"Arms of the Washington family."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Arms

"Arms of the Washington family."—Lossing, 1851

An illustration of George Washington crossing the Delaware River on December 25, 1776. This event occurred during the American Revolutionary War and was the first move in a surprise attack by the Continental Army against Hessian forces in New Jersey.

George Washington Crossing the Delaware

An illustration of George Washington crossing the Delaware River on December 25, 1776. This event occurred…

The first move in a surprise attack against the Hessian forces at the Battle of Trenton.

Washington Crossing the Delaware

The first move in a surprise attack against the Hessian forces at the Battle of Trenton.

"The Washington Elm. The horse seen in this sketch is one of the oldest in Cambridge, having been built about 1750. It has been in the posession of the Moore family about seventy-five years. Since I visited Cambridge I have been informed that a Mrs. Moore was still living there, who, from the window of that house, saw the ceremony of Washington taking command of the army."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Elm

"The Washington Elm. The horse seen in this sketch is one of the oldest in Cambridge, having been built…

The Washington Elm

Washington Elm

The Washington Elm

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the back: Quod Parva Militum Manu Strenue Prospectus Hostes. Virtutis Ingenitæ Specionen Dedid In Pregna Ad Cowpens, 17th January, 1781- 'Because, having vigorously pursued the foe with a small band of soldiers, he gave a brilliant specimen of innate valor in the battle at the Cowpens, seventeenth January, 1781.' This inscription is within a laurel wreath."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Medal Back

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the back: Quod…

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the front: An officer mounted at the head of a body of cavalry, charging flying troops; Victory is flying over the heads of the Americans, holding a laurel crown in her right hand and a palm branch in her left. Legend: Gulielmo. Washington Legionis Equit. Præfecto Comitia Americana- The American Congress to William Washington commander of a regiment of cavalry."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Medal Front

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the front: An…

"Washington Monument. The following are the inscriptions on the monument: East front: 'To George Washington, by the State of Maryland. Born 23d February, 1732. Died 14th December, 1799.' South front: 'To George Washington, President of the United States, 4th March, 1789. Returned to Mount Vernon, 4th March, 1797.' West front: To George Washington. Trenton, 25th December, 1776. Yorktown, 19th October, 1781.' North Front: 'To George Washington. Commander-in-chief of the American armies, 15th June, 1775. Commission resigned at Annapolis, 23d December, 1783.'"—Lossing, 1851

Washington Monument

"Washington Monument. The following are the inscriptions on the monument: East front: 'To George Washington,…

"Washington resigning his commission."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Resigning

"Washington resigning his commission."—Lossing, 1851

At Fraunces Tavern on December 4, Washington formally bade his officers farewell and on December 23, 1783, he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief, emulating the Roman general Cincinnatus, an exemplar of the republican ideal of citizen leadership who rejected power. During this period, the United States was governed under the Articles of Confederation without a President, the forerunner to the Constitution.

Washington Resigning His Commission

At Fraunces Tavern on December 4, Washington formally bade his officers farewell and on December 23,…

"Greenough's statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Statue

"Greenough's statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

"Statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Statue

"Statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

This illustration shows George Washington taking command of his troups during the American Revolution.

Washington Taking Command

This illustration shows George Washington taking command of his troups during the American Revolution.

"The bier which Washington was carried to the tomb at Mount Vernon."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Bier

"The bier which Washington was carried to the tomb at Mount Vernon."—Lossing, 1851

"Site of Washington's birth place."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Birth Place

"Site of Washington's birth place."—Lossing, 1851

"Washington's Camp Chest, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Camp Chest

"Washington's Camp Chest, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

General Washington's farewell to his officers.

Washington's Farewell

General Washington's farewell to his officers.

"Washington's head-quarters. This view is from the Reading rail-road, looking east, and includes a portion of the range of hills in the rear whereon the Americans were encamped. The main building was erected in 1770; the wing is more modern, and occupies the place of the log addition mentioned by Mrs. Washington, in a letter to Mercy Warren, written in March, 1778: 'The general's apartment,' she wrote, 'is very small; he has had a log cabin built to dine in, which has made our quarters much more tolerable than they were at first.'"—Lossing, 1851

Washington's head-quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. This view is from the Reading rail-road, looking east, and includes a portion…

"Washington's head-quarters. I was informed by the venerable Anna van Antwerp, about a fortnight before her death, in the autumn of 1851, that Washington made his head-quarters, on first entering the city, at the spacious house (half of which is yet standing at 180 Pearl Street, opposite Cedar Street), delineated in the engraving. The large window, with no arch, toward the right, indicates the center of the original building. It is of brick, stuccoed, and roofed with tiles. There Washington remained until sommoned to visit Congress at Philadelphia, toward the last of May. On his return, he went to the Kennedy House, No. 1 Broadway, where he remained until the evacuation in September."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Head-Quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. I was informed by the venerable Anna van Antwerp, about a fortnight before…

"Washington's head-quarters. The house occupied by Washington while the army was at White Plains is yet standing. It is a frame building, on the east side of the road, about two miles above the village. This view is from the road, looking northeast. When I last visited it (1851), Miss Jemima Miller, a maiden ninety-three yeras of age, and her sister, a few years her junior, were living therein, the home of their childhood. A chair and table, used by the chief, is carefully preserved by the family, and a register for the names of the numerous visitors is kept. This house was in the deep solitude of the forests, among the hills, when Washington was there; now the heights and the plain near by smile with cultivation."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Head-Quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. The house occupied by Washington while the army was at White Plains is…

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

Washington's Headquarters at Newburg

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

"Banner of Washington's Life Guard."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Life Guard

"Banner of Washington's Life Guard."—Lossing, 1851

"Washington's Quarters. This is a view of the southwest front of the mansion. The room occupied by Washington is in the second story, opening out upon the piazza. It is about eighteen feet square, and in one corner is a Franklin stove. The situation of the house, upon an aminence an eighth of a mile eastward of the Millstone River, is very pelasant. It is now quite dilapidated; the piazzais unsafe to stand upon."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Quarters

"Washington's Quarters. This is a view of the southwest front of the mansion. The room occupied by Washington…

"Washington's writing case, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Writing-Case

"Washington's writing case, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

"View at Fort Washington. This is a view from the site of the interior works at Fort Washington from the foot of the flag-staff, loking southwest. In the foreground are seen the remains of the embankments. The tall mast seen near the river below is the support for telegraph wires which cross the Hudson there, from the rocky point of Jefrrey's Hook. In the distance across the river are the Palisades, and the mast upon their summit denotes the site of the redoubt north of Fort Lee. This little sketch exhibits the relative position of Forts Washington and Lee."—Lossing, 1851

Fort Washington

"View at Fort Washington. This is a view from the site of the interior works at Fort Washington from…

(1757-1777) Army leader during the American Revolution

William Augustine Washington

(1757-1777) Army leader during the American Revolution

"Site of Fort Watson."—Lossing, 1851

<p>The Siege of Fort Watson was an American Revolutionary War confrontation in South Carolina that began on April 15, 1781 and lasted until April 23, 1781. Continental Army forces under Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee and South Carolina militia under Francis Marion besieged Fort Watson, a fortified British outpost that formed part of the communication and supply chain between Charleston and other British outposts further inland.

<p>The attackers, lacking artillery, were unable to make a dent in the fortified works, and failed in attempts to deny the garrison of a water supply. They then devised a plan to build a tower from which sharpshooters could fire into the fort's walls. Fort Watson was once again attacked by the Americans on April 23, with the British forces unable to control the walls due to musket fire from the tower. They surrendered shortly afterwards.

Fort Watson

"Site of Fort Watson."—Lossing, 1851 The Siege of Fort Watson was an American Revolutionary War confrontation…

A battle of the American Revolution in 1780. Led by Abraham Buford, the men of the Continental Army in this battle were almost all slain and severely injured.

Battle of Waxhaws

A battle of the American Revolution in 1780. Led by Abraham Buford, the men of the Continental Army…

"Gold medal awarded by Congress to General Wayne. This is a representation of the medal, the size of the original. On this side is a fort on the top of a hill; the British flag flying; troops in single file advancing up the hill, and a large number lying at the bottom. Artillery are seen in the foreground, and six vessels in the river. The inscription is, 'Stony Point expugnatum, XV. Jul. MDCCLXXIX.;' 'Stony Point captured, July 15, 1779.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Wayne Medal Back

"Gold medal awarded by Congress to General Wayne. This is a representation of the medal, the size of…

"Gold medal awarded by Congress to General Wayne. This is a representation of the medal, the size of the original. On this side is a device repesenting an Indian queen crowned, a quiver on her back, and wearing a short apron of feathers. A mantle hangs from her waist behind, the upper end of which appears as if passed through the girdle of her apron, and hangs gracefully by her side. With her right hand she is presenting a wreath to General Wayne; in her left she is holding up a mural crown toward his head. At her feet, on the left, an alligator is lying. The American shield is resting against the animal. Over the figure is the legend 'Antonio Wayne duci exercitas,' and beneath, 'Comitia Americana,' 'The American Congress to General Anthony Wayne.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Wayne Medal Front

"Gold medal awarded by Congress to General Wayne. This is a representation of the medal, the size of…

General Anthony Wayne's monument at St. David's Episcopal Church, Radnor, Pennsylvania.

Wayne's Monument

General Anthony Wayne's monument at St. David's Episcopal Church, Radnor, Pennsylvania.

(1745-1796) American soldier that was a Revolutionary war hero.

General Anthony Wayne

(1745-1796) American soldier that was a Revolutionary war hero.

General Wayne fought in the American Revolution.

General Anthony Wayne

General Wayne fought in the American Revolution.

"General Anthony Wayne was a Revolutionary leader."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Anthony Wayne

"General Anthony Wayne was a Revolutionary leader."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

The Webb House. This house is still standing (1848), in the central part of Wethersfield, a few rods south of the Congregational Church.

Webb House

The Webb House. This house is still standing (1848), in the central part of Wethersfield, a few rods…

"John Wesley, an American Methodist."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

John Wesley

"John Wesley, an American Methodist."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"West Point in 1780. This view is from a print published in the <em>New York Magazine</em> for 1790. It was taken from Constitution Island. On the left is seen a portion of old Fort Constitution. The great chain, four hundred and fifty yards in length, and covered by a strong battery, is seen stretched across the river, immediately below Fort Clinton, the structure on the high point. In the distance, on the left, two mountain summits are seen, crowned with fortifications. These were the North and Middle Redoubts. Upon the range of the Sugar Loaf Mountain, higher than these, and hidden, in the view, by Fort Clinton, was another redoubt, called the South Battery."—Lossing, 1851

West Point

"West Point in 1780. This view is from a print published in the New York Magazine for 1790.…

A famous painter of historical scenes around and after the time of the American Revolution.

Benjamin West

A famous painter of historical scenes around and after the time of the American Revolution.

Western line of barracks. There were four large buildings used for barracks within the fort, the walls or chimneys of which were built of limestone. One of them has been entirely removed, and another, two hundred and eighty-seven feet long, is almost demolished. Portions of it are seen on the left, in the foreground of the picture. The walls of the other two-one, one hundred and ninety-two, and the other two hundred and sixteen feet long, and two stories high- are quite perfect, and one of them was roofed and inhabited until within two or three years.  At each end, and between these barracks, are seen the remains of the western range of barracks, and looking southeast. The hills in the distance are the Green Mountains on the left, and the nearer range called Snake mountain, on the right.

Western Line of Barracks

Western line of barracks. There were four large buildings used for barracks within the fort, the walls…

"South of the fort a short distance was a brick house with 'I.A.W. 1748' on one of the gables, the initials standing for James and Anna Whitall. The house had been built twenty-nine years. Mr. Whitall lived there with his wife and family. He was a Quaker, and a good Whig. Seeing that the battle was about to begin, he and his wife left the house; but his mother, an old lady, would not leave."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Whitall's House at Red Bank

"South of the fort a short distance was a brick house with 'I.A.W. 1748' on one of the gables, the initials…

"Washington's head-quarters near Whitemarsh."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Whitemarsh head-quarters

"Washington's head-quarters near Whitemarsh."—Lossing, 1851

Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin.

Eli Whitney

Eli Whitney, inventor of the cotton gin.

William's Rock. This view is taken from the road, looking northward. In the distance is seen the highest point of the French Mountain, on the left of which is Lake George. From this commanding height the French scouts had a fine view of all the English movements at the head of the lake.

William's Rock

William's Rock. This view is taken from the road, looking northward. In the distance is seen the highest…

"Landing-place of Roger Williams. This view is on the left bank of the Seekonk, looking south. The point on which the figure stands is the famous rock, composed of a mass of dark slate, and rising but little above the water at high tide. The high banks are seen beyond, and on the extreme left is India Point, with the rail-road bridge near the entrance of the river into Narraganset Bay."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Williams landing-place

"Landing-place of Roger Williams. This view is on the left bank of the Seekonk, looking south. The point…

Wind-mill Point. This view was sketched from the steam-boat, when a little below the wind-mill, looking west-north-west. The mill is a strong stone structure, and answered a very good purpose for a fort or block-house. Its narrow windows were used by the patriots as loop-holes for their muskets during the action.

Wind-Mill Point

Wind-mill Point. This view was sketched from the steam-boat, when a little below the wind-mill, looking…

Site of Wintermoot's Fort. This view is from the ancient bed of the Susquehanna, looking west. The building, formerly the property of Colonel Jenkins, and now owned by Mr. David Goodwin, is upon the site of old Fort Wintermoot, which was destroyed at the time of the invasion in 1778. It is upon the ancient bank of the river, here from fifteen to twenty feeth high, and about sixty rods from the stream in its present channel.

Wintermoot's Fort

Site of Wintermoot's Fort. This view is from the ancient bed of the Susquehanna, looking west. The building,…

Wolfe's Monument. Since 1848, the remains of this monument have been removed, and a column forty feet high, surmounted by a bronze helmet and sword, has been erected. The monument is from the design of Sir James Alexander.

Wolfe's Monument

Wolfe's Monument. Since 1848, the remains of this monument have been removed, and a column forty feet…

Wolfe's Ravine. This scene is about half way up the ravine from Wolfe's Cove, looking down the road, which is a steep and winding way from the river to the summit of the Plains of Abraham. It is a cool, shaded nook- a delightful retreat from the din and dust of the city in summer.

Wolfe's Ravine

Wolfe's Ravine. This scene is about half way up the ravine from Wolfe's Cove, looking down the road,…

"Woodhull's Grave. Nathaniel Woodhull was born at Mastic, Long Island, December 30, 1722. Agriculture was the chief pursuit of his life. He was a major, under Abercrombie, in the attack upon Crown Point and Ticonderoga, and afterward accompanied Bradstreet against Fort Frontenac. He was a colonel, under Amherst, in 1760, and at the close of the campaign he returned home and married Ruth Floyd. He espoused the popular side in the Stamp Act movements, and, possessing the esteem of the people, he was elected, with William Nicoll, a representative of Suffolk county, in the Colonial Assembly in 1769. He represented Suffolk in the first Provincial Congress in 1775, and was elected president of that body. He was appointed a brigadier of militia in August of that year, and in July, 1776, he was summoned home to embody the militia of Suffolk and Queens, to assist in repelling invasion. He was engaged in this service when he ws made a prisoner, cruelly wounded by a British officer, and died of his injuries three weeks afterward, at New Utrecht. His wife, who was with him in his last moments, conveyed his body to Mastic, and there, in a secluded family cemetary, a short distance from his residence, his remains rest. A marble slab marks his grave, and bears the following inscription: 'In memory of General Nathaniel Woodhull, who, wounded and a prisoner, died on the twentieth of September, 1776, in the fifty-fourth year of his age; regretted by all who knew how to value his many private virtues, and that pure zeal for the rights of his country to which he perished a victim.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Woodhull's Grave

"Woodhull's Grave. Nathaniel Woodhull was born at Mastic, Long Island, December 30, 1722. Agriculture…

"Woodhull's Monument. This monument stands on the south side of the church. It is of white marble, about eight feet in height. The following is the inscription upon it: 'Sacred to the memory of the Reverend John Woodhull, D.D., who died Nov. 22d, 1824, aged 80 years. An able, faithful, and beloved minister of Jesus Christ. He preached the Gospel 56 years. He was settled first in Leacock, in Pennsylvania, and in 1779 removed to this congregation, which he served as pastor, with great diligence and success, for 45 years. Eminent as an instructor of youth, zealous for the glory of God, fervent and active in the discharge of all public and private duties, the labors of a long life have ended ina large reward.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Woodhull's Monument

"Woodhull's Monument. This monument stands on the south side of the church. It is of white marble, about…

Place where Wooster fell.

Wooster Fell

Place where Wooster fell.

A phrase that refers to the first shot fired against the British in the American Revolution, during the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

The Shot that is Heard Around the World

A phrase that refers to the first shot fired against the British in the American Revolution, during…

"Bridge at Worth's Mill's. This substantial stone bridge, over Stony Brook, is upon the site of the wooden one destroyed on the 3d of January, 1777. The old mill on the left is now owned by Josiah S. Worth, a son of the propietor during the Revolution. This sketch was made from the road on the bank of the stream, along which Mercer and his detachment marched to secure the bridge."—Lossing, 1851

Worth's Mills

"Bridge at Worth's Mill's. This substantial stone bridge, over Stony Brook, is upon the site of the…

The Yeoman House. This view is from the road, looking north. An attempt was made by a soldier to burn the house, but so rapid was the march of the invaders that the flames had made but little progress before the troops were far on their road to the village. An [African American] woman, who was concealed under some corn-stalks near, extinguished the flames. The house is about half a mile from the river, on the right side of the road from the landing to Kingston village.

Yeoman House

The Yeoman House. This view is from the road, looking north. An attempt was made by a soldier to burn…

Francois Yest was a Frenchman, involved in the American Revolution.

Francois Yest

Francois Yest was a Frenchman, involved in the American Revolution.