The finial is an architectural device, typically carved in stone and employed to decoratively emphasize the apex of a gable, or any of various distinctive ornaments at the top, end, or corner of a building or structure. Smaller finials can be used as a decorative ornament on the ends of curtain rods or applied to chairs and furniture. These are frequently seen on top of bed posts or clocks. Decorative finials are also commonly used to fasten lampshades, and as an ornamental element at the end of the handles of souvenir spoons. Finials can also be decorative members at the ends of curtain rods. An architectural finial can also function as a lightning rod, and was once believed to act as a deterrent to witches on broomsticks attempting to land on one's roof.

Leaf Finial

The finial is an architectural device, typically carved in stone and employed to decoratively emphasize…

The modern knob finial is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

Modern Knob Finial

The modern knob finial is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

This modern knob finial is a fir-cone that is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

Modern Knob Finial

This modern knob finial is a fir-cone that is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

This finial modern vase is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

Finial Modern Vase

This finial modern vase is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

The stone knob finial is an Italian Gothic design found in a Milan Cathedral. It is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

Stone Knob Finial

The stone knob finial is an Italian Gothic design found in a Milan Cathedral. It is typically used as…

The stone knob finial is an Italian Gothic design found in a Milan Cathedral. It is typically used as termination in architecture and furniture.

Stone Knob Finial

The stone knob finial is an Italian Gothic design found in a Milan Cathedral. It is typically used as…

The finial is an architectural device, typically carved in stone and employed to decoratively emphasize the apex of a gable, or any of various distinctive ornaments at the top, end, or corner of a building or structure. Smaller finials can be used as a decorative ornament on the ends of curtain rods or applied to chairs and furniture. These are frequently seen on top of bed posts or clocks. Decorative finials are also commonly used to fasten lampshades, and as an ornamental element at the end of the handles of souvenir spoons. Finials can also be decorative members at the ends of curtain rods. An architectural finial can also function as a lightning rod, and was once believed to act as a deterrent to witches on broomsticks attempting to land on one's roof.

Finials

The finial is an architectural device, typically carved in stone and employed to decoratively emphasize…

"The Fountain Trevi." — Young, 1901

Trevi Fountain

"The Fountain Trevi." — Young, 1901

The new Opera House, Frankfort.

Frankfort, Opera House

The new Opera House, Frankfort.

This Frieze is sculptured in wood. It represents a boar hunt in the olden times. It is done in alto-relievo which is a high relief.

Frieze

This Frieze is sculptured in wood. It represents a boar hunt in the olden times. It is done in alto-relievo…

The frieze is a long stretch of a sculpted decoration that is typically found under crown moldings or cornices. This frieze in ornamented with flowers, leaves and groups of fruit.

Frieze

The frieze is a long stretch of a sculpted decoration that is typically found under crown moldings or…

A gable is the triangular part of an exterior wall between the side walls and the slopes of the roof.

Gable

A gable is the triangular part of an exterior wall between the side walls and the slopes of the roof.

"Gable Tower, Dormans, France. A tower finished with gables on two sides or on all four sides, instead of terminating in a spire, a parapet, or otherwise." -Whitney, 1911

Gable Tower in France

"Gable Tower, Dormans, France. A tower finished with gables on two sides or on all four sides, instead…

The home of Charles Dickens in Gadshill, England.

Gadshill

The home of Charles Dickens in Gadshill, England.

Used for throwing water from the gutters ofa building, usually a grotesque monster or animal.

Gargoyle

Used for throwing water from the gutters ofa building, usually a grotesque monster or animal.

"Lady Chapel of Gloucester Cathedral, England, looking toward the nave." -Whitney, 1911

Gloucester Cathedral

"Lady Chapel of Gloucester Cathedral, England, looking toward the nave." -Whitney, 1911

"In contrast to the Berlin school is that of Munich, which was founded by Gärtner. Its influence, which was supported by the renown of many edifices constructed by this architect, such as the Liberty, the University Buildings, and the Ludwigskirche, extended over many other parts of Germany. Without being in any way influenced by the works of Klenze, which are erected in the classical style, such as the Glyptothek, the Pantheon, the Valhalla, and many others, Gärtner's pupils as well as his pupil's pupils, continued in the course of Romantic treatment pointed out to them, and with few exceptions remained steadfast to the Romanesque style."The Glyptothek is a museum in Munich, Germany, which was commissioned by the Bavarian King Ludwig I to house his collection of Greek and Roman sculptures (hence Glypto-, from the Greek root glyphein, to carve). It was designed by Leo von Klenze in the Neoclassical style, and built from 1816 to 1830. Today the museum is a part of the Kunstareal.

Glyptothek at Munich

"In contrast to the Berlin school is that of Munich, which was founded by Gärtner. Its influence,…

"The ghats, or landing places that line the banks of the rivers of Northern India, are often of great architectural merit." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Ghat, Goosla

"The ghats, or landing places that line the banks of the rivers of Northern India, are often of great…

Salisbury Cathedral, an example of Gothic archcitecture.

Gothic Architecture - Salisbury Cathedral

Salisbury Cathedral, an example of Gothic archcitecture.

An illustration of the Great Hall of Columns at Karnak.

Great Hall of Columns at Karnak

An illustration of the Great Hall of Columns at Karnak.

Corinthian.

Greek capital

Corinthian.

Corinthian.

Greek column

Corinthian.

"Griffe from Vézelay. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the fifteenth century, an ornament on the bases of pillars, connecting the torus with each angle of the plinth." -Whitney, 1911

Griffe

"Griffe from Vézelay. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the fifteenth century,…

"Griffe from Poissy; end of 12th century. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the fifteenth century, an ornament on the bases of pillars, connecting the torus with each angle of the plinth." -Whitney, 1911

Griffe

"Griffe from Poissy; end of 12th century. GRIFFE. In medieval architecture, from the eleventh to the…

The angular curve made by the intersection of two semi-cylinders or arches. It is either regular or irregular.

Groin

The angular curve made by the intersection of two semi-cylinders or arches. It is either regular or…

An arch having an angular curve made by the intersection of two semi-cylinders of arches.

Groined-arch

An arch having an angular curve made by the intersection of two semi-cylinders of arches.

Guesten Hall, Winchester, where Pilgrims were lodged on their way to Canterbury.

Guesten Hall

Guesten Hall, Winchester, where Pilgrims were lodged on their way to Canterbury.

"Halifax Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Halifax

"Halifax Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

The Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College, the original "Hall of Fame" in the United States, is a New York landmark institution founded in 1900 to honor prominent Americans who have had a significant impact on this nation's history.

The Hall of Fame for Great Americans

The Hall of Fame for Great Americans at Bronx Community College, the original "Hall of Fame" in the…

"A beam only reaching partially across an opening." — Williams, 1889

Hammer-beam

"A beam only reaching partially across an opening." — Williams, 1889

In architecture, not standing on a foundation, but supported on a corbel. It is applied chiefly as a decoration.

Hanging Buttress

In architecture, not standing on a foundation, but supported on a corbel. It is applied chiefly as a…

"The Greeks and Romans used hinges exactly like those now in common use. The following cut exhibits four Roman hinges of bronze, now preserved in the British Museum." — Anthon, 1891

Roman hinges

"The Greeks and Romans used hinges exactly like those now in common use. The following cut exhibits…

"Church at Hitterdal, Norway." —D'Anvers, 1895

Church at Hitterdal

"Church at Hitterdal, Norway." —D'Anvers, 1895

Front view of a stone house.

House

Front view of a stone house.

Side view of a stone house.

House

Side view of a stone house.

"The French town houses differ, moreover, essentially in entire design, which influences their style, from those of other countries. This remark does not apply to those houses which are calculated for one family only, nor to the palatial residences of the nobility and plutocracy, which the French call Hôtels. This difference partly consists in the universal employment of the ground-floor as shops, which are only separated from the street by an opening which is glazed over and supported by individual iron girders. The whole façade consequently appears rather to be suspended in the air than supported architecturally. Over the shop, there is almost always an entresol, that is to say, a low storey between the ground floor and the first storey. The restriction to a certain height which the façade may not exceed has a determinating influence on the form of the topmost portion of the building, inasmuch as above this height the façade is terminated by an offset which slopes backwards over the upper storey [shown here]. Projecting balconies are, moreover, usual along the whole length of the façades, making the divisions into storeys. When these balconies are not met with, the windows of each storey come down to the top of the storey below, or at any rate nearly so, and have iron balustrades in front of them; this construction is partly owing to the storeys from their great number being so low that without this remedy the windows would appear too small and badly proportioned. The lowness of the storeys necessarily exercises a prejudicial effect on the architectural beauty of the façades; so that it is difficult to impart any structural significance to the houses, which consequently only convey and sense of beauty through their details."

Façade of a House in Paris

"The French town houses differ, moreover, essentially in entire design, which influences their style,…

Houses at Cluny, a town in East-Central France.

Houses at Cluny

Houses at Cluny, a town in East-Central France.

Houses at Orleans a commune in north-central France.

Houses at Orleans

Houses at Orleans a commune in north-central France.

Houses at Sarlat a commune in southwestern France.

Houses at Sarlat

Houses at Sarlat a commune in southwestern France.

Part of ancient Roman architecture, a basin in the atrium or entrance hall of a building, to receive rain

Impluvium

Part of ancient Roman architecture, a basin in the atrium or entrance hall of a building, to receive…

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Impost, Continuous

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Impost, Discontinuous

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Impost, Shafted

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Ionic Column

Ionic Column

Ionic Column

One of the three orders of classical architecture. It originated in the mid-6th century BC.

Ionic Order

One of the three orders of classical architecture. It originated in the mid-6th century BC.

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being practiced in mainland Greece in the 5th century BC. The first of the great Ionic temples was the Temple of Hera on Samos, built about 570 BC–560 BC by the architect Rhoikos. It stood for only a decade before it was leveled by an earthquake. It was in the great sanctuary of the goddess: it could scarcely have been in a more prominent location for its brief lifetime. A longer-lasting 6th century Ionic temple was the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Greek Ionic Order

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being…

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being practiced in mainland Greece in the 5th century BC. The first of the great Ionic temples was the Temple of Hera on Samos, built about 570 BC–560 BC by the architect Rhoikos. It stood for only a decade before it was leveled by an earthquake. It was in the great sanctuary of the goddess: it could scarcely have been in a more prominent location for its brief lifetime. A longer-lasting 6th century Ionic temple was the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Greek Ionic Order (Side View)

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being…

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being practiced in mainland Greece in the 5th century BC. The first of the great Ionic temples was the Temple of Hera on Samos, built about 570 BC-560 BC by the architect Rhoikos. It stood for only a decade before it was leveled by an earthquake. It was in the great sanctuary of the goddess: it could scarcely have been in a more prominent location for its brief lifetime. A longer-lasting 6th century Ionic temple was the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Roman Ionic Order

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being…

The Bank of Ireland.

Bank of Ireland

The Bank of Ireland.

"The door in front of a temple, as it reeached nearly to the ceiling allowed the worshippers to view from without the entire statue of the divinity, and to observe the rites performed before it. The whole light of the building, moreover, was commonly admitted through the same aperture. These circumstances are illustrated in the following cut, showing the front of a small temple of Jupiter taken from an ancient bas-relief." — Anthon, 1891

Temple of Jupiter

"The door in front of a temple, as it reeached nearly to the ceiling allowed the worshippers to view…

"The upright centre beam of a compound girder." — Williams, 1889

King-post

"The upright centre beam of a compound girder." — Williams, 1889

"Two-light lancet." —D'Anvers, 1895

Two-light lancet

"Two-light lancet." —D'Anvers, 1895

"The Benedictine system enjoined three virtues as essential; solitude, humility, and obedience." — Young, 1901

Cloister of the Lateran

"The Benedictine system enjoined three virtues as essential; solitude, humility, and obedience." —…

"In this city many individual tendencies are perceptible, but the predominant inclination is toward the Italian Renaissance . The new Opera-House, built by Van der Nüll and Siccardsburg, forms an exception to this rule, the design and forms of which were copied from the Early French Renaissance, with its narrow moulding and flat elliptical arches. On the other hand, the models of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries are chosen for churches built in the Gothic style. In its richest phase this is seen in the memorial church, built by Ferstel; and in its poorest aspect, and divested of all the ornamental details necessary to produce a good effect, in the Lazaristen Kirche, built by Schmidt, one of the most important representatives of the Gothic style, and at the same time an advocate in word and deed for its reintroduction."The Lazaristenkirche is a Roman Catholic church building in the 7th district of Vienna, Neubau.

Lazarist Church at Vienna

"In this city many individual tendencies are perceptible, but the predominant inclination is toward…

Les Heures, an engraving by Geoffroy Tory.

Les Heures

Les Heures, an engraving by Geoffroy Tory.

"A tower or other elevated structure bearing a light at the top and erected at the entrance of a harbor or on some rock or headland to serve as a guide or warning of danger to navigators at night." -Foster, 1921

Lighthouse

"A tower or other elevated structure bearing a light at the top and erected at the entrance of a harbor…