"Acropolis, 'the highest point of the city.' Many of the important cities of Greece and Asia Minor were protected by strongholds, so named. The A. occupied a lofty position, commanding the city and its environs; inaccessible on all sides except one, which had, for the most part, artificial defences. It contained some of the most important public buildings, especially temples, besides affording a last refuge in case of a hostile attack." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Acropolis

"Acropolis, 'the highest point of the city.' Many of the important cities of Greece and Asia Minor were…

"The Acropolis of Athens Restored." — Smith, 1882

Acropolis restored

"The Acropolis of Athens Restored." — Smith, 1882

An image of the Acropolis, as it was, seated in Athens, Greece. The Acropolis is an ancient, famed citadel that rests on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens, and is a part of the World Heritage List.

The Acropolis

An image of the Acropolis, as it was, seated in Athens, Greece. The Acropolis is an ancient, famed citadel…

This Greek akroter is painted in Acropolis, Athens. It serves as the ornamental finish to the apex of a gable.

Greek Akroter

This Greek akroter is painted in Acropolis, Athens. It serves as the ornamental finish to the apex of…

This Greek antefix is found in the propylaea which is the entrance to the Acropolis of Athens. This design is found on the lower roof line in front of the imbrices (overlapping roof tiles).

Greek Antefix

This Greek antefix is found in the propylaea which is the entrance to the Acropolis of Athens. This…

"The Temple of Theseus, the Areopagus, and the Acropolis of Athens." -Breasted, 1914

Athens

"The Temple of Theseus, the Areopagus, and the Acropolis of Athens." -Breasted, 1914

"Athens restored, from the Pnyx." — Smith, 1882

Athens restored

"Athens restored, from the Pnyx." — Smith, 1882

"The 'house of Erechtheus'; a temple of Ionic order on the Acropolis of Athens, noted as one of the most original achievements of Hellenic architecture." -Whitney, 1911

Erechtheum

"The 'house of Erechtheus'; a temple of Ionic order on the Acropolis of Athens, noted as one of the…

"The building of the new Erechtheum was not commenced till the Parthenon and Propylea were finished, and probably not before the year preceding the breaking out of the Peloponnesian war. Its progress was no doubt delayed by that event, and it was probably not completed before 393 B.C. When finished it presented one of the finest models of the Ionic order, as the Parthenon was of the Doric. It stood to the north of the Acropolis." — Smith, 1882

Erechtheum restored

"The building of the new Erechtheum was not commenced till the Parthenon and Propylea were finished,…

"The first public monuments that arose after the Persian wars were erected under the auspices of Cimon, who was, like Pericles, a lover and patron of the arts. The principal of these were the small Ionic temple of Nike Apteros (Wingless Victory), and the Theseum, or Temple of Theseus. The temple of Nike Apteros was only 27 feet in length by 18 in breadth, and was erected on the Acropolis in commemoration of Cimon's victory at the Eurymedon." — Smith, 1882

Temple of Nike Apteros

"The first public monuments that arose after the Persian wars were erected under the auspices of Cimon,…

"The Parthenon is a celebrated temple at Athens, consecrated to Athena or Minerva, the protectress of the city, built on an elevated rock near the Acropolis, and has always been regarded as the most exquisite and perfect example of Grecian architecture. The Parthenon was erected about 448 B. C., in the time of Pericles, Phidias being the chief sculptor. It had a length of 228 feet, by a breadth of 100; it had eight columns beneath each pediment, and 15 on each side, exclusive of those at each end of the pediments, with which they formed 16 intercolumns, of 46 columns in all, exclusive of those within the building. This magnificent fane had resisted the ravages of time down to the 17th century, being by turns a pagan temple, a Christian church, and also a Turkish mosque, till at the siege of Athens by the Venetians, in 1687, a shell fell on the roof of the Acropolis or citadel, which, firing the magazine beneath, shattered that building and the Parthenon into blackened ruins."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Parthenon

"The Parthenon is a celebrated temple at Athens, consecrated to Athena or Minerva, the protectress of…

"The Parthenon stood on this highest part of the Acropolis, near its centre, and probably occupied the site of an earlier temple destroyed by the Persians. It was entirely of Pentelic marble, on a rustic basement of ordinary limestone, and its architecture, which was of the Doric order, was of purest kind." — Smith, 1882

Parthenon restored

"The Parthenon stood on this highest part of the Acropolis, near its centre, and probably occupied the…

Rower in an Athenian warship, about 400 B.C. (fragment of relief found on the Acropolis).

Greek Rowers

Rower in an Athenian warship, about 400 B.C. (fragment of relief found on the Acropolis).

The Greek square panel is found on the coffer of the Propylaea ceiling, the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. The design is of many rays of stars.

Greek Square Panel

The Greek square panel is found on the coffer of the Propylaea ceiling, the entrance to the Acropolis…

The Greek square panel is found on the coffer of the Propylaea ceiling, the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. This panel is divided into eight equal spaces that are decorated with a repeated design.

Greek Square Panel

The Greek square panel is found on the coffer of the Propylaea ceiling, the entrance to the Acropolis…

The Greek square panel is found on the coffer of the Propylaea ceiling, the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. This panel is divided into eight equal spaces that are decorated with a repeated design.

Greek Square Panel

The Greek square panel is found on the coffer of the Propylaea ceiling, the entrance to the Acropolis…

An illustration of the theater of Dionysus at Athens.

Theater of Dionysus

An illustration of the theater of Dionysus at Athens.

"Athens is said to have derrived its name from the prominence given to its worship of Athena by its king erechtheus. The inhabitants were previously called Crannai and Cecropidae, from Cecrops, who, according to tradition, was the original founder of the city. This at first occupied the hill or rock which afterwards became the <em>Acropolis</em>, but gradually the buildings began to spread over the ground at the southern foot of this hill. It was not till the time of Pisitratus and his sons (B.C. 560-514) that the city began to assume any degree of splendour. The most remarkable of these building deposits was the gigantic temple of the Olympian Zeus, which, however, was not finished till many centuries later."&mdash; Smith, 1882

Temple of the Olympian Zeus

"Athens is said to have derrived its name from the prominence given to its worship of Athena by its…