"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans possessed in their own houses; and from that it came to mean the chamber which contained the bath. When the baths of private individuals became more sumptuous, and comprised many rooms, the plural balnea or balinea was adopted, which still, in correct language, had reference only to the baths of private persons. Balneae and balineae, which have no singular number, were the public baths. But this accuracy of diction is neglected by many of the subsequent writers. This image is Fresco from the Thermae of Titus." — Smith, 1873

Balneum

"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans…

"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans possessed in their own houses; and from that it came to mean the chamber which contained the bath. When the baths of private individuals became more sumptuous, and comprised many rooms, the plural balnea or balinea was adopted, which still, in correct language, had reference only to the baths of private persons. Balneae and balineae, which have no singular number, were the public baths. But this accuracy of diction is neglected by many of the subsequent writers. This image shows the strigiles and guttus that the Romans used to scrape off perspiration." — Smith, 1873

Balneum

"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans…

Bathing was an important part in Ancient Roman culture and society. In Germany there are These Roman baths varied from simple to exceedingly elaborate structures. In taking a Roman bath, the bather induced sweating by gradually exposing himself to increasing temperatures. To accommodate this ritual, all Roman bathhouses contained a series of rooms which got progressively hotter. Most contained a room just inside the entrance where the bather stored his clothes. After taking a series of sweat and/or immersion baths, the bather returned to the cooler tepidarium (a warm room) for a massage with oils and final scraping with metal implements. Today ruins of Roman baths remain in three German cities, Trier, Baden-Baden, and Baden-Württemberg.

Ancient Roman Baths

Bathing was an important part in Ancient Roman culture and society. In Germany there are These Roman…