul, Turkey.

St. Sophia

St. Sophia is a Byzantine church in Istanbul, Turkey.

The cathedral of Strasbourg is a roman catholic cathedral located in Strasbourg, France. The church was erected by the bishop St. Argobast of the Strasbourg Diocese during the end of the 7th century. It is designed in a Gothic style with some parts in a Romanesque style. Today the church is the 6th tallest church in the world.

Cathedral of Strasbourg

The cathedral of Strasbourg is a roman catholic cathedral located in Strasbourg, France. The church…

Thomas Gray was a prominent English poet.  Stoke-Pogis Church, which is illustrated, was the subject of Gray's poem "Elegy."

Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray was a prominent English poet. Stoke-Pogis Church, which is illustrated, was the subject…

"Tournai Cathedral." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Tournai Cathedral

"Tournai Cathedral." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Trinity Church, a Protestant Episcopal church in Boston, Massachusetts.

Trinity

Trinity Church, a Protestant Episcopal church in Boston, Massachusetts.

"More than one cause served to render the compositions of Palladio so celebrated. He possessed an especial felicity in the arrangement of his ground-plans, particularly in instances where he had an unlimited space for disposal. His command, moreover, of good proportion , rendered his combinations of civic and sacred buildings most pleasing to the eye; whilst the columnar arrangement of his entrances conveyed an agreeable, and at the same time, dignified impression. Consequently the works of Palladio, although often composed of heterogeneous elements, remained for a long period the model for an entire style; and even in the eighteenth century, when the total deterioration of architecture, as exemplified in what is called by the Germans "the Zopf-und-Perrücken Styl" (pigtail and periwig style), led architects again in the direction of the classical, the designs of Palladio became anew a subject of study. Even in present day they are often immoderately praised by those who are not really conversant with the principles and requirements of art, and who are ignorant of the history of the development of architecture."Il Redentore, more properly Chiesa del Santissimo Redentore (Church of the Most Holy Redeemer), is Andrea Palladio's great domed church on Giudecca, one of the islands of Venice. Located on the waterfront of the Canale della Giudecca, it dominates the skyline of the island.The Redentore was built in thanksgiving for deliverance from the plague that decimated Venice from 1575 to 1576, in which some 46,000 people, 25-30 percent of the population, died. The Senate commissioned the great architect Palladio to design it. Construction began in May 1577. The building was in a satisfactory stage and was consecrated in 1592.

St. Saviour's, Venice

"More than one cause served to render the compositions of Palladio so celebrated. He possessed an especial…

Waltham Abbey was founded in 1030 and a building was constructed on the site by Harold Godwinson (aka King Harold II). In 1177 the abbey was refounded as an Augustinian foundation. The Augustinian abbey was a popular place for overnight stays with kings and other notables who were hunting in Waltham Forest. It was the last abbey in England to be dissolved, in 1540.

Harold's Church at Waltham

Waltham Abbey was founded in 1030 and a building was constructed on the site by Harold Godwinson (aka…

The gothic architecture of Westminster Abbey, the great church in London, England.

Westminster Abbey

The gothic architecture of Westminster Abbey, the great church in London, England.

The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor and was later rebuilt again by Henry III in 1245, who had selected the site for his burial: it was consecrated on December 28, 1065, only a week before the Confessor's death and subsequent funeral. It was the site of the last coronation prior to the Norman Invasion, that of his successor King Harold.

Westminster Abbey

The stone Abbey was built around 1045–1050 by King Edward the Confessor and was later rebuilt…

The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey. Founded by Edward the Confessor when released from his vow to make a pilgrimage to the grave of St. Peter at Rome. It is a large, mainly Gothic church, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English and later British monarchs. It briefly held the status of a cathedral from 1546–1556, and is currently a Royal Peculiar.

Westminster Abbey

The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original…

Wimborne Minster, known locally as the Minster, is the parish church of Wimborne, Dorset, England. The Minster has existed for over 1300 years and is recognized for its unusual chained library (one of only four surviving chained libraries in the world). The Minster, a former monastery and Benedictine nunnery, is the resting place of King Ethelred of Wessex.

Wimborne Minster

Wimborne Minster, known locally as the Minster, is the parish church of Wimborne, Dorset, England. The…

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe. Construction of the cathedral began in 1079 under bishop Walkelin, and on April 8, 1093, in the presence of nearly all the bishops and abbots of England.

Winchester Cathedral

Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the…

Borgund stave church is a stave church located in Borgund, Lærdal, Norway. It is classified as a triple nave stave church of the so-called Sogn-type. It was probably built in the end of the 12th century, and has not changed structure or had a major reconstruction since that date.The church site shows evidence of a previous building, which can point to an earlier church or perhaps an old pagan temple that had been taken into use as a church. The interior of the church, except for the pulpit and the altarpiece, is mainly free from the post-Reformation decorations seen in most other stave churches. An authentic medieval square-shaped baptismal font made of soapstone is still a part of the interior.Borgund stave church is owned by Fortidsminneforeningen (The Society for the Preservation of Norwegian Ancient Monuments)."The wood buildings of Norway lay claim to a certain monumental and historical importance, partly because they belong to the oldest class of buildings of this description, and partly owing to the purpose for which they were erected, namely, to serve as churches. The case is different as regards the merit of their artistic construction and beauty of shape, in both of which points the standard attained is not a high one, as shown by [this image]. The details principally show traces of the architectural styles prevalent at the time of their erection, viz., the Romanesque and Byzantine, while the main forms must be considered as the result of a severe climate. The perishable nature of the material employed was also naturally prejudicial to any advanced and regular development of architectural skills. From these causes the whole design assumed a pyramidal shape, whilst the climate necessitated mode of construction which is peculiar to the buildings in question. As a projection against its rigours the structures were surrounded by covered passages ornamented externally with those little arcades which are a distinguishing feature of the Romanesque style, whilst the roofs were necessarily very steep in shape on account of the heavy falls of snow, and were covered with wood shingles, tiles, or slates. The form of construction is rather rough, for the corners are generally formed of rude logs, whilst the walls between merely consist of upright boards jointed to one another. Churches of this description are know in Norway by the name of Fascine Churches. Although the construction is thus artless, yet an effort to enrich the whole by individual details and by employment of painted embellishments is frequently to be noticed. This especially effected by means of arabesque-like carvings on the doorways and gables."

Wood Church at Burgund

Borgund stave church is a stave church located in Borgund, Lærdal, Norway. It is classified as…

The Cathedral was founded in 680 with Bishop Bosel as its head. The first cathedral was built in this period but nothing now remains of it. The existing crypt of the cathedral dates from the 10th century and the time of St Oswald, bishop of Worcester. The current cathedral dates from the 12th and 13th centuries.

Worcester Cathedral

The Cathedral was founded in 680 with Bishop Bosel as its head. The first cathedral was built in this…

York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is the second largest of its kind in Northern Europe. It is the seat of the Archbishop of York, and cathedral for the Diocese of York, and is run by a Dean and Chapter under the Dean of York. Its formal title is The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St. Peter in York.

West Front of York Minster

York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is the second largest of its kind in Northern…