Carl Schurz (March 2, 1829 – May 14, 1906) was a German revolutionary, American statesman and reformer, and Union Army General in the American Civil War.

Carl Schurz

Carl Schurz (March 2, 1829 – May 14, 1906) was a German revolutionary, American statesman and…

John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union Army general in the American Civil War. His death at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House is often considered a well known tale of irony.

Scene of Sedgwick's Death

John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and…

John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union Army general in the American Civil War.

General John Sedgwick

John Sedgwick (September 13, 1813 – May 9, 1864) was a teacher, a career military officer, and a Union…

Raphael Semmes (September 27, 1809 – August 30, 1877) was an officer in the United States Navy from 1826 to 1860 and the Confederate States Navy from 1860 to 1865.

Raphael Semmes

Raphael Semmes (September 27, 1809 – August 30, 1877) was an officer in the United States Navy…

William Rufus Shafter (October 16, 1835 – November 12, 1906) was a Union Army officer during the American Civil War who received America's highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions at the Battle of Fair Oaks.

William Rufus Shafter

William Rufus Shafter (October 16, 1835 – November 12, 1906) was a Union Army officer during the…

An illustration of General Sheridan with soldiers on horses.

Philip Sheridan

An illustration of General Sheridan with soldiers on horses.

(1831-1888) Union soldier who forced out the Confederates from the Shenandoah Valley

Philip H. Sheridan

(1831-1888) Union soldier who forced out the Confederates from the Shenandoah Valley

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65). He is pictured here with his generals.

Sherman and His Generals

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65).…

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters during the March to the Sea.

Sherman's Headquarters

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters during the March to the Sea.

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters in Savannah.

Sherman's Headquarters in Savannah

William Tecumseh Sherman's headquarters in Savannah.

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Here his troops are burning a railroad station.

Sherman's Troops Burning a Railroad Station

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Here his…

William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator and author. He served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65), for which he received recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy as well as criticism for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies that he implemented in conducting total war against the Confederate States. Military historian Basil Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general".

General Sherman

William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman,…

(1820-1891) Served as a general for the United States Army during the American Civil War.

General William Tecumseh Sherman

(1820-1891) Served as a general for the United States Army during the American Civil War.

Daniel Edgar Sickles (October 20, 1819 – May 3, 1914) was a colorful and controversial American politician, Union General in the American Civil War, and diplomat.

Daniel Edgar Sickles

Daniel Edgar Sickles (October 20, 1819 – May 3, 1914) was a colorful and controversial American…

Franz Sigel (November 18, 1824 – August 21, 1902) was a German military officer and immigrant to the United States who was a teacher, newspaperman, politician, and served as a Union major general in the American Civil War.

Franz Sigel

Franz Sigel (November 18, 1824 – August 21, 1902) was a German military officer and immigrant to the…

Henry Warner Slocum (September 24, 1827 – April 14, 1894), was a Union general during the American Civil War and later served in the United States House of Representatives from New York.

Henry Warner Slocum

Henry Warner Slocum (September 24, 1827 – April 14, 1894), was a Union general during the American…

Governor Smith leaving Richmond during the American Civil War campaign against Richmond.

Governor Smith Leaving Richmond

Governor Smith leaving Richmond during the American Civil War campaign against Richmond.

An illustration of a group of soldiers in front of a house with slaves.

Soldiers & House

An illustration of a group of soldiers in front of a house with slaves.

An illustration of soldiers on horses.

Soldiers on Horses

An illustration of soldiers on horses.

On the day that South Carolina proclaimed sovereignty, a banner for the new state was adopted.

South Carolina Flag

On the day that South Carolina proclaimed sovereignty, a banner for the new state was adopted.

The Battle of South Mountain (known in several early Southern accounts as the Battle of Boonsboro Gap) was fought September 14, 1862, as part of the Maryland Campaign of the American Civil War.

Battle of South Mountain

The Battle of South Mountain (known in several early Southern accounts as the Battle of Boonsboro Gap)…

The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania, was the second battle in Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's 1864 Overland Campaign of the American Civil War.

Spotsylvania Courthouse

The Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, sometimes simply referred to as the Battle of Spotsylvania,…

The <em>Star of the West</em> was a civilian ship hired by the United States government to transport military supplies and reinforcements to the garrison of Fort Sumter before the American Civil War.

The Star of the West

The Star of the West was a civilian ship hired by the United States government to transport…

Frederick Steele (January 14, 1819 &ndash; January 19, 1868) was a career military officer in the United States Army, serving as a major general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Frederick Steele

Frederick Steele (January 14, 1819 – January 19, 1868) was a career military officer in the United…

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was an American politician from Georgia. He was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.

Alexander Hamilton Stephens

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was an American politician from Georgia.…

George Stoneman, Jr. (August 22, 1822 – September 5, 1894) was a career United States Army officer, a Union cavalry general in the American Civil War, and the Governor of California between 1883 and 1887.

General George Stoneman

George Stoneman, Jr. (August 22, 1822 – September 5, 1894) was a career United States Army officer,…

Samuel Davis Sturgis (June 11, 1822 &ndash; September 28, 1889) was an American military officer who served in the Mexican-American War, as a Union general in the American Civil War, and later in the Indian Wars.

Samuel Davis Sturgis

Samuel Davis Sturgis (June 11, 1822 – September 28, 1889) was an American military officer who…

An illustration of a missionary tent in a Civil War camp.

Missionary Tent

An illustration of a missionary tent in a Civil War camp.

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

The prison at Millen

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

(1816-1870) Known as the "Rock of Chickamauga," he was a U.S. Army office and Union general during the American Civil War.

General George Henry Thomas

(1816-1870) Known as the "Rock of Chickamauga," he was a U.S. Army office and Union general during the…

George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 &ndash; March 28, 1870) was a career United States Army officer and a Union General during the American Civil War, one of the principal commanders in the Western Theater. Thomas served in the Mexican-American War and later chose to remain with the United States Army for the Civil War, despite his heritage as a Virginian.

George Henry Thomas

George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 – March 28, 1870) was a career United States Army officer and…

Robert Augustus Toombs (July 2, 1810 &ndash; December 15, 1885) was an American political leader, Secretary of State of the Confederacy, and a Confederate general in the Civil War.

Robert Augustus Toombs

Robert Augustus Toombs (July 2, 1810 – December 15, 1885) was an American political leader, Secretary…

A torpedo boat is a relatively small and fast naval ship designed to carry torpedoes into battle.<br>Top: A, platform; B, torpedo; C, water tight pine box; D, pin to be drawn.<br>Lower: A, vessel at anchor; B, her cable; E, F, two torpedoes; C, D, the coupling lines.

Torpedo Boat

A torpedo boat is a relatively small and fast naval ship designed to carry torpedoes into battle. Top:…

David Emanuel Twiggs (1790 &ndash; July 15, 1862) was a United States soldier during the War of 1812 and Mexican-American War and a general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He was one of the oldest generals on either side in the Civil War.

David Emanuel Twiggs

David Emanuel Twiggs (1790 – July 15, 1862) was a United States soldier during the War of 1812…

The second USS <em>Louisiana</em> was a propeller-driven iron hull steamer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War.

The Louisiana

The second USS Louisiana was a propeller-driven iron hull steamer in the United States Navy…

USS <em>New Era</em> (1862) was a steamer acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War. She was used by the Union Navy as a gunboat in support of the Union Navy blockade of Confederate waterways.

The New Era

USS New Era (1862) was a steamer acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War.…

The first USS Sabine was a sailing frigate built by the United States Navy in 1855.

The School-Ship USS Sabine

The first USS Sabine was a sailing frigate built by the United States Navy in 1855.

Clement Laird Vallandigham (July 29, 1820 &ndash; June 17, 1871) was an Ohio unionist of the Copperhead faction of anti-war, pro-Confederate Democrats during the American Civil War.

Clement Laird Vallandigham

Clement Laird Vallandigham (July 29, 1820 – June 17, 1871) was an Ohio unionist of the Copperhead…

Stephen Van Rensselaer III (November 1, 1765 &ndash; January 26, 1839) was Lieutenant Governor of New York as well as a statesman, soldier, and land-owner, the heir to one of the greatest estates in the New York region at the time. He was the father of Henry Bell Van Rensselaer, who was a politician and general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Stephen Van Rensselaer

Stephen Van Rensselaer III (November 1, 1765 – January 26, 1839) was Lieutenant Governor of New…

During the siege, Union gunboats lobbed over 22,000 shells into the town and army artillery fire was even heavier. As the barrages continued, suitable housing in Vicksburg was reduced to a minimum. A ridge, located between the main town and the rebel defense line, provided a diverse citizenry with lodging for the duration. Over 500 caves were dug into the yellow clay hills of Vicksburg. Whether houses were structurally sound or not, it was deemed safer to occupy these dugouts.

Cave Life in Vicksburg

During the siege, Union gunboats lobbed over 22,000 shells into the town and army artillery fire was…

Union forces bombarded the city all night, from 220 artillery pieces and naval gunfire from Rear Adm. David D. Porter's fleet in the river, and while causing little property damage, they damaged Confederate civilian morale. On the morning of May 22, the defenders were bombarded again for four hours before the Union attacked once more along a three-mile front at 10 a.m.

Porter's Fleet Shelling the Batteries Vicksburg

Union forces bombarded the city all night, from 220 artillery pieces and naval gunfire from Rear Adm.…

Benjamin Franklin "Bluff" Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States Senator from Ohio. In the Senate, he was associated with the Radical Republicans of that time. Wade, along with other politicians, witnessed the defeat of the Union Army at the First Battle of Bull Run. There, he was almost captured by the Confederate Army. Wade, along with most other Radical Republicans, was highly critical of President Andrew Johnson (who became President after Lincoln's assassination).

Benjamin Franklin Wade

Benjamin Franklin "Bluff" Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States…

John Grimes Walker (20 March 1835 &ndash; 16 September 1907) was an admiral in the United States Navy who served during the Civil War. After the war, he served as Chief of the Bureau of Navigation and head of the Lighthouse Board. In retirement, he led commissions to investigate the construction of a Central American canal connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

John Grimes Walker

John Grimes Walker (20 March 1835 – 16 September 1907) was an admiral in the United States Navy…

James Harrison Wilson (September 2, 1837 &ndash; February 23, 1925) was a United States Army topographic engineer, a Union Army General in the American Civil War and later wars, a railroad executive, and author.

James Harrison Wilson

James Harrison Wilson (September 2, 1837 – February 23, 1925) was a United States Army topographic…

An illustration of the USS Kearsarge and Captain Winslow.

Captain Winslow & USS Kearsarge

An illustration of the USS Kearsarge and Captain Winslow.

Rear Admiral John Ancrum Winslow (1811 &ndash; 29 September 1873) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. He was in command of the steam sloop of war USS Kearsarge during her historic 1864 action with the Confederate ship Alabama.

John Ancrum Winslow

Rear Admiral John Ancrum Winslow (1811 – 29 September 1873) was an officer in the United States…

Henry Alexander Wise (December 3, 1806 – September 12, 1876) was an American statesman from Virginia. Henry A. Wise served in the United States Congress from 1833 to 1844. Wise was active in securing the election of John Tyler as Vice President in 1840. Tyler appointed Wise as United States minister to Brazil from 1844 to 1847, where two of his children were born in Rio de Janeiro. After his return, Wise identified with the Democratic Party. In 1855, after a remarkable campaign, he was elected governor of Virginia over the Know Nothing candidate. Wise served as a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army. He commanded a brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia during the siege of Petersburg, and was promoted to the rank of Major General after the Battle of Sayler's Creek.

Henry Alexander Wise

Henry Alexander Wise (December 3, 1806 – September 12, 1876) was an American statesman from Virginia.…

John Ellis Wool (February 20, 1784 &ndash; November 10, 1869) was an officer in the United States Army during three consecutive U.S. wars: the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War and the oldest Union general of the American Civil War. By the time of the Mexican-American War, he was widely considered one of the most capable officers in the army and a superb organizer. He was one of the four general officers of the United States Army in 1861, and was the one who saw the most Civil War service. When the war began, Wool, at age 77, a brigadier general for 20 years, commanded the Department of the East.

John Ellis Wool

John Ellis Wool (February 20, 1784 – November 10, 1869) was an officer in the United States Army…

John Lorimer Worden (12 March 1818 &ndash; 19 October 1897) was a U.S. Admiral who served in the American Civil War. He commanded Monitor against the Confederate vessel Virginia (originally named Merrimack) in first battle of ironclad ships in 1862.

John Lorimer Worden

John Lorimer Worden (12 March 1818 – 19 October 1897) was a U.S. Admiral who served in the American…

Richard Yates (January 18, 1818 – November 27, 1873) was governor of Illinois during the American Civil War and has been considered the greatest war governor during that period. When the war began Gov. Yates sent more Illinois troops to aid the Union than any other state. He also represented Illinois in the United States House of Representatives, 1851–1855 and as a U.S. Senator, 1865–1871.

Richard Yates

Richard Yates (January 18, 1818 – November 27, 1873) was governor of Illinois during the American…

Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States Congressman from Tennessee, officer in the United States Army, and a Confederate brigadier general during the American Civil War. He led the first Confederate invasion of neutral Kentucky and was killed in action at the Battle of Mill Springs, the first Confederate general to perish in the Western Theater.

Felix Kirk Zollicoffer

Felix Kirk Zollicoffer (May 19, 1812 – January 19, 1862) was a newspaperman, three-term United States…