"Friends' meeting-house. This view is from the shed in the yard, looking southeast. The building stands in the center of a large square, if of imported brick, and very spacious. The Quakers were numerous in this vicinity in the time of the Revolution, and a large number of the present inhabitants are members of that sect."—Lossing, 1851

Friends' meeting-house

"Friends' meeting-house. This view is from the shed in the yard, looking southeast. The building stands…

Robert Fulton, born 1765; died 1815

Robert Fulton

Robert Fulton, born 1765; died 1815

"Gaspee Point. This view is from the bank of the cove just below the Point, looking northeast, showing its appearance at low water when the clam-fishers are upon it. The buoy is seen beyond the extreme end of the Point on the right. The bank is about fifteen feet high. In front of Pawtuxet, about a mile above, are the remains of breast-works, thrown up during the war of 1812. There are also breast-works at Field's Point, two miles below Providence, where is a flag-staff. There is the quarantine ground."—Lossing, 1851

Gaspee Point

"Gaspee Point. This view is from the bank of the cove just below the Point, looking northeast, showing…

General Gate's headquarters at Saratoga.

Gate's Headquarters

General Gate's headquarters at Saratoga.

Medal struck in honor of General Gates and his army. On the reverse side, Burgoyne is represented in the attitude of delivering up his sword; and in the background, on either side of them, are seen the two armies of England and America, the former laying down their arms. At the top is the latin enscription, <em>Salus Regionum Septentrional</em>; literal English, <em>Safety of the northern region or department</em>. Below is the inscription, <em>Hoste ad Saratogum in Dedition, Accepto Die XVII. Oct., MDCCLXXVII</em>; English, <em>Enemy at Saratoga surrendered October 17th, 1777.</em>

Gates Medal

Medal struck in honor of General Gates and his army. On the reverse side, Burgoyne is represented in…

Medal struck in honor of General Gates and his army. On this side is a bust of General Gates, with the Latin inscription, <em>Horatio Gates Duci Strenuo Comitia Amercana</em>; literal English, <em>Horatio Gates, brave leader of the American forces.</em>

Gates Medal

Medal struck in honor of General Gates and his army. On this side is a bust of General Gates, with the…

"General Horatio Gates, American general in the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Horatio Gates

"General Horatio Gates, American general in the American Revolution."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Gates fought in the American Revolution and was appointed to the command of the northern American army.

General Gates

General Gates fought in the American Revolution and was appointed to the command of the northern American…

General Greene fought in the American Revolution.

General Greene

General Greene fought in the American Revolution.

"Fort George, from the water front of the present Castle Garden."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort George

"Fort George, from the water front of the present Castle Garden."—Lossing, 1851

Lord George Germain, former Secretary of War.

Lord George Germain

Lord George Germain, former Secretary of War.

Balm of Gilead at Fort Edward.

Balm of Gilead

Balm of Gilead at Fort Edward.

A brigadier general in the Continental Army. He was from Marblehead, Massachusetts and was the first of many privateers to join the war.

Colonel Glover

A brigadier general in the Continental Army. He was from Marblehead, Massachusetts and was the first…

"It is a weary march. The soldiers are foot-sore, hungry, exhausted. Some drop from the ranks, and fall asleep in a moment upon the frozen ground. Mile after mile they drag themselves along. Little children give them bread, glad to do so much for those who have fought so bravely, and receive in return a kind 'God bless you!'"&mdash;Coffin, 1879

God Bless You

"It is a weary march. The soldiers are foot-sore, hungry, exhausted. Some drop from the ranks, and fall…

"Monument at Goshen. During the battle, Major Wood, of Goshen, made a masonic sign, by accident, which Brant, who was a Free-mason, perceived and heeded. Wood's life was spared, and as a prisoner he was treated kindly, until the Mohawk chief perceived that he was not a Mason. Then, with withering scorn, Brant looked upon Wood, believing that he had obtained the masonic sign which he used, by deception. It was purely an accident on the part of Wood. When released, he hastened to become a member of the fraternity by whose instrumentality his life had been spared. The house in which Major Wood lived is yet standing (though much altered), at the foot of the hill north of the rail-way station at Goshen. The house of Roger Townsend, who was among the slain, is also standing, and well preserved. It is in the southern part of the village."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Goshen Monument

"Monument at Goshen. During the battle, Major Wood, of Goshen, made a masonic sign, by accident, which…

"View at Fort Granby."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Granby

"View at Fort Granby."—Lossing, 1851

(1723-1788) French military leader that assisted with the Revolutionary war

Count De Grasse

(1723-1788) French military leader that assisted with the Revolutionary war

"View at Gravesend Bay. This view is from the road on the high shore, a little below Fort Hamilton, looking southeast; the house in the center belonged to Simon Cortelyou, a Tory, during the Revolution, and has not been altered. Gravesend Bay is seen beyond the house, and the distant land is Coney Island beach."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Gravesend Bay

"View at Gravesend Bay. This view is from the road on the high shore, a little below Fort Hamilton,…

"Great Bridge at McConkey's Ferry."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Great Bridge

"Great Bridge at McConkey's Ferry."—Lossing, 1851

"View at the Great Bridge, during the American Revolution."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Great Bridge

"View at the Great Bridge, during the American Revolution."—Lossing, 1851

"Head-quarters of Greene and Knox. This view is from the turnpike road, looking southeast. The water in front is a mill-pond over the dam of which passes a foot-bridge. The mill is hidden by the trees in the ravine below. This side was originally the rear of the house, the old Goshen road passing upon the other side. The old front is a story and a half high. Captain Morton, the proprietor, is a son of the late General Jacob Morton, of New York city."—Lossing, 1851

Greene and Knox Head-Quarters

"Head-quarters of Greene and Knox. This view is from the turnpike road, looking southeast. The water…

"Greene and Pulaski monument."—Lossing, 1851

Greene and Pulaski Monument

"Greene and Pulaski monument."—Lossing, 1851

"Gold medal awarded to Greene. This is a representation of the back side of the medal, the full size of the original. On this side is a figure of Victory, lighting upon the Earth, and stepping upon a broken shield. Under her feet are broken weapons, colors, and a shield. The legend is, Salus Regionum Australium; 'The Safety of the Southern Department.' Exergue- Hostibus Ad Eutaw Debellatis VIII Sept. MDCCLXXXI; 'The Foe conquered at Eutaw, 8th of September, 1781.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Greene Medal Back

"Gold medal awarded to Greene. This is a representation of the back side of the medal, the full size…

"Gold medal awarded to Greene. This is a representation of the front side of the medal, the full size of the original. On this side is a profile of Greene, with the words, Nathanieli Greene Egregio Duci Comitia Americana; 'The American Congress to Nathaniel Greene, the distinguished leader.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Greene Medal Front

"Gold medal awarded to Greene. This is a representation of the front side of the medal, the full size…

"General Nathaniel Greene, famous American general from the Southern Campaign during the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Nathaniel Greene

"General Nathaniel Greene, famous American general from the Southern Campaign during the American Revolution."—E.…

George Grenville, English government official.

George Grenville

George Grenville, English government official.

Grey nun praying during the American Revolution.

Grey Nun

Grey nun praying during the American Revolution.

"Monument at Groton. This is a view from the southwest angle of old Fort Griswold, looking northeast. The embankments of the fort are seen in the foreground; near the figure is the well, the same mentioned by Mr. Hempstead in his narrative; and just beyond this is the old entrance, or sally-port, through which the enemy, under Broomfield, entered the fort."—Lossing, 1851

<p>It is dedicated to the defenders who fell during the Battle of Groton Heights on September 6, 1781. Built between 1826 and 1830, the Monument stands 135 feet tall with 166 steps. A plaque affixed to the monument above the entrance reads
"THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, A.D. 1830, AND IN THE 55TH YEAR OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE U.S.A. IN MEMORY OF THE BRAVE PATRIOTS, WHO FELL IN THE MASSACRE AT FORT GRISWOLD, NEAR THIS SPOT, ON THE 6TH OF SEPT. A.D. 1781, WHEN THE BRITISH, UNDER THE COMMAND OF THE TRAITOR, BENEDICT ARNOLD, BURNT THE TOWNS OF NEW LONDON AND GROTON, AND SPREAD DESOLATION AND WOE THROUGHOUT THIS REGION."

Groton Monument

"Monument at Groton. This is a view from the southwest angle of old Fort Griswold, looking northeast.…

Grummon's Hill.

Grummon's Hill

Grummon's Hill.

"View of the battle-ground. This view is from the eminence southwest of the site of old Guilford Court House, near the junction of the roads running one north to Bruce's Cross-roads, the other west to Salem. The log-house, partially clapboarded, seen on the right, was uninhabited. It stands near the woods which intervene between Martinsville and the plantation of Mr. Hotchkiss. In the distance, near the center, is seen Martinsville, and between it and the foreground is the rolling vale, its undulations furrowed by many gulleys. In an open field, on the left of the road, seen in the hollow toward the left of the picture, was the fiercest part of the battle, where Washington charged upon the guards. Upon the ridge extending to the right through the center of the picture, the second line (Virginians) was posted. The fence running to the right from Martinsville, down into the valley on the right, denotes the Salisbury road. The snow was falling very fast when I made this sketch, and distant objects were seen with great difficulty. Our point of view, at the old loghouse, is the extreme westerly boundary of the field of controversy."—Lossing, 1851

Guilford Battle-ground

"View of the battle-ground. This view is from the eminence southwest of the site of old Guilford Court…

The site of the Guilford Courthouse battle, a pivotal battle of the American Revolution. This battle impelled the British general to take the road that would soon lead him to defeat.

Guilford Courthouse

The site of the Guilford Courthouse battle, a pivotal battle of the American Revolution. This battle…

"View at Gum Swamp. This view is from the south side of the stream."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Gum Swamp

"View at Gum Swamp. This view is from the south side of the stream."—Lossing, 1851

This was the residence of Colonel Guy Johnson, and is still standing, on the north side of the Mohawk, about a mile from the village of Amsterdam, in Montgomery county. It is substantially built of stone, and may stand a century yet. Embowered in trees, it is a beautiful summer residence.

Guy Park

This was the residence of Colonel Guy Johnson, and is still standing, on the north side of the Mohawk,…

(1751-1815) He served in the Revolution as lieutenant Colonel in the Georgia Continental Lines

Joseph Habersham

(1751-1815) He served in the Revolution as lieutenant Colonel in the Georgia Continental Lines

"Statue of Nathan Hale. It was during his treated that an event occurred which showed how much Americans were willing to venture and how bravely they could die for the cause in which they were engaged. A young Connecticut soldier, a Yale student, Captain Nathan Hale, had volunteered to go within the British lines on Long Island that he might learn the position of the enemy. On the way back he was arrested. No trial was allowed him. He was not shot as a soldier, but was hanged. 'I only regret,' he said, as he was about to die, 'that I have but one life to give for my country.'"—Scudder, 1897

Hale Statue

"Statue of Nathan Hale. It was during his treated that an event occurred which showed how much Americans…

"Hancock's House, Boston. This is a substantial stone building, situated upon Beacon Street, fronting the Common. It was erected by Thomas Hancock, an uncle of Governor Hancock, in 1737. The present proprietor is a nephew of the governor."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hancock's House

"Hancock's House, Boston. This is a substantial stone building, situated upon Beacon Street, fronting…

John Hancock (January 23 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] - October 8, 1793) was a Massachusetts merchant and prominent patriot of the American Revolution, but is most famous for his prominent signature on the United States Declaration of Independence.

John Hancock

John Hancock (January 23 1737 [O.S. January 12, 1736] - October 8, 1793) was a Massachusetts merchant…

Hanover County Courthouse is the place where Patrick Henry practiced law and argued the case accusing King George III of tyranny in overturning colonial law without regard to the wishes of his subjects.

Hanover Courthouse

Hanover County Courthouse is the place where Patrick Henry practiced law and argued the case accusing…

"Harlem Plains, from a roof on Mount Morris."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Harlem Plains

"Harlem Plains, from a roof on Mount Morris."—Lossing, 1851

"Head-dress for the Mischianza."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Head-Dress

"Head-dress for the Mischianza."—Lossing, 1851

A short story written by Washington Irving. The tale describes a superstitious man named Ichabod Crane, who is chased by the Headless Horseman, a ghost of the American Revolution.

The Headless Horseman, Sleepy Hollow

A short story written by Washington Irving. The tale describes a superstitious man named Ichabod Crane,…

Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 - June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered for his "Give me Liberty, or give me Death!" speech.

Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 - June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known…

An illustration of Patrick Henry a man who served as the post-colonial Governor of Virginia and was also a prominent figure in the American Revolution. He is known as one of the founding fathers of the United States.

Patrick Henry

An illustration of Patrick Henry a man who served as the post-colonial Governor of Virginia and was…

A drawing of the courtroom scene when Patrick Henry said his famous speech, "Give me liberty or give me death."

"Give me liberty or give me death!"

A drawing of the courtroom scene when Patrick Henry said his famous speech, "Give me liberty or give…

Statue of Patrick Henry, American Revolutionary, in Richmond, Virginia.

Statue of Patrick Henry at Richmond, VA

Statue of Patrick Henry, American Revolutionary, in Richmond, Virginia.

General Herkimer's grave.

Herkimer's Grave

General Herkimer's grave.

General Herkimer's Residence.

Herkimer's residence

General Herkimer's Residence.

"View of the front of the Hessian Flag"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hessian Flag

"View of the front of the Hessian Flag"—Lossing, 1851

"View of the back of the Hessian Flag"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hessian Flag

"View of the back of the Hessian Flag"—Lossing, 1851

"View at the Spring; Hobkirk's Hill. It is at the hed of a ravine, scooped out of the northeastern slope of Hobkirk's Hill. The noble trees which shadow it are tulips, poplars, and pines. The house seen on the top of the hill, toward the left, is the residence of William E. Johnson, Esq., president of the Camden Bank. A few yards below the spring a dike has been cast up, across the ravine, by which a fine duck pond is formed, and adds beauty to the scene, in summer."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hobkirk's Hill

"View at the Spring; Hobkirk's Hill. It is at the hed of a ravine, scooped out of the northeastern slope…

"Hopkins' Monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hopkins Monument

"Hopkins' Monument."—Lossing, 1851

"The Hopper House. This view is from the road, looking northeast. The low part, on the left, is a portion of the old mansion of the Revolution, which contained the dining-hall. It was a long stone building. A part of it has been taken down, and the present more spacious edifice, of brick, was erected soon after the war."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hopper House

"The Hopper House. This view is from the road, looking northeast. The low part, on the left, is a portion…

"Silver medal awarded to Colonel Howard. The following are the device and inscriptions upon the back: A laurel wreath inclosing the inscription, Quod In Nutantem Hostium Aciem Subito Irruens, Pr&aelig;clarum Bellic&aelig; Virtutis Speciment Dedit In Pugna, Ad Cowpens, 17 January, 1781- 'Because, rushing suddenly on the wavering line of the foe, he gave a brilliant specimen of martial courage at the battle of the Cowpens, January 17, 1781.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Howard Medal Back

"Silver medal awarded to Colonel Howard. The following are the device and inscriptions upon the back:…

"Silver medal awarded to Colonel Howard. The following are the device and inscriptions upon the front: An officer mounted, with uplifted sword, pursuing an officer on foot bearing a stand of colors. Victory is seen descending in front, over the former, holding a wreath in her right hand over his head. In her left hand is a palm branch. Legend: John Eager Howard, Legionis Peditum Pr&aelig;fecto Comitia Americana- 'The American Congress to John Eager Howard, commander of a regiment of infantry.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Howard Medal Front

"Silver medal awarded to Colonel Howard. The following are the device and inscriptions upon the front:…

"Howe's head-quarters."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Howe's Head-Quarters

"Howe's head-quarters."—Lossing, 1851

"When Howe reached that place he found General Sullivan confronting him, and the fishermen of Marblehead, under Colonel Glover; but the British greatly outnumbered the Americans, and Howe was able to push inland to the hills south of New Rochelle. The country was thickly covered with woods; but Howe found a small house in which he established his head-quarters."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Howe's Headquarters

"When Howe reached that place he found General Sullivan confronting him, and the fishermen of Marblehead,…

"General Howe's quarters were in a house on High Street, one door east from the southeast corner of Sixth Street, where President Washington resided. Three houses, Nos. 192-194 High Street, now occupy the site of this mansion."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Howe's Quarters

"General Howe's quarters were in a house on High Street, one door east from the southeast corner of…

"General Howe's quarters."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Howe's Quarters

"General Howe's quarters."—Lossing, 1851

"General Howe, commander of the British troops, left Massachusetts on March 17, 1776."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Howe

"General Howe, commander of the British troops, left Massachusetts on March 17, 1776."—E. Benjamin…

(--) Appointed general for the North Carolina regiment during the Revolutionary War

Robert Howe

(--) Appointed general for the North Carolina regiment during the Revolutionary War