57 illustrations from Greek mythology including: Hades, Harmonia, Harpies, Hebe, Hecate, Hector, Helen, Helios, Hephaistus, Hera, Heracles, Hercules, Hermes, Hero, Hippolyta, Hours, Hygieia, Hypnos, Io, Iphegnia, Iris, and Ixion

"Hades" — Gayley, 1893

Hades

"Hades" — Gayley, 1893

"Hades and Persephone" — Gayley, 1893

Hades

"Hades and Persephone" — Gayley, 1893

"Harmonia in Company of Deities" — Gayley, 1893

Harmonia

"Harmonia in Company of Deities" — Gayley, 1893

"These were disgusting birds, with the heads of maidens, with long claws and faces pale with hunger. They were sent by the gods to torment a certain Phineus." —Bulfinch, 1897

Harpies

"These were disgusting birds, with the heads of maidens, with long claws and faces pale with hunger.…

Greek goddess of youth and cup bearer of the gods.

Hebe

Greek goddess of youth and cup bearer of the gods.

"When once the mortal part of him has perished, Juno lays aside her enmity and marries him to Hebe, her own daughter and the embodiment of youth." —Bulfinch, 1897

Hebe

"When once the mortal part of him has perished, Juno lays aside her enmity and marries him to Hebe,…

"He promised her marriage, and as they stood before the alter of Hecate, called the goddess to witness his oath." —Bulfinch, 1897

Hecate

"He promised her marriage, and as they stood before the alter of Hecate, called the goddess to witness…

"Hector's Farewell" — Gayley, 1893

Hector

"Hector's Farewell" — Gayley, 1893

"Helen Persuaded" — Gayley, 1893

Helen

"Helen Persuaded" — Gayley, 1893

Helen of Troy at the Scaean Gate.

Helen of Troy

Helen of Troy at the Scaean Gate.

"Helios the Sun-God." —Bulfinch, 1897

Helios

"Helios the Sun-God." —Bulfinch, 1897

"The Sun-god." —Bulfinch, 1897

Helios or sol

"The Sun-god." —Bulfinch, 1897

God of Fire

Hephaistus

God of Fire

Goddess of Marriage and Birth

Hera

Goddess of Marriage and Birth

Hera with peacock

Hera

Hera with peacock

Hera standing

Hera

Hera standing

Hera (Juno), a greek goddess.

Hera

Hera (Juno), a greek goddess.

"Hera" — Morey, 1903

Hera

"Hera" — Morey, 1903

"Hera of Argos" — Gayley, 1893

Hera argos

"Hera of Argos" — Gayley, 1893

"Hera of the Vatican" — Gayley, 1893

Hera vatican

"Hera of the Vatican" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles and the Nemean Lion" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles and the Nemean Lion" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles and the Hydra" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles and the Hydra" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles bringing Home the Boar" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles bringing Home the Boar" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles with the Bull" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles with the Bull" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles and Cerberus" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles and Cerberus" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles and Antaeus" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles and Antaeus" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles and Nessus" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"Heracles and Nessus" — Gayley, 1893

"The Wedding of Hercules and Hebe" — Gayley, 1893

Heracles

"The Wedding of Hercules and Hebe" — Gayley, 1893

"Heracles" — Morey, 1903

Heracles

"Heracles" — Morey, 1903

Heracles and Achelous.

Heracles and Achelous

Heracles and Achelous.

"Hercules" — Gayley, 1893

Hercules

"Hercules" — Gayley, 1893

"Hercules descended into Hades, accompanied by Mercury and Minerva. He obtained permission from Pluto to carry Cerberus to the upper air provided he could do it without the use of weapons; and in spite of the monster's struggling, he seized him, held him fast, and carried him to Eurystheus, and afterward brought him back again." —Bulfinch, 1897

Hercules and Cerberus

"Hercules descended into Hades, accompanied by Mercury and Minerva. He obtained permission from Pluto…

"Hercules, a Theban prince, was another of the descendants of Pelops. The numerous and extraordinary feats of strength and valor of Hercules excited the admiration of his contemporaries, and, being afterwards exaggerated and embellished by poets, caused him at length to be regarded as a person endowed with supernatual powers, and even to be worshipped as a god." — Goodrich, 1844

Young Hercules

"Hercules, a Theban prince, was another of the descendants of Pelops. The numerous and extraordinary…

Messenger of the gods

Hermes

Messenger of the gods

Herald of the Olympian gods, shown with the child Dionysus.

Hermes

Herald of the Olympian gods, shown with the child Dionysus.

Statue of Hermes (Mercury).

Hermes

Statue of Hermes (Mercury).

"Hermes of Praxiteles" — Gayley, 1893

Hermes

"Hermes of Praxiteles" — Gayley, 1893

"Hermes of Praxiteles" — Morey, 1903

Hermes

"Hermes of Praxiteles" — Morey, 1903

The messenger of the gods in Greek mythology.

Hermes

The messenger of the gods in Greek mythology.

"Hermes kills Argus" — Gayley, 1893

Hermes Argus

"Hermes kills Argus" — Gayley, 1893

"Hermes and Dog" — Gayley, 1893

Hermes Dog

"Hermes and Dog" — Gayley, 1893

"Hermes conducting a Soul to Charon" — Gayley, 1893

Hermes soul

"Hermes conducting a Soul to Charon" — Gayley, 1893

"Hero and Leander" — Gayley, 1893

Hero Leander

"Hero and Leander" — Gayley, 1893

"Hippolyta, the queen, received him kindly, and consented to yield her girdle, but Juno, taking the form of an Amazon, went and persuaded the rest that the strangers were carrying off their queen." —Bulfinch, 1897

Hippolyta and the girdle

"Hippolyta, the queen, received him kindly, and consented to yield her girdle, but Juno, taking the…

"In the evening Aurora came, accompanied by the Hours and the Pleiades, and wept and lamented over her son." —Bulfinch, 1897

The Hours

"In the evening Aurora came, accompanied by the Hours and the Pleiades, and wept and lamented over her…

"Hygea and Aesculapius." —Bulfinch, 1897

Hygea and Aesculapius

"Hygea and Aesculapius." —Bulfinch, 1897

Greek goddess of health. Daughter of Asklepios and granddaughter of Apollo.

Hygieia

Greek goddess of health. Daughter of Asklepios and granddaughter of Apollo.

"In the classical mythology, the goddess of Health- the daughter of Aesculapius. She was worshipped at Athens, Corinth, Argos, and other important cities, and in works of art is usually represented as a blooming virgin, with a snake, the symbol of health, which drinks from a cup held in her hand." — Chambers, 1881

Hygieia

"In the classical mythology, the goddess of Health- the daughter of Aesculapius. She was worshipped…

"Hermes conducting a Soul to Charon" — Gayley, 1893

Hypnos

"Hermes conducting a Soul to Charon" — Gayley, 1893

"Io, Argus, and Mercury" — Gayley, 1893

Io Argus

"Io, Argus, and Mercury" — Gayley, 1893

"What in this letter is contained, what here, Is written, all I will repeat to thee, That thou mayst bear my message to my friends, 'Gainst danger thus I guard: if thou preserve, The letter, that though silent will declare, My purport; if it perish in the sea, Saving thyself, my words too thou wilt save." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Iphegnia delivers letter to Pylades

"What in this letter is contained, what here, Is written, all I will repeat to thee, That thou mayst…

"The Sacrifice of Iphigenia" — Gayley, 1893

Iphigenia

"The Sacrifice of Iphigenia" — Gayley, 1893

"When she was about to be slain at the altar, Artemis intervened and carried her off in a cloud to be priestess of her temple in Tauris (the Crimea), while a stag was substituted in the sacrifice." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Rescue of Iphigenia

"When she was about to be slain at the altar, Artemis intervened and carried her off in a cloud to be…

"The cut represents a painting from a wall at Pompeii, the subject of which is the sacrifice of Iphigenia, and which probably was copied in some degree from the famous painting of Timanthes. Calchas stands near the altar, holding the sacrificial knife; Diomede and Ulysses have Iphigenia in their grasp, and are about to place her on the altar; Agamemnon turns away his head enveloped in the folds of his mantle, while Diana is seen in the air, causing a nymph to bring her the hind that is to be substituted for the maiden." — Anthon, 1891

Sacrifice of Iphigenia

"The cut represents a painting from a wall at Pompeii, the subject of which is the sacrifice of Iphigenia,…

"When she was about to be sacrificed the goddess relented and snatched her away, leaving a hind in her place, and Iphigenia, enveloped in a cloud, was carried to Tauris, where Diana made her a priestess of her temple." —Bulfinch, 1897

Sacrifice of Iphigenia

"When she was about to be sacrificed the goddess relented and snatched her away, leaving a hind in her…

"Iris puts on her robe of many colors, and tingeing the sky with her bow, seeks the palace of the King fo Sleep." —Bulfinch, 1897

Iris

"Iris puts on her robe of many colors, and tingeing the sky with her bow, seeks the palace of the King…

"Ixion on the Wheel" — Gayley, 1893

Ixion

"Ixion on the Wheel" — Gayley, 1893