"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862. As soon as the order to advance was given the brigade moved forward, until it came to the open field, in perfect silence. As soon as it was clear from the woods, with a cheer that could have been heard all over the battle ground, it took the double-quick, and though at every step its ranks grew thinner from the murderous fire through which it passed, yet there was no faltering, no hesitancy; onward, across the field, up the slope and into and through the woods it went, until it met the second line of the enemy's overpowering forces. Forced at last to yield to overwhelming odds, it retired over the ground gained at such a frightful cost until it reached the cover from which it started. Here what remained held their position until the third brigade could come to its support. When exhausted, cut to pieces, its officers all gone, with no one to direct it, those who survived gathered as fast as thy could, and in the morning all that was left of that brigade was less than seven hundred men." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar…

"The Confederate batteries shelling the Federal position on the night of the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862- wounded men lying on the ground, McDowell's division marching on the field. The scene at night was very striking. It was past ten o'clock, and there was a bright moonlight and a clear blue sky. The Federal troops were on a rising ground, while the enemy's batteries were shelling from the woods, the Federal batteries replying, and one by one driving them further back. The hospital was near the Federal position, and wounded men wre lying on the ground, waiting their turn to receive surgical attention. Near them were groups of stragglers, ambulances, ammunition wagons, etc." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"The Confederate batteries shelling the Federal position on the night of the Battle of Cedar Mountain,…

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by General Banks and the Confederate Army led by Generals Jackson, Ewell, Winder, etc.- final repulse of the Confederates. General Pope's report of the battle is as follows: "On Saturday, August 9th, 1862, the enemy advanced rapidly to Cedar Mountain, the sides of which they occupied in heavy force. General Banks was instructed to take up his position on the ground occupied by Crawford's brigade, of his command, which had been thrown out the day previous to observe the enemy's movements. He was directed not to advance beyond that point, and if attacked by the enemy to defend his position and send back timely notice. The artillery of the enemy was opened early in the afternoon, but he made no advance until nearly five o'clock, at which time a few skirmishers were thrown forward on each side under cover of the heavy wood in which his force was concealed. The enemy pushed forward a strong force in the rear of his skirmishers, and General Banks advanced to the attack. The engagement did not fairly open until after six o'clock, and for an hour and a half was furious and unceasing. I arrived personally on the field at 7 P.M., and found the action raging furiously. The infantry fire was incessant and severe. I found General Banks holding the position he took up early in the morning. His losses were heavy. Ricketts's division was immediately pushed forward and occupied the right of General Banks, the brigades of Crawford and Gordon being directed to change their position from the right and mass themselves in the centre. Before this change could be effected it was quite dark, though the artillery fire continued at short range without intermission. The artillery fire, at night, by the Second and Fifth Maine batteries in Ricketts's division of General McDowell's corps was most destructive, as was readily observable the next morning in the dead men and horses and broken gun carriages of the enemy's batteries which had been advanced against it. Our troops rested on their arms during the night in line of battle, the heavy shelling being kept up on both sides until midnight. At daylight the next morning the enemy fell back two miles from our front, and still higher up the mountain."" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by…