"A ball-bearing hub with outward cups. The hub-shell H is turned out of mild steel, and the cups C are forced into the ends of the hub-shell and soldered thereto. A thin washer W is then spun into the end, for the purpose of retaining oil, and a thin internal tube T unites the two cups, and guides the oil fed in at the middle of the hub to the balls. The projecting flanges S are for the attachment of the tangent spokes used to build the hub into the wheel. The spindle A has the two cones screwed on it, one C, against the shoulder, the other C, adjustable. The-spindle ends are passed through the back-fork ends and are there adjusted in position by the chain-tension adjusters. After adjustments the nuts N clamp the spindle securely between the fork-ends. The chain-wheel or free-wheel clutch is screwed on the end of the hub-shell with a right-hand thread." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Ball-bearing Hub

"A ball-bearing hub with outward cups. The hub-shell H is turned out of mild steel, and the cups C are…

a ball bearing is a type of rolling-element bearing which uses balls to maintain the separation between the moving parts of the bearing.

Ball Bearing

a ball bearing is a type of rolling-element bearing which uses balls to maintain the separation between…

The box on a train which contains the bearings for the spindle of an axle, or joural of an axle.

Axle Box

The box on a train which contains the bearings for the spindle of an axle, or joural of an axle.

The box on a train which contains the bearings for the spindle of an axle, or joural of an axle.

Axle Box

The box on a train which contains the bearings for the spindle of an axle, or joural of an axle.

"The usual form of crank-axle bearing which has inward-cups and is cup-adjusting. The end of the bracket is split and the cup after adjustment is clamped in position by the clamping screw S. The usual mode of fastening the cranks to the axle is by round cotters C with a flat surface at a slight angle to the axis, thus forming a wedge, which is driven in tight. The small end of the cotter projects through the crank, and is screwed and held in place by a nut. The chain-wheel at the crank-axis is usually detachable fastened to the right-hand crank." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Crank-axle Bearing

"The usual form of crank-axle bearing which has inward-cups and is cup-adjusting. The end of the bracket…

"One end of the cup-adjusting hub, with inward bearings. The cones are formed of one piece with the spindles, and the adjusting cp C is screwed in the end of the hub shell, and locked in position by the screwed locking-ring R. The figure also illustrates a divided spindle for facilitating the removal of the tire for repair when required without disturbing the wheel, bearings, chain or gear-case. The chain side of the hub-spindle, not shown in the figure, is secured to the frame in the usual way; on the left side the spindle S projects very little beyond the adjusting cup. A distance washer W is placed between the end of the spindle S and the fork-end F. A detachable screw-pin, or the footstep, P, passes through the washer W, and is screwed into the end of the spindle S, the hexagod head of the detachable pin drawing all the parts securely together." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Cup-adjusting Hub

"One end of the cup-adjusting hub, with inward bearings. The cones are formed of one piece with the…

A hinge is a type of bearing that connects two solid objects, typically allowing only a limited angle of rotation between them.

Door Style Hinge

A hinge is a type of bearing that connects two solid objects, typically allowing only a limited angle…

"A slender length of brass resting in a small brass button and designed to stand vertically on the center of a compass glass. From the shadow cast by it the sun's bearing is determined. It may also be used to take compass bearings of other objects." -Whitney, 1911

Shadow Pin

"A slender length of brass resting in a small brass button and designed to stand vertically on the center…