"Caryatid Porch of the Erechtheium." —D'Anvers, 1895

Caryatid porch

"Caryatid Porch of the Erechtheium." —D'Anvers, 1895

"Nikolai Kirche, Potsdam." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Potsdam

"Nikolai Kirche, Potsdam." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Prostyle, in architecture, applied to a portico in which the columns stand out quite free from the wall of the building to which it is attached; also applied to a temple or other structure having pillars in front only." -Marshall

Plan view of a Prostyle Temple

"Prostyle, in architecture, applied to a portico in which the columns stand out quite free from the…

"Crane Public Library, Quincy, Mass." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Public Library

"Crane Public Library, Quincy, Mass." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Exterior of the Pylon of the Temple of Edfu.

Pylon of the Temple of Edfu

Exterior of the Pylon of the Temple of Edfu.

"Gopura, or gate pyramid to a Hindu temple." —D'Anvers, 1895

Gate pyramid

"Gopura, or gate pyramid to a Hindu temple." —D'Anvers, 1895

An illustration of two pyramids. A pyramid is a building where the upper surfaces are triangular and converge on one point. The base of pyramids are usually quadrilateral or trilateral (but generally may be of any polygon shape), meaning that a pyramid usually has three or four sides. A pyramid's design, with the majority of the weight closer to the ground, means that less material higher up on the pyramid will be pushing down from above.

Pyramids

An illustration of two pyramids. A pyramid is a building where the upper surfaces are triangular and…

"The Quatrefoil is a piercing or panel divided by cusps or foliations into four leaves, or more correctly the leaf-shaped figure formed by the cusps. The name is also given to flowers and leaves of a similar form carved as ornaments on moldings, etc. It differs from the cinquefoil only in the number of cusps."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Quatrefoil

"The Quatrefoil is a piercing or panel divided by cusps or foliations into four leaves, or more correctly…

In field fortification, the simplest kind of work employed, consisting of two parapets of earth raised so as to form a salient angle, with the apex towards the enemy and unprotected on the rear. Several redans connected by curtains form lines of intrenchment.

Redans

In field fortification, the simplest kind of work employed, consisting of two parapets of earth raised…

"Architectural Refinement from Church of St. Quentin, France ... deviations from the geometrical accuracy of purely structural lines, which have been found widely distributed in architecture before the most modern era." -Whitney, 1911

Refinement

"Architectural Refinement from Church of St. Quentin, France ... deviations from the geometrical…

"Regency Style; motive from Hotel Soubise, Paris ... in the history of the fine arts in France, a name given to work which corresponds to the Regency (1715-23) of Philip of Orleans during the minority of Louis XV." -Whitney, 1911

Regency Style

"Regency Style; motive from Hotel Soubise, Paris ... in the history of the fine arts in France,…

"It is a gorgeous structure decorated with statues, carvings, and gold leaf, situated close by the Thiergarten." —Carpenter, 1902

Reichstag

"It is a gorgeous structure decorated with statues, carvings, and gold leaf, situated close by the Thiergarten."…

Rochester Castle and grounds

Rochester Castle

Rochester Castle and grounds

A tall stone structure.

Roman edifice

A tall stone structure.

"The same house, as it might be. notice the fine effect of the windows." —Kinne, 1920

Gambrel roof

"The same house, as it might be. notice the fine effect of the windows." —Kinne, 1920

Native American ruins in Central American.

Central American Ruins

Native American ruins in Central American.

"Rustication was first treated systematically by the architects of the Renaissance in Tuscany, especially in Florence." -Whitney, 1911

Rustication

"Rustication was first treated systematically by the architects of the Renaissance in Tuscany, especially…

"Interior of S. Clemente in Rome." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

S. Clemente

"Interior of S. Clemente in Rome." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"S. Francesca Romana from the Palatine." — Young, 1901

S. Francesca Romana

"S. Francesca Romana from the Palatine." — Young, 1901

"San Clemente is an excellent example of the primitive church. The side enterance generally used is in the Via S. Giovanni. The main enterance, in the Via S. Clemente, opens on to an atrium with a colonnade of Ionic columns." — Young, 1901

Interior of San Clemente

"San Clemente is an excellent example of the primitive church. The side enterance generally used is…

"Interior of the Basilica of San Paolo, Rome." —D'Anvers, 1895

Basilica of San Paolo

"Interior of the Basilica of San Paolo, Rome." —D'Anvers, 1895

"Sant Apollinare in Classe, at Ravenna." —D'Anvers, 1895

Sant Apollinare

"Sant Apollinare in Classe, at Ravenna." —D'Anvers, 1895

Santa Maria in Cosmedin is a minor basilica church in Rome, Italy.

Santa Maria in Cosmedin

Santa Maria in Cosmedin is a minor basilica church in Rome, Italy.

"Temple of Saturn, Tabularium and Tower of Capitol." — Young, 1901

Temple of Saturn

"Temple of Saturn, Tabularium and Tower of Capitol." — Young, 1901

Tower of Sompting church, Essex. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture, its period being from the conversion of England to Christianity till the conquest or near it, when Norman architecture began to prevail.

Church Saxon Architecture

Tower of Sompting church, Essex. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture,…

Long and short work. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture, its period being from the conversion of England to Christianity till the conquest or near it, when Norman architecture began to prevail.

Long and Short Saxon Architecture

Long and short work. Saxon Architecture is the earliest stage of native English architecture, its period…

In ancient architecture, a sort of second plinth or block under a column statue, to raise it.

Scamillus

In ancient architecture, a sort of second plinth or block under a column statue, to raise it.

The scamillus is the piece of stone sitting directly underneath a column.

Scamillus

The scamillus is the piece of stone sitting directly underneath a column.

"An open-air schoolroom in Sacramento, California. The inclosed room is used only in bad weather." — Ritchie, 1918

Open-air schoolroom

"An open-air schoolroom in Sacramento, California. The inclosed room is used only in bad weather." —…

"American Seaside Villa." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Seaside Home

"American Seaside Villa." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

The sedilia in Southwell Minster, England. In church architecture, a sedile is a seat near the altar used by priests and deacons.

Sedilia

The sedilia in Southwell Minster, England. In church architecture, a sedile is a seat near the altar…

"Arch of Severus, Column of Phocas, and S. Martina." — Young, 1901

Arch of Severus

"Arch of Severus, Column of Phocas, and S. Martina." — Young, 1901

The Sheffield Town Hall was officially opened by Queen Victoria in 1897. The architect was Mr. E. W. Mountford.

Sheffield

The Sheffield Town Hall was officially opened by Queen Victoria in 1897. The architect was Mr. E. W.…

"Shell-work, Hôtel Cluny, Paris. In decorative design, especially carved or modeled, a motive which imitates or is suggested by the forms of shells." -Whitney, 1911

Shell Work

"Shell-work, Hôtel Cluny, Paris. In decorative design, especially carved or modeled, a motive…

"The pagoda forms a very prominent feature in the architecture of Further India. A specimen of the Burmese style of temples is presented in the Shoemadoo." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Pagoda, Shoemadoo

"The pagoda forms a very prominent feature in the architecture of Further India. A specimen of the Burmese…

Clapboard or bevel siding is the horizontal and overlapping style of laying board on the exterior of a house. "C, clapboard siding, g being rabbeted at the lower margins and g' simply overlapped." -Whitney, 1911

Clapboard Siding

Clapboard or bevel siding is the horizontal and overlapping style of laying board on the exterior of…

The Cathedral of Siena is a Roman Catholic Marian church located in Siena, central Italy. A medieval church, it was completed in 1263. The interior of the church is designed with black and white marble stripes on the columns and the walls. These black and white stripes represent the coat of arms of Siena. The entire floor of the church is covered with an inlaid marble mosaic.

Cathedral of Sienna

The Cathedral of Siena is a Roman Catholic Marian church located in Siena, central Italy. A medieval…

"Egyptian Sphinx."—D'Anvers, 1895

Sphinx

"Egyptian Sphinx."—D'Anvers, 1895

"Interior of St. Clemente in Rome." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

Interior of St Clemente

"Interior of St. Clemente in Rome." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

"Interior, St. Clare's, Liverpool." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

St. Clare's

"Interior, St. Clare's, Liverpool." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"St. Martins-in-the-fields." —D'Anvers, 1895

St. Martins-in-the-fields

"St. Martins-in-the-fields." —D'Anvers, 1895

"facade of old St Peter's, Rome." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

Old Facade of St. Peter's

"facade of old St Peter's, Rome." — Encyclopediia Britannica, 1910

"St. Saturnin at Toulouse." —D'Anvers, 1895

St. Saturnin

"St. Saturnin at Toulouse." —D'Anvers, 1895

"Staircase, Imperial Institute." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Staircase

"Staircase, Imperial Institute." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

An illustration if a large staircase.

Large Staircase

An illustration if a large staircase.

Stonehenge is a pre-historic monument located in Wiltshire, England. It is one of the most famous monuments in the world, with large standing stones that are placed in a circular form. It also was a burial site with hundreds of burial mounds.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a pre-historic monument located in Wiltshire, England. It is one of the most famous monuments…

"A bit of Stonehenge. The earliest architectural monument in Britain."—Gordy, 1912

Stonehenge

"A bit of Stonehenge. The earliest architectural monument in Britain."—Gordy, 1912

The painting symbol is a modern design that symbolizes architecture. It was designed by sculptor Hauptmann Dresden.

Sculpture Painting

The painting symbol is a modern design that symbolizes architecture. It was designed by sculptor Hauptmann…

The sculpture symbol is a modern design that symbolizes architecture. It was designed by sculptor Hauptmann Dresden.

Sculpture Symbol

The sculpture symbol is a modern design that symbolizes architecture. It was designed by sculptor Hauptmann…

Tabard Inn

Tabard Inn

Tabard Inn

The Tacoma Building in Chicago, Illinois was the first steel-construction building erected.

Tacoma Building

The Tacoma Building in Chicago, Illinois was the first steel-construction building erected.

The Taj Mahal, an Indian tomb

Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal, an Indian tomb

"The great pagoda at Tanjore is by far the grandest temple in India, resting on a base 83 feet suare, rises in fourteen stories to a height of nearly 200 feet." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Temple, Tanjore

"The great pagoda at Tanjore is by far the grandest temple in India, resting on a base 83 feet suare,…

This Assyrian Temple is located in present day Khorsabad, Northern Iraq. Khorsobad was the Assyrian capital during the reign of Sargon II of Assyria.

Assyrian Temple

This Assyrian Temple is located in present day Khorsabad, Northern Iraq. Khorsobad was the Assyrian…

"Rock-cut temple at Ipsambul, on the Nile." —D'Anvers, 1895

Egyptian temple

"Rock-cut temple at Ipsambul, on the Nile." —D'Anvers, 1895

"The Round temple in the Piazza Bocca Della Verita." — Young, 1901

Round temple

"The Round temple in the Piazza Bocca Della Verita." — Young, 1901

An illustration of the theater of Dionysus at Athens.

Theater of Dionysus

An illustration of the theater of Dionysus at Athens.

"The Berlin school, whose founder was Schinkel, the architect of the noble Berlin Theatre, and of the Museum, which is noteworthy for its magnificent façade, exhibited a decided inclination towards Grecian architecture, and strove to attain a certain purity of form, and delicacy and elegance in details, which where for the most part carried out in the Grecian style. He had to contend against a deficiency in building material. Owing to want of building-stone, the mouldings, and indeed all the architectural details, were unavoidably carried out in stucco; nor was this all, but in order to give the same durability, they were made to project as little as possible. Consequently this architectural style, with the exception of some few public buildings, seemed flat and wanting in power, especially in the case of private dwelling-houses, and frequently presented the appearance of pasteboard-work, or cabinet-work, rather than of a structural edifice. This facility also which stucco afforded for enriching the façade, caused more attention to be paid to decoration than it was entitled to, for ornament should always be kept in subservience to the main and constructive architectural forms."The Konzerthaus Berlin (once called the Schauspielhaus Berlin) is a concert hall situated on the Gendarmenmarkt square in the central Mitte district of Berlin. Since 1994 it has been the seat of the German orchestra Konzerthausorchester Berlin.The building's predecessor, the National-Theater in the Friedrichstadt suburb, was destroyed by fire in 1817. It had been designed by Carl Gotthard Langhans and inaugurated on January 1, 1802. The hall was redesigned by Karl Friedrich Schinkel between 1818 and 1821, and the new inauguration of the Königliches Schauspielhaus on June 18, 1821 featured the acclaimed premiere of Carl Maria von Weber's opera Der Freischütz. Other works that have premiered at the theatre include Undine by E. T. A. Hoffmann in 1816 and Penthesilea by Heinrich von Kleist in 1876.After World War I the Schauspielhaus reopened under the name of Preußisches Staatstheater Berlin in October 1919. Under the direction of Leopold Jessner it soon became one of the leading theatres of the Weimar Republic, a tradtion ambivalently continued by his successor Gustav Gründgens after the Nazi takeover in 1933, including his famous staging of Goethe's Faust and the premiere of Gerhart Hauptmann's tragedy Iphigenie in Delphi in 1941.Severely damaged by Allied bombing and the Battle of Berlin the building has been rebuilt from 1977 on and reopened as the concert hall of the Berliner Sinfonie-Orchester in 1984. The exterior, including many of the sculptures of composers by Christian Friedrich Tieck and Balthasar Jacob Rathgeber, is a faithful reconstruction of Schinkel's designs, while the interior was adapted in a Neoclassical style meeting the conditions of the altered use. The great hall is equipped with a notable four-manual pipe organ including 74 stops and 5811 pipes.

Theatre at Berlin

"The Berlin school, whose founder was Schinkel, the architect of the noble Berlin Theatre, and of the…

"The Berlin school, whose founder was Schinkel, the architect of the noble Berlin Theatre, and of the Museum, which is noteworthy for its magnificent façade, exhibited a decided inclination towards Grecian architecture, and strove to attain a certain purity of form, and delicacy and elegance in details, which where for the most part carried out in the Grecian style. He had to contend against a deficiency in building material. Owing to want of building-stone, the mouldings, and indeed all the architectural details, were unavoidably carried out in stucco; nor was this all, but in order to give the same durability, they were made to project as little as possible. Consequently this architectural style, with the exception of some few public buildings, seemed flat and wanting in power, especially in the case of private dwelling-houses, and frequently presented the appearance of pasteboard-work, or cabinet-work, rather than of a structural edifice. This facility also which stucco afforded for enriching the façade, caused more attention to be paid to decoration than it was entitled to, for ornament should always be kept in subservience to the main and constructive architectural forms."The Altes Museum (German for Old Museum), is one of several internationally renowned museums on Berlin's Museum Island in Berlin, Germany. Since restoration work in 1966, it houses the antique collection (Antikensammlung) of the Berlin State Museums. The museum was built between 1825 and 1828 by the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel in the neoclassical style to house the Prussian Royal family's art collection. Until 1845, it was called the Royal Museum.

Theatre at Berlin

"The Berlin school, whose founder was Schinkel, the architect of the noble Berlin Theatre, and of the…

"In Dresden, owing to the method of instruction in the technical schools, as well as to the influence of the buildings, as, for instance, those by Zwinger, and the new theatre by Semper, the Renaissance style is the one preferred by the architects who have been there educated."The Semperoper is the opera house of the Saxon State Opera Dresden (German: Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden) and the concert hall of the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden in Dresden, Germany. It was first built in 1841, by architect Gottfried Semper.The building style itself is debated among many, as it has features that appear in the Early Renaissance style, Baroque and even features Corinthian style pillars typical of classical Greece (classical revival). Perhaps the most suitable label for this style would be Eclecticism; where influences from many styles are used- a practice most common during this period.It had to be rebuilt after a fire destroyed it in 1869. The citizenry demanded that Gottfried Semper do the reconstruction, even though he was in exile at the time because of his activities in the May Uprising in Dresden in 1849. So the architect had his son Manfred Semper complete the second opera house with his father's plans. This second one was constructed in Neo-Renaissance style in 1878. During construction, performances were held at the Gewerbehausall, which opened in 1870.The building is considered to be a prime example of "Dresden-Baroque" architecture. It is situated on the Theater Square in central Dresden on the bank of the Elbe River. On top of the portal there is a Panther quadriga with a statue of Dionysos. The interior was created by such famous architects of the time as Johannes Schilling. Monuments on the portal depict famous artists such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller, William Shakespeare, Sophocles, Molière and Euripides. The building also features work by Ernst Rietschel and Ernst Julius Hähnel.In the pre-war years, the building premiered many of the works of Richard Strauss.During the last weeks of World War II in 1945 the building was destroyed again - this time by Allied bombing and the subsequent fire storms. Exactly 40 years later, on February 13, 1985 the opera was rebuilt almost the same as it was before the war. It reopened with the same opera that was performed last before the destruction in 1945: Weber's Der Freischütz.During the flood of the Elbe in 2002 the building suffered heavy water damage. With substantial help from around the world, it reopened in December 2002.Today, most operas are accompanied by the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden.

Theatre at Dresden

"In Dresden, owing to the method of instruction in the technical schools, as well as to the influence…