"Ten to fiteen inches long, of a brownish or grayish color, spotted with black. On each side of the neck there is a large aperture, within which there are branchial arches: they are also projecting branched gills attached to the opercula or flaps, which close these orifices." — Goodrich, 1859

Axolotl

"Ten to fiteen inches long, of a brownish or grayish color, spotted with black. On each side of the…

"Figure 1 represents the embryo as it appears several days after the egg is deposited." — Goodrich. 1859

Embryo

"Figure 1 represents the embryo as it appears several days after the egg is deposited." — Goodrich.…

"Figure 2 gives an outline of its form; the arrows at the side of the head show the currents of water which are seen to flow to the branchiae by the breathing of the young animal." — Goodrich. 1859

Form of the embryo

"Figure 2 gives an outline of its form; the arrows at the side of the head show the currents of water…

The skeleton of a frog.

Frog skeleton

The skeleton of a frog.

Nearing the end of its development, a gradually shrinking tail is all that remains of the tadpole.

Frog with tail

Nearing the end of its development, a gradually shrinking tail is all that remains of the tadpole.

"The common frog of Europe, a common and well-known animal." — Goodrich. 1859

Common frog

"The common frog of Europe, a common and well-known animal." — Goodrich. 1859

"It is rather larger than the common frog, and its nocturnal croakings are so loud and disagreeable, that temporary dwellers in the neighborhood of ponds frequented by it, are often prevented from sleeping by its clamorous chorus. It is this species that is most approved of on the continent for culinary purposes." — Goodrich, 1859

Edible frog

"It is rather larger than the common frog, and its nocturnal croakings are so loud and disagreeable,…

"It is one to two feet long, dark slate color, feeds on worms, crawfish, fishes, and aquatic reptiles. It is very voracious, and nothing it can master is spared." — Goodrich, 1859

Alleghany hell-bender

"It is one to two feet long, dark slate color, feeds on worms, crawfish, fishes, and aquatic reptiles.…

"Two feet long, black above and dusky beneath. It is of an eel-like form, lives in the muddy water of the rice swamps, and feeds on worms and insects." — Goodrich, 1859

Siren lacretina

"Two feet long, black above and dusky beneath. It is of an eel-like form, lives in the muddy water of…

"It is three and a half inches long, the skin smooth as a frog's; it lives in ponds and ditches, and is devoured in great quantites by fish of various kinds.' — Goodrich, 1859

Smooth newt

"It is three and a half inches long, the skin smooth as a frog's; it lives in ponds and ditches, and…

A pollywog, another phase of tadpole development.

Pollywog

A pollywog, another phase of tadpole development.

"Is five to seven inches long,; blueish-black, with bright yellow spots; habits nocturnal, living under rocks, stones, and decaying trees, found from Maine to Maryland." — Goodrich, 1859

Violet-colored salamander

"Is five to seven inches long,; blueish-black, with bright yellow spots; habits nocturnal, living under…

"The Land Salamanders, unlike the Tritons, are ovo-viparous, though the young at first inhabit the water and undergo metamorphoses till they arrive at the mature state which fits them for living on land, where they haunt cool and moist places, being not unfrequently found about fallen timber or old walls. Their food primarily consists of insects, worms, and small molluscous animals." — Goodrich, 1859

Salamanders

"The Land Salamanders, unlike the Tritons, are ovo-viparous, though the young at first inhabit the water…

A developing tadpole.

A developing tadpole

A developing tadpole.

A developing tadpole.

Developing tadpole

A developing tadpole.

A developing tadpole.

Developing tadpole

A developing tadpole.

A tadpole developing, with small rear legs beginning to form.

Developing tadpole

A tadpole developing, with small rear legs beginning to form.

A close up view of the head of a developing embryonic tadpole.

A developing tadpole's head

A close up view of the head of a developing embryonic tadpole.

"Figure 5 shows the form of the tadpole when first hatched, which usually takes place about four weeks after depositing the egg." — Goodrich. 1859

Newly hatched tadpole

"Figure 5 shows the form of the tadpole when first hatched, which usually takes place about four weeks…

"It is a harmless animal, though its ungainly appearance has made it the subject of general aversion." — Goodrich, 1859

Common European toad

"It is a harmless animal, though its ungainly appearance has made it the subject of general aversion."…

"Resembles the common toad of Europe in appearance: there are also other foreign species, among which is the accoucheur toad, which not only assists the female in excluding her eggs, but attaches them afterwards to his own hind-legs, where the young are developed until they arrive at the tadpole state, when he visists the water and the escape. This species is common in the vicinity of Paris." — Goodrich, 1859

Natter-jack toad

"Resembles the common toad of Europe in appearance: there are also other foreign species, among which…

"Is of a brownish or light ash-color, and is found under logs and the bark of decayed trees." — Goodrich, 1859

Squirrel tree-toad

"Is of a brownish or light ash-color, and is found under logs and the bark of decayed trees." —…

"At the breeding season the back of the female exhbits a number of small pits; into these pits the male collects the eggs laid by the female in the edge of the water, and presses them down; they are then covered by a natural operculum, and there they are hatched, in the same manner as the free larvae of the other Batrachians." — Goodrich, 1859

Surinam toad

"At the breeding season the back of the female exhbits a number of small pits; into these pits the male…

The common warty-newt of Europe... is six inches long, and is common in large ponds and ditches, where it feeds voraciously on aquatic insects and other small animals, such as tadpoles, newts, etc.". It swims chiefly by its tail" — Goodrich, 1859

Common warty-newt

The common warty-newt of Europe... is six inches long, and is common in large ponds and ditches, where…