"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., Friday, May 1st, 1863. We give a fine sketch of the point where the memorable battle of Chancellorsville began. It was at the junction of the Gordonsville Plank Road, the Old Turnpike, and the road from Ely's and United States stores. The first fighting took place here on Friday, May 1st, and on Saturday the Eleventh Corps was routed, and the enemy repulsed by consummate generalship and the most resolute bravery of the Federal troops. Here, too, on Sunday the enemy made an attack with such overhwhelming force as to force the Federal army back to the second line. Few spots possess greater interest than this scene of fearful battle."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., Friday, May 1st, 1863. We give a fine sketch of the point where the…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. Attack on General Sedgwick's Corps. on Monday, May 4th, 1863, at 5 P.M., as seen from Falmouth Heights. After General Sedgwick had carried the fortifications on Sunday, May 3rd, he pushed along the Gordonsville Plank Road in pursuit till night stopped his advance. Before morning the enemy threw a heavy force in his rear, cutting him off from his small force at Fredericksburg on the rear, and began to mass troops on his front and left flank. About half-past five o'clock in the afternoon they began the attack, and columns poured from behind the breastworks and marched down the hill to the plain above the town and opposite Falmouth, receiving, as they came in range, a brisk fire from the Federal artillery beyond the river. Unchecked by this, however, they rushed on Sedgwick's line, which repeatedly repulsed them, falling back, however, gradually to Banks's Ford, which they crossed in the morning on pontoons. In the sketch the breastworks captured on Sunday are seen, with the Confederates passing between them and the river in columns to attack Sedgwick's troops, which are the continuous line in the distance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. Attack on General Sedgwick's Corps. on Monday, May 4th, 1863, at 5…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (1824 - 1863) was on of the most well-known Confederate generals during the Civil War.

General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (1824 - 1863) was on of the most well-known Confederate generals…