"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans possessed in their own houses; and from that it came to mean the chamber which contained the bath. When the baths of private individuals became more sumptuous, and comprised many rooms, the plural balnea or balinea was adopted, which still, in correct language, had reference only to the baths of private persons. Balneae and balineae, which have no singular number, were the public baths. But this accuracy of diction is neglected by many of the subsequent writers. This image is Fresco from the Thermae of Titus." — Smith, 1873

Balneum

"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans…

"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans possessed in their own houses; and from that it came to mean the chamber which contained the bath. When the baths of private individuals became more sumptuous, and comprised many rooms, the plural balnea or balinea was adopted, which still, in correct language, had reference only to the baths of private persons. Balneae and balineae, which have no singular number, were the public baths. But this accuracy of diction is neglected by many of the subsequent writers. This image shows the strigiles and guttus that the Romans used to scrape off perspiration." — Smith, 1873

Balneum

"Balneum or balineum signifies, in its primary sense, a bath or bathing vessel, such as most Romans…

Bathing was an important part in Ancient Roman culture and society. In Germany there are These Roman baths varied from simple to exceedingly elaborate structures. In taking a Roman bath, the bather induced sweating by gradually exposing himself to increasing temperatures. To accommodate this ritual, all Roman bathhouses contained a series of rooms which got progressively hotter. Most contained a room just inside the entrance where the bather stored his clothes. After taking a series of sweat and/or immersion baths, the bather returned to the cooler tepidarium (a warm room) for a massage with oils and final scraping with metal implements. Today ruins of Roman baths remain in three German cities, Trier, Baden-Baden, and Baden-Württemberg.

Ancient Roman Baths

Bathing was an important part in Ancient Roman culture and society. In Germany there are These Roman…

"Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Caracalla was eldest son of the Emperor Severus, born in Lyons, A.D. 188. On the death of his father he succeeded to the throne with his brother, Antoninus Geta, whom he speedily murdered. Among the buildings of Caracalla in Rome, the baths-Thermæ Caracallæ- near Porta Capena, were most celebrated, and their ruins are still magnificent."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Hall in Baths of Caracalla

"Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Caracalla was eldest son of the Emperor Severus, born in Lyons, A.D. 188.…

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and 216, during the reign of the emperor Caracalla. At the time the baths included marble seats for bathers, a public library, gymnasiums and restaurants.

Ruins of the Baths of Caracalla

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and…

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and 216, during the reign of the emperor Caracalla. At the time the baths included marble seats for bathers, a public library, gymnasiums and restaurants.

Ruins of the Baths of Caracalla

The ruins of the baths of Caracalla were roman public baths built in Rome, Italy between AD 212 and…

"The Farnese Hercules (Colossal). Found in 1540 in the Baths of Caracalla. In the Naples Museum." —D'Anvers, 1895

Farnese Hercules

"The Farnese Hercules (Colossal). Found in 1540 in the Baths of Caracalla. In the Naples Museum." —D'Anvers,…

"Section of the Baths of Pompeii." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Pompeii Baths

"Section of the Baths of Pompeii." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"The baths of Titus, the name of each part of the building is inscribed on it. The small dome inscribed laconicum directly over the furnace, and having the clypeus over it, will be observed in the corner of the chamber named concamerata sudatio. The vessels for water are inscribed, according to their temperature, with the same names as some of the chambers, frigidarium, tepisdarium, and calidarium." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Roman Baths

"The baths of Titus, the name of each part of the building is inscribed on it. The small dome inscribed…

"Section of the Bath discovered at Tusculum, showing the calidarium (hot room)." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Tusculum Bath

"Section of the Bath discovered at Tusculum, showing the calidarium (hot room)." — Encyclopedia…