"General William S. Rosecrans served during the Civil War and was involved int he battle of Stone River."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

General William S. Rosecrans

"General William S. Rosecrans served during the Civil War and was involved int he battle of Stone River."—E.…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. Decisive charge and capture of Byrne's Confederate battery by the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania and Twnety-first Ohio Volunteers, Friday evening, January 2nd, 1863. Our correspondent's report: 'The capture of Byrne's Confederate battery was a most gallant achievement, and worthy of the finest troops in the world. This battery consisted of two 12-pound Napoleons, two howitzers and one 6-pound rifled cannon. These were admirably served, and did considerable execution. Over it flaunted the colors of the Twenty-sixth Tennessee and the standard of the Fourth Florida Regiment. It was situated on a rising ground in a cornfield, while a forest at the back afforded an excellent retreat. After our troops, under Negley and others, had succeeded in crossing Stone River on Friday afternoon and driven the enemy before them, a general rush was made to storm this battery, which still maintained its fire. The first regiments to reach this were the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania and Twenty-first Ohio Volunteers, under lead of Colonel Miller, who, though wounded, still kept the field, and acted throughout with a valor worthy the days of Washington. Up went our brave boys, bayonet in hand, to the very muzzles of the guns, which still belched death to the advancing line. The guns once reached, the gunners were driven from them by our men, and the battery was our own. The colors of the Twenty-sixth Tennessee Regiment were captured after a desperate resistance, the Confederate color bearer fighting for them till a bayonet thrust through his arm compelled him to drop them.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. Decisive charge and capture of Byrne's Confederate battery by the Seventy-eighth…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the Confederates flying in confusion. We question if a more spirited sketch was ever published than our double-page engraving representing the final charge of General Negley's division, on the afternoon of Friday, January 2nd, 1863, at the battle of Murfreesborough, or Stone River. About four o'clock in the afternoon General Rosecrans, seeing that the critical moment had arrived, gave orders for General Negley to cross the river and drive the enemy from his position. This was done in a manner worthy of the most disciplined troops in the world. The Eighteenth Ohio Regiment dashed into the river, the Nineteenth Illinois and Twenty-first Ohio following close behind. Our artist reported: 'The scene was grand in the extreme. It was indeed a momentous battle on a miniature scale. Nothing could resist our gallant men; on they rushed; the Confederates met the shock then wavered, and then were driven back at the bayonet's point, step by step, for some half mile, when they broke and fled, ever and anon rallying to check our too hasty pursuit. Night fell on the scene, and the victors and vanquished rested from their strife. Thus was won the great battle of Stone River, in which, if ever men met foemen worthy of their steel, they met them then.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Stone River

"Battle of Stone River, Tenn. The decisive charge of General Negley's division across the river- the…

Scene in the afternoon at the Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro was fought from December 31, 1862 to January 2, 1863 in Tennessee in what is known as the Stones River Campaign in the Civil War.

Battle of Stones River Scene

Scene in the afternoon at the Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro…

The Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro was fought from December 31, 1862 to January 2, 1863 in Tennessee in what is known as the Stones River Campaign in the Civil War.

Battle of Stones River

The Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro was fought from December…