20 illustrations from Greek mythology including: Endymion, Erato, Eros, Europa, Euterpe, Fates, Faunus, Fury Galatea, Ganymede, Giant, Glaucus, and Griffin

"Endymion" — Gayley, 1893

Endymion

"Endymion" — Gayley, 1893

Muse of lyric poetry and mimicry

Erato

Muse of lyric poetry and mimicry

Muse of lyric poetry and mimicry

Erato

Muse of lyric poetry and mimicry

"Eros with bow" — Gayley, 1893

Eros Bow

"Eros with bow" — Gayley, 1893

Europa and Zeus in the form of a bull.

Europa

Europa and Zeus in the form of a bull.

Muse of music and lyric poetry

Euterpe

Muse of music and lyric poetry

Muse of music and lyric poetry

Euterpe

Muse of music and lyric poetry

The three fates of Greek Mythology were three sisters who spun the thread of life named Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. "Clotho spun the thread of life; Lachesis decided its fate, and Atropos with her great shears cut the thread." -Foster, 1921

Fates

The three fates of Greek Mythology were three sisters who spun the thread of life named Clotho, Lachesis,…

"Sylvanus and Faunus were Latin divinities, whose characteristics are so nearly the same as Pan that we may safely consider them as the same personage under different names." —Bulfinch, 1897

Faunus

"Sylvanus and Faunus were Latin divinities, whose characteristics are so nearly the same as Pan that…

"A Fury" — Gayley, 1893

Fury

"A Fury" — Gayley, 1893

"Galatea and Polyphemus" — Gayley, 1893

Galatea

"Galatea and Polyphemus" — Gayley, 1893

"Hebe was dismissed from her office in consequence of a fall which she met with one day when in attendance on the gods. Her successor was Ganmedes, a Trojan boy whom Jupiter, in the disguise of an eagle, siezed and carried off from the midst of his playfellows on Mount Ida, bore up to heaven, and installed in the vacant place." —Bulfinch, 1897

Ganymede

"Hebe was dismissed from her office in consequence of a fall which she met with one day when in attendance…

"From an ancient sarcophagus, represents Ganymede giving drink to the eagle, or bird of Jobe, and Hebe in disgrace, lying upon the ground." — Anthon, 1891

Ganymede and Eagle

"From an ancient sarcophagus, represents Ganymede giving drink to the eagle, or bird of Jobe, and Hebe…

"Giant in battle with Artemis, from a relief in the Vatican, Rome." -Foster, 1921

Giant

"Giant in battle with Artemis, from a relief in the Vatican, Rome." -Foster, 1921

Fisherman turned sea-god

Glaucus

Fisherman turned sea-god

"The Gods bring Wedding Gifts" — Gayley, 1893

Gods Wedding

"The Gods bring Wedding Gifts" — Gayley, 1893

"The Greek Underworld" — Gayley, 1893

Greek Underworld

"The Greek Underworld" — Gayley, 1893

"Griffin, from a Greek Sarcophagus. GRIFFIN. In mythology, an imaginary animal supposed to be generated between the lion and the eagle, and to combine the head, front, and wings of an eagle with the body and hind quarters of a lion." -Whitney, 1911

Griffin

"Griffin, from a Greek Sarcophagus. GRIFFIN. In mythology, an imaginary animal supposed to be generated…

In heraldry, the griffin is a fabulous animal, with the head and forefeet of an eagle, and the body, hind legs, and tail of a lion. The head is represented with pricked ears, symbolical of its vigilance. In mythology, the griffin was a creature similar in form to the griffin of heraldry, which was supposed to find its especial function in watching over hidden treasure, especially in Scythia. It was dedicated to the sun-god Apollo, whose chariot appears in early art as drawn by griffins. It was a favorite ornamental 'theme' in ancient Babylonian and Persian art, and is also found in a similar way on art objects of the Phoenicians, the Mycenæan civilization, and the ancient Greeks. The Romans and art-workers of the renaissance used it as a purely decorative device.

Griffin

In heraldry, the griffin is a fabulous animal, with the head and forefeet of an eagle, and the body,…

"The griffin is a monster with the body of a lion, the head and wings of an eagle, and back covered with feathers." —Bulfinch, 1897

Gryphon

"The griffin is a monster with the body of a lion, the head and wings of an eagle, and back covered…