"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great Kanawha. Bellaire is a town situated on the Ohio River, three miles below Wheeling, Va. It is the eastern terminus of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the point for crossing the river connecting the Baltimore and Ohio with the above-named railroad. The place contained a population of fifteen hundred or two thousand inhabitants in 1861. Its importance was owing to its eligible position for the rapid concentration of troops. The sketch represents a fleet of boats lying in the river awaiting the quoata of troops and munitions for the prosecution of the war on the Great Kanawha. At this date, 1896, two weekly newspapers are published here. It has two banks, two churches, also manufactures of window-glass and flintware, nails, pig iron, galvanized ware and agricultural machines. The city is lighted with gas, and has waterworks and a street railway. Coal, limestone and fire-clay abound here. Population, about ten thousand." —Leslie, 1896

Bellaire

"Bellaire, O.- Steamboats conveying troops and munitions of war for the Federal forces on the Great…

"General Hunter, born in Washington, D. C., July 21st, 1802, died there, February 2nd, 1886, was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1822; appointed second lieutenant in the Fifth Infantry; promoted first lieutenant in 1828, and became a captain in the First Dragoons in 1833. He resigned his commission in 1836, and engaged in business in Chicago. He re-entered the military service as a paymaster, with the rank of major, in March, 1842. On May 14th, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the Sixth United States Cavalry, and three days later was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers. He commanded the main column of McDowell's army in the Manassas campaign, and was severely wounded at Bull Run, July 21st, 1861. He was made a major general of volunteers, August 13th, 1861; served under General Fremont in Missouri, and on November 2nd succeeded him in the command of the Western Department. In March, 1862, General Hunter was transferred to the Department of the South, with headquarters at Port Royal, S. C. In May, 1864, he was placed in command of the Department of West Virginia. He defeated considerable force at Piedmont on June 5th. He was brevetted major general, United States Army, march 13th, 1865, and mustered out of the volunteer service in January, 1866." —Leslie, 1896

General David Hunter

"General Hunter, born in Washington, D. C., July 21st, 1802, died there, February 2nd, 1886, was graduated…