"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under command of Colonel Beard, in the United States transport steamer <em>Darlington</em>, picking off Confederate sharpshooters concealed in the trees on the banks of the Sapelo River, Ga."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

African American Volunteers

"A detachment of the First South Carolina [African American] Federal Volunteers, under command of Colonel…

"The war in Virginia. The Twenty-second [African American] Regiment, Duncan's Brigade, carrying the first line of Confederate works before Petersburg. On the morning of the 15th of June, 1864, General Hinks formed his command in line of battle, and advanced upon the Confederates, with Duncan commanding his right and Holman his left. The result of this charge was waited for with great anxiety. The majority of the whites expected that the [African American] troops would run, but the sable forces astonished everybody by their achievements. With a wild yell that must have struck terror into the hearts of their foes, the Twenty-second and Fifth United States [African American] regiments, commanded by Colonels Kidder and Connor, charged, under a hot fire of musketry and artillery, over the Confederate ditch and parapet, and drove the enemy before them, capturing a large field-piece, and taking entire possession of their works, its defenders, Ferrybee's Fourth North Carolina Cavalry, and Graham's Petersburg Battery, seeking safety in rapid flight, leaving their dead and wounded in the works."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Duncan's Brigade

"The war in Virginia. The Twenty-second [African American] Regiment, Duncan's Brigade, carrying the…

"Assault of the Second Louisiana [African American] Regiment on the Confederate works at Fort Hudson, May 27th, 1863. The Battle of Fort Hudson was a severe and well-fought action. The Federal troops displayed their usual bravery, and were well handled by General Banks, driving the enemy to his second line of works. Of the [African American] regiments General Banks, in his official report, says: 'They answered every expectation. Their conduct was heroic. No troops could be more determined or more daring. They made during the day three charges upon the batteries of the enemy, suffering very heavy losses, and holding their position at nightfall with the other troops on the right of our line. The highest commendation is bestowed upon them by all officers in command on the right. Whatever doubt may have existed heretofore as to the efficiency of organizations of this character, the history of this day proves conclusively to those who were in a condition to observe the conduct of these regiments that the Government will find in this class of troops effective supporters and defenders. The severe test to which they were subjected, and the determined manner with which they encountered the enemy leave upon my mind no doubt of their ultimate success. They require only good officers, commands of limited numbers, and careful discipline to make them excellent soldiers.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hudson

"Assault of the Second Louisiana [African American] Regiment on the Confederate works at Fort Hudson,…

"Siege of Petersburg. The [African American] infantry bringing in captured guns and cheers of the Ohio troops. When the [African American] troops found themselves within the works of the enemy no words could paint their delight. Numbers of them kissed the guns they had captured with extravagant satisfaction, and a feverish anxiety was minfested to get ahead and charge some more of the Confederate works. A number of the [African American] troops were wounded and a few killed in the first charge. A large crowd congregated, with looks of unutterable admiration, about Sergeant Richardson and Corporal Wobey, of the Twenty-second United States [African American] regiment, who had carried the colors of their regiment and been the first men in the works. Our artist gives a sketch of this gallant action."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Petersburg

"Siege of Petersburg. The [African American] infantry bringing in captured guns and cheers of the Ohio…

"Siege of Petersburg- the Ninth Corps charging on the enemy's works after the explosion of the mine, July 30th, 1864. Immediately after the explosion of the mine a hundred cannons opened along the Federal front, and at half-past five the Ninth Corps charged, carrying the fort with a part of the line on each side. The Second Division, which was in the centre, advanced and carried the second line a short distance beyond the fort, and rested, holding ground with the utmost determination. It was at the time the [African American] Division, under General White, was pushed forward and ordered to charge and carry the crest of the hill, which would have decided the contest. The troops advanced in good order as far as the first line, where they received a galling fire, which checked them, and although quite a number kept on advancing, the greater number seemed to become utterly demoralized, part taking refuge in the fort, and the remainder running to the rear as fast as possible. They were rallied and again pushed forward, but without success, the greater part of the officers being killed or wounded."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Petersburg

"Siege of Petersburg- the Ninth Corps charging on the enemy's works after the explosion of the mine,…

"Siege of Petersburg- the Ninth Corps charging on the enemy's works after the explosion of the mine, July 30th, 1864. Immediately after the explosion of the mine a hundred cannons opened along the Federal front, and at half-past five the Ninth Corps charged, carrying the fort with a part of the line on each side. The Second Division, which was in the centre, advanced and carried the second line a short distance beyond the fort, and rested, holding ground with the utmost determination. It was at the time the [African American] Division, under General White, was pushed forward and ordered to charge and carry the crest of the hill, which would have decided the contest. The troops advanced in good order as far as the first line, where they received a galling fire, which checked them, and although quite a number kept on advancing, the greater number seemed to become utterly demoralized, part taking refuge in the fort, and the remainder running to the rear as fast as possible. They were rallied and again pushed forward, but without success, the greater part of the officers being killed or wounded."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Petersburg

"Siege of Petersburg- the Ninth Corps charging on the enemy's works after the explosion of the mine,…

"Siege of Petersburg- the Ninth Corps charging on the enemy's works after the explosion of the mine, July 30th, 1864. Immediately after the explosion of the mine a hundred cannons opened along the Federal front, and at half-past five the Ninth Corps charged, carrying the fort with a part of the line on each side. The Second Division, which was in the centre, advanced and carried the second line a short distance beyond the fort, and rested, holding ground with the utmost determination. It was at the time the [African American] Division, under General White, was pushed forward and ordered to charge and carry the crest of the hill, which would have decided the contest. The troops advanced in good order as far as the first line, where they received a galling fire, which checked them, and although quite a number kept on advancing, the greater number seemed to become utterly demoralized, part taking refuge in the fort, and the remainder running to the rear as fast as possible. They were rallied and again pushed forward, but without success, the greater part of the officers being killed or wounded."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Petersburg

"Siege of Petersburg- the Ninth Corps charging on the enemy's works after the explosion of the mine,…

"Presentation of colors to the Twentieth United States [African American] Infantry, Colonel Bartram, at the Union League Clubhouse, New York, March 5th, 1864. The Twentieth Regiment, United States [African American] Troops, left Riker's Island at nine o'clock on the 5th of March, 1864, on board the steamer <em>John Romer</em>, and were conveyed to the foot of Twenty-first Street, East River, New York, where they were disembarked and formed in regimental line, and marched to Union Square, arriving in front of the Union League Clubhouse at one o'clock. A vast crowd of citizens, of every shade of color and every phase of social and political life, filled the square and streets, and every door, window, veranda, tree and housetop that commanded a view of the scene was peopled with spectators. Over the entrance of the clubhouse was a large platform, ornamented with flags and filled with ladies. In the street was another platform, tastefully decorated and occupied by prominent citizens. From the stand the colors were presented by President King of Columbia College, who addressed them with warmth and eloquence. After the presentation ceremony was over the men stacked arms and partook of a collation provided for them."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Presentation of Colors

"Presentation of colors to the Twentieth United States [African American] Infantry, Colonel Bartram,…