A man trying to touch the base before the baseman catches the pass.

Base

A man trying to touch the base before the baseman catches the pass.

A game of baseball seen from the left side of home plate.

Baseball

A game of baseball seen from the left side of home plate.

The batter and catcher playing baseball.

Baseball game

The batter and catcher playing baseball.

A baseball player ready at bat.

Baseball Player

A baseball player ready at bat.

A game of baseball seen from the right of home plate. It shows the batter and the catcher.

Batter

A game of baseball seen from the right of home plate. It shows the batter and the catcher.

A view of the catcher in a game of baseball.

Catcher

A view of the catcher in a game of baseball.

"Curtain, in Fortification, is the portion of rampart or wall between two bastions or two gates. In a regular siege, to batter down the curtain is one of the main operations depended on; and many of the external works constructed by the defenders are intended to frustrate, or at least embarrass, this operation. In the annexed cut, which shows a ground-plan of some of the elements of a regular fortification, FF' is the curtain; HAEF, a bastion. The component parts of the bastion are thus designated: AH and AE, two faces; EF and GH, two flanks; A, the salient; FG, the gorge; and H and E, the shoulders. mn is the rampart; mo, the parapet on the rampart; QPQ', the ditch; NO, the covery-way; RWR', the glacis; KLL', a ravelin." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Curtain

"Curtain, in Fortification, is the portion of rampart or wall between two bastions or two gates. In…

A man trying to catch a ground ball.

Fielder

A man trying to catch a ground ball.

An outfielder trying to catch a pop fly.

Outfielder

An outfielder trying to catch a pop fly.

"The battering ram was a large beam, made of the trunk of a tree, and having a mass of bronze or iron fastened to one end, and resembling a ram's head. This shape, as well as its name, was given to the engine in question, on account of the resemblence of its mode of action to that of a ram butting with its forehead. In an improved form, the ram was surrounded with iron bands, to which rings were attached for the purpose of suspending it by ropes or chains to a beam fixed transversely over it. See the lower figure." — Anthon, 1891

Battering ram

"The battering ram was a large beam, made of the trunk of a tree, and having a mass of bronze or iron…

A player attempting to slide in to base.

Sliding

A player attempting to slide in to base.