"Hubbard's House and Mill. The inscriptions upon the monument are as follows: East Side: "Oliver Hazard Perry. At the age of 27 years he achieved the victory of Lake Erie September 10, 1813.' North Side: 'Born in South Kingston, R. I., August 23rd, 1785. Died at Fort Spain, Trinidad, August 23d, 1819, aged 34 years.' West Side: 'His remains were conveyed to his native land in a ship of war, according to a resolution of Congress, and were here interred, December 4, 1826.' South Side: 'Erected by the State of Rhode Island.'"—Lossing, 1851

Hubbard's House and Mill

"Hubbard's House and Mill. The inscriptions upon the monument are as follows: East Side: "Oliver Hazard…

The battle-ground of Hubbardton.

Hubbardton

The battle-ground of Hubbardton.

(1753-1825) American general in the Revolutionary War

William Hull

(1753-1825) American general in the Revolutionary War

William Hull (June 24, 1753 - November 29, 1825) was an American soldier and governor of Michigan Territory.

William Hull

William Hull (June 24, 1753 - November 29, 1825) was an American soldier and governor of Michigan Territory.

Humphrey's monument.

Humphrey's Monument

Humphrey's monument.

"Governor Huntington's Mansion."—Lossing, 1851

Huntington Mansion

"Governor Huntington's Mansion."—Lossing, 1851

"Governor Huntington's Tomb."—Lossing, 1851

Huntington's Tomb

"Governor Huntington's Tomb."—Lossing, 1851

"General Huntington's Tomb."—Lossing, 1851

Huntington's Tomb

"General Huntington's Tomb."—Lossing, 1851

Independence Hall, 1776

Independence Hall

Independence Hall, 1776

Interior of Independence Hall

Independence Hall

Interior of Independence Hall

The location where both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated and adopted.

Independence Hall

The location where both the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution were debated…

Isle Aux Noix, in the Sorel. The sketch was made from the pilot's room of the steam-boat, about half a mile above the island, looking east-northeast. The landing is a little beyond the trees on the right, where sentinels are stationed. The island is small, and wholly occupied by the military works. A broad fen extends some distance from the northern side, and the wild ducks that gather there afford fine amusement for sportsment during the hunting season.

Isle Aux Noix

Isle Aux Noix, in the Sorel. The sketch was made from the pilot's room of the steam-boat, about half…

(1757-1806) Governor of Georgia who fought with the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War

James Jackson

(1757-1806) Governor of Georgia who fought with the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War

"Scene on the James River, at Richmond. This view is from a long shaded island extending up the river from Mayo's Bridge, one of the three structures which span the stream at Richmond. Down the river from our point of view is seen Mayo's Bridge, and, in the extreme distance, the lower portion of Richmond, upon Richmond or Church Hill. Several fish-traps are seen among the rapids in the river. On the left are observed two or three smaller islands. Since the boave sketch was made, a bridge, for the accommodation of the Danville rail-way, has been constructed from the Richmond end of Mayo's Bridge, diagonally, to the southern end of the Petersburgh rail-way bridge, crossing very nearly our point of view. Not content with thus marring the beauty of one of the finest series of islands and cascades in the country, the company have covered the bridge, so as to shut out from the eyes of passengers the surrounding attractions."—Lossing, 1851

James River

"Scene on the James River, at Richmond. This view is from a long shaded island extending up the river…

"Colonel Jameson's head-quarters. This is a view of the out-buildings of Mr. Sands, at North Castle, situated a few yards from his residence. The lowest building, on the left, is the dwelling, now attached to the barn of Mr. Sands, which Jameson used as his head-quarters. In that building Andre was kept guarded until sent to West Point."—Lossing, 1851

Jameson's Head-quarters

"Colonel Jameson's head-quarters. This is a view of the out-buildings of Mr. Sands, at North Castle,…

"Distant view of Jamestown Island. This view is from the north side of what was once a marsh, but now a deep bay, four hundred yards wide. On the left is seen the remains of a bridge, destroyed by a gale and high tide a few years ago; and beyond is the James River. Near the point of the island, toward the end of the bridge, are the remains of an ancient church. Mr. Coke resided upon the island when the tempest occurred which destroyed the bridge. The island was submerged, and for three days himself and family were prisoners. It was in winter, and he was obliged to cut the branches of ornamental trees that were close to his house, for fuel. I was gravely informed by a man on the beach, while making the sketch, that Pocahontas crossed at that very spot '<em>in her skiff</em>,' when she went to warn the Jamestown settlers of threatened danger. The dear child had no need of a skiff, had such a thing existed in America, for I was told by Mr. Coke that his father-in-law well remembered when a marsh, so narrow and firm that a person might cross it upon a fence rail, was where the deep water at the ruined bridge now is. Every year the current of James River is changing its margins in this region, and within a few years Jamestown Island, made so only by a marsh on the land side, will have a navigable channel around it. Already a large portion of it, whereon the ancient town was erected, has been washed away; and I was informed that a cypress-tree, now many yards from the shore stood at the end of a carriage-way to the wharf, sixty yards from the water's edge, only sixteen years ago. The destructive flood is gradually approaching the old church tower, and if the hand of man shall not arrest its sure progress, that too will be swept away, and not a vestige of Jamestown will remain. Virginians, look to it, and let a wall of masonry along the river margin attest your reverence for the most interesting historical relic within your borders! Some remains of the old fort may be seen at low water, several yards from the shore."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Jamestown Island

"Distant view of Jamestown Island. This view is from the north side of what was once a marsh, but now…

"Ruins at Jamestown. This view is from the old church-yard, looking toward James River, a glimpse of which may be seen through the arches. The stream is here about three miles wide. It is uncertain at what precise time the church, of which now only a portion of the tower remains, was erected. It ws probably built sometime between 1617 and 1620. According to Smith, a fire consumed a large portion of the town, with the palisades, at about the close of 1607, the first year of the settlement. Captain Smith and Mr. Scrivener were appointed commissioners to superintend the rebuilding of the town and church. Afterward, in speaking of the arrival of Governor Argall in 1617, he says, 'In James towne he found but five or six houses, the church downe, the pallizados broken, the bridge in pieces, the well of fresh water spoiled, the store-house used for the church.' The tower here represented was doubtless of the third church built, and is now (1852) about 234 years old. The tower is now about thirty feet high, the walls three feet thick, all of imported brick."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Jamestown Ruins

"Ruins at Jamestown. This view is from the old church-yard, looking toward James River, a glimpse of…

"Down past the mouth of York River, where the French ships were blockading Cornwallis, into James River, and up the James to Jamestown, sailed the ships from Elkton, landing on the 25th, and marching to Williamstown."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

The Landing at Jamestown

"Down past the mouth of York River, where the French ships were blockading Cornwallis, into James River,…

Jane McCrea Tree, Fort Edward.

Jane McCrea Tree

Jane McCrea Tree, Fort Edward.

"View at Jasper's Spring."—Lossing, 1851

Jasper's Spring

"View at Jasper's Spring."—Lossing, 1851

An American soldier who recovered the South Carolina flag and temporarily restored it during a battle in 1776.

Sergeant Jasper

An American soldier who recovered the South Carolina flag and temporarily restored it during a battle…

"View at Jefferis' Ford. This view is from the easterly bank of the Brandywine. The ford was at the mouth of the little creek seen issuing from the small bridge on the left. The Brandywine here is broad and shallow, with quite a rapid current."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Jefferis' Ford

"View at Jefferis' Ford. This view is from the easterly bank of the Brandywine. The ford was at the…

(--) French major general that led troops for the American Revolution

Francis John, Marquis De Chastellux

(--) French major general that led troops for the American Revolution

North point of Johnson Hall.

Johnson Hall

North point of Johnson Hall.

"John Paul Jones' medal, front side."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Jones' Medal

"John Paul Jones' medal, front side."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"John Paul Jones' medal, back side."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Jones' Medal

"John Paul Jones' medal, back side."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"John Paul Jones, key figure in the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

John Paul Jones

"John Paul Jones, key figure in the American Revolution."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

The Jumel Mansion in New York City is a historic location which served as the headquarters for both sides of the American Revolution.

Jumel Mansion

The Jumel Mansion in New York City is a historic location which served as the headquarters for both…

"View at King's Bridge. This view is from the southwest side of the stream, from near the tide-mill. The house beyond, shaded by willows, is the residence of the widow of the late Robert McComb."—Lossing, 1851

King's Bridge

"View at King's Bridge. This view is from the southwest side of the stream, from near the tide-mill.…

An old sign for King's Ferry on the Hudson River.

King's Ferry - Old Sign

An old sign for King's Ferry on the Hudson River.

"View at King's Mountain battle-ground. This view is from the foot of the hill, whereon the hottest of the fight occurred. The north slope of that eminence is seen on the left. In the center, within a sort of basin, into which several ravines converge, is seen the simple monument erected to the memory of Ferguson and others; and in the foreground, on the right, is seen the great tulip-tree, upon which, tradition says, ten Tories were hung."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

King's Mountain Battle-Ground

"View at King's Mountain battle-ground. This view is from the foot of the hill, whereon the hottest…

"Mr. Jacobus Kip lived in an old-fashioned Dutch house, built of bricks make in Holland and brought to America, because the old Dutch burghers thought that there was no clay in American suitable to be made into bricks. The house stood a short distance from the water, and had curiously shaped windows in the roof, and a weather-cock above the ridge-pole."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Jacobus Kip's House

"Mr. Jacobus Kip lived in an old-fashioned Dutch house, built of bricks make in Holland and brought…

(1759--) Soldier for the Revolutionary War. He was afterwards chosen a member of the Commander-in-chiefs Guard

Usual Knapp

(1759--) Soldier for the Revolutionary War. He was afterwards chosen a member of the Commander-in-chiefs…

"La Fayette's tomb."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

La Fayette's Tomb

"La Fayette's tomb."—Lossing, 1851

The Marquis de Lafayette, a French citizen who fought on the side of the Americans during the American Revolution.

Marquis de Lafayette

The Marquis de Lafayette, a French citizen who fought on the side of the Americans during the American…

A French military officer who led the Garde Nationale during the French Revolution, as well as fought in the American Revolutionary War as a general.

Lafayette

A French military officer who led the Garde Nationale during the French Revolution, as well as fought…

This is the place near Chadd's Ford where Lafayette took post and occupied his headquarters.

Lafayette's Headquarters Near Chadd's Ford

This is the place near Chadd's Ford where Lafayette took post and occupied his headquarters.

(1757-1834) French statesman, soldier and general who helped with the American revolutionary forces.

Marquis de Lafayette

(1757-1834) French statesman, soldier and general who helped with the American revolutionary forces.

A French military officer who served as a general in the American Revolutionary War, as well as the French Revolution.

Marquis of Lafayette

A French military officer who served as a general in the American Revolutionary War, as well as the…

"Marquis de Lafayette, Frenchman who fought during the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Marquis de Lafeyette

"Marquis de Lafayette, Frenchman who fought during the American Revolution."—E. Benjamin Andrews,…

Head of Lake George

Lake George

Head of Lake George

"Medal awarded to Lee. On the twenty second of September, Congress honored Lee with a vote of thanks, and ordered a gold medal to be struck and presented to him. On the back side, Non Obstantib. Flumin. Ibus Vallis. Astutia Virtute Bellica Parva Manu Hostes Vicit Victosq. Armis Humanitate Devnxit In Mem Pugn. Ad Paulus Hook Die XIX Aug., 1779- 'Notwithstanding rivers and intrenchments, he with a small band conquered the foe by warlike skill and prowess, and firmly bound by his humanity those who had been conquered by his arms. In memory of the conflict at Paulus's Hook, nineteenth of August, 1779.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lee Medal Back

"Medal awarded to Lee. On the twenty second of September, Congress honored Lee with a vote of thanks,…

"Medal awarded to Lee. On the twenty second of September, Congress honored Lee with a vote of thanks, and ordered a gold medal to be struck and presented to him. On the front side is a bust of the hero, with the words Henrico Lee, Legionis Equit. Pr&aelig;fecto. Comitia Americana- 'The American Congress to Henry Lee, colonel of cavalry.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lee Medal Front

"Medal awarded to Lee. On the twenty second of September, Congress honored Lee with a vote of thanks,…

The home of General Charles Lee of the American Revolution.

Charles Lee's House

The home of General Charles Lee of the American Revolution.

General Lee, the American general suspended from his command.

General Lee

General Lee, the American general suspended from his command.

"General Charles Lee, an American general in the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Charles Lee

"General Charles Lee, an American general in the American Revolution."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

(1756-1818) Soldier and public official who wrote the eulogy of George Washington.

Henry Lee

(1756-1818) Soldier and public official who wrote the eulogy of George Washington.

(1756-1818) Revolutionary War soldier.

Major Henry Lee

(1756-1818) Revolutionary War soldier.

"Monument at Lexington. This view is from the Concord Road, looking eastward, and shows a portion of the inclosure of the Green. The distant building seen on the right is the old 'Buckman Tavern,' delineated in Doolittle's engraving. It now belongs to Mrs. Merriam, and exhibits many scars made by the bullets on the morning of the skirmish."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lexington Monument

"Monument at Lexington. This view is from the Concord Road, looking eastward, and shows a portion of…

"Monument at Lexington, up close view."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lexington Monument

"Monument at Lexington, up close view."—Lossing, 1851

"Skirmish at Lexington. The largest building in the picture is the meeting-house, and the officer on horseback in front of it is Major Pitcairn. The figures in the foreground are the provincial militia. The dwelling with the two chimneys on the left (which is still standing), was Buckman's Tavern. The position of the monument since erected upon Lexington Green, is about where the provincials on the left are seen dispersing. The merit of this picture consists in its truthfulness in depicting the appearance of the spot at the time of the engagement."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Skirmish at Lexington

"Skirmish at Lexington. The largest building in the picture is the meeting-house, and the officer on…

"Liberty Bell."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Liberty Bell

"Liberty Bell."—Lossing, 1851

Liberty Bell, from Independence Hall.

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell, from Independence Hall.

The Liberty Bell was used to ring in the independence of the United States of America.

Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell was used to ring in the independence of the United States of America.

Liberty Hall. Some time after the death of Governor Livingston this property was purchased by Lord Blingbroke, who, under the assumed name of John Belesis, ran away from England with a daughter of Baron Hompasch, a German general. She was at a boarding school there, and Bolingbroke had a wife living. He married the girl here. She died in England in 1848. The grandmother of the present proprietor, Susan, the daughter of Peter Van Burgh Livingston, bought the farm of Lord Bolingbroke, and it has been in possession of the family ever since. Her first husband was John Kean, a member of Congress from South Carolina from 1785 to 1787, and was first cashier of the first United States Bank, chartered by an act of Congress passed February 8th, 1791. Her second husband was Count Niemcewicz, a Polish nobleman.

Liberty Hall

Liberty Hall. Some time after the death of Governor Livingston this property was purchased by Lord Blingbroke,…

"Liberty Tree. I am indebted to the Hon. David Sears, of Boston, for this sketch of the 'Liberty Tree,' as it appeared just previous to its destruction by the British troops and Tories, during the siege of Boston in August, 1775. Mr. Sears has erected a row of fine buildings upon the site of the old grove of elms, of which this tree was one; and within a niche, on the front of one of them, and exactly over the spot where the <em>Liberty Tree</em> stood, he has placed a sculptured representation of it, as seen in the picture. From the time of the Stamp Act excitement until the armed possession of Boston by General Gage and his troops in 1774, that tree had been the rallying-place for the patriots, and had fallen, in consequence, much in disfavor with the friends of government. It was inscribed 'Liberty Tree,' and the ground under it was called 'Liberty Hall.' The Essex Gazette of August 31st, 1775, in describing the destruction of the tree, says, 'They made a furious attack upon it. After a long spell of laughing and grinning, sweating, swearing, and foaming with malice diabolical, they cut down the tree because it bore the name of liberty. A soldier was killed by falling from one of its branches during the operation.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Liberty Tree

"Liberty Tree. I am indebted to the Hon. David Sears, of Boston, for this sketch of the 'Liberty Tree,'…

"Lillington Hall."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lillington Hall

"Lillington Hall."—Lossing, 1851

"General Lincoln, American general from the Southern Campaign during the American Revolution."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

General Lincoln

"General Lincoln, American general from the Southern Campaign during the American Revolution."—E.…

View at Little Falls. This view was taken from the rail-road near the village, looking down the river. On the right is seen the Erie Canal, and on the left, and more in the foreground, the Mohawk, at the foot of the falls, with the rail-road and the magnetic highway. The rugged bluff in the center is Moss Rock, at the lower extremity of which is the gulf, seen in the annexed engraving. This view is from the tow-path, below Moss Rock. On the left is the canal, and on the right are the gulf and a portion of the village in the distance. Moss Rock is an island, formed by the canal and the river. The summit of this amorphous pile has been suggested as an appropriate site for the proposed monument to the memory of Dewitt Clinton. It seems to me that the spot is singularly appropriate for that purpose. The Erie Canal, with its busy commerce, is his perpetual memorial; and here is the point where the most wonderful triumphs were achieved in the construction of that stupendous work. Here, too, pass all travelers to and from Niagara and the great West from the eastward, and the monument would be seen, if erected there, by more persons than at any other locality that may be named, out of the city of New York.

Little Falls

View at Little Falls. This view was taken from the rail-road near the village, looking down the river.…

The Livingston Mansion. Colonel Livingston died June 9th, 1849. Although living in the retirement of a gentleman of wealth and leisure, he often consented to serve the public in offices requiring judgment, industry, and integrity. He was a member of the state Senate on term; and it is a remarkable fact that he was never absent a day from his post inthe Senate Chamber or in the hall of the Court of Errors. He will long be remembered in Poughkeepsie as one of its best citizens.

Livingston Mansion

The Livingston Mansion. Colonel Livingston died June 9th, 1849. Although living in the retirement of…