Turner painted this picture displaying his incredible techniques with watercolors. It can now be found in the National Gallery.

Ivy Bridge

Turner painted this picture displaying his incredible techniques with watercolors. It can now be found…

"The Bastille, after its capture in 1789, was leveled to the ground, and its stones were used to build one of the bridges over the Seine. The site of the fortress-prison is now a public square. In the center rises the July Column (154 feet high), commemorating the revolutionists of 1830."—Webster, 1920

Colonne Juillet

"The Bastille, after its capture in 1789, was leveled to the ground, and its stones were used to build…

"View at King's Bridge. This view is from the southwest side of the stream, from near the tide-mill. The house beyond, shaded by willows, is the residence of the widow of the late Robert McComb."—Lossing, 1851

King's Bridge

"View at King's Bridge. This view is from the southwest side of the stream, from near the tide-mill.…

The King's Bridge, erected in 1693 by Frederick Philipse a local Lord loyal to the British Monarch. It is located in the northwest Bronx, New York.

King's Bridge in 1860

The King's Bridge, erected in 1693 by Frederick Philipse a local Lord loyal to the British Monarch.…

A ladder is an inclined set of steps, hinged in the middle to form an inverted V, with stays to keep the two havles at a fixed angle.

Folding Step Ladder

A ladder is an inclined set of steps, hinged in the middle to form an inverted V, with stays to keep…

Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek has carved a gorge of the limestone forming an arch 215 ft high with a span of 90 ft.

The Natural Bridge in Virginia

Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek has carved…

The chevet of Notre Dame viewed from the shore line.

Chevet of Notre Dame

The chevet of Notre Dame viewed from the shore line.

An view of Lafayette Park in St. Louis, Missouri. A woman walking across a small wooden bridge over a stream.

Lafayette Park

An view of Lafayette Park in St. Louis, Missouri. A woman walking across a small wooden bridge over…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Aelius

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Ariminum

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Cestius

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Trajan

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"The Pont-y-ru-Prydd goes over the River Taff near Newbridge. The arch measures 140 feet between the abutments, and has a rise or versed sine of 35 feet. The width of the soffit is 15 feet 10 inches at the springing, diminishing to 14 feet 5 inches at the crown by six offsers." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Pont-y-tu-Prydd

"The Pont-y-ru-Prydd goes over the River Taff near Newbridge. The arch measures 140 feet between the…

"The beautiful "Ponte della Trinita," erected at Florance in 1566 from the designs of Ammanati." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Ponte della Trinita

"The beautiful "Ponte della Trinita," erected at Florance in 1566 from the designs of Ammanati." —…

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the Confederate General Jackson and his army." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Pontoon bridge

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the…

"Rebuilding of the railroad bridge over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, burnt by the Confederates in their retreat from Falmouth, April 19th, 1862. On April 17th, 1862, General McDowell, with his division of the Federal army, arrived on the banks of the Rappahannock, the Confederates retreating and burning the bridge which connected Falmouth with Fredericksburg. The city capitulated the next day. Our artist wrote, "I send you a sketch of the rebuilding of the railroad bridge across the Rappahannock. The rapidity with which our Northern men rebuilt the burnt bridge, and the strength and excellence of the work, caused the astonishment of the inhabitants of the city. The supports are made of pine logs cut from the adjacent forest, and the time occupied in putting the structure over was about six days."" —Leslie, 1896

Rappahannock bridge

"Rebuilding of the railroad bridge over the Rappahannock to Fredericksburg, burnt by the Confederates…

A man ships Remington rifles by boat, handing them off to a man on a bridge.

Shipping Remington Rifles

A man ships Remington rifles by boat, handing them off to a man on a bridge.

Reynard the Fox and his nephew, Grimbard the badger, walk to court together. Reynard is tempted by the ducks and geese nearby.

Reynard the Fox: Walking with Grimbard

Reynard the Fox and his nephew, Grimbard the badger, walk to court together. Reynard is tempted by the…

"View at Rugeley's. This view is from the south side of the bridge. The counterfeit cannon was placed in the road where the first wagon is seen. The house and barn of Rugeley were in the cleared field seen beyond the wagons."—Lossing, 1851

Rugeley's

"View at Rugeley's. This view is from the south side of the bridge. The counterfeit cannon was placed…

This illustration shows a bridge leading in to the town of Saragossa, Spain. Saragossa is a city famous for holding invaders during numerous wars.

Saragossa

This illustration shows a bridge leading in to the town of Saragossa, Spain. Saragossa is a city famous…

Union forces crossing a river.

Sherman's March to the Sea

Union forces crossing a river.

The bridge accross the Mississippi at St. Louis.

St. Louis Bridge

The bridge accross the Mississippi at St. Louis.

The suspension bridge connecting New York with Brooklyn.

Suspension Bridge

The suspension bridge connecting New York with Brooklyn.

Crumlin Viaduct, South Wales.

Crumlin Viaduct

Crumlin Viaduct, South Wales.

" In Rockbridge County, Virginia, is to be found one of the greatest curiosities in the United States, a natural bridge. This bridge consists of a stupendous arch of limestone rock, over a chasm fifty feet wide dat its base and ninety feet at the top."- Lupton

Natural Bridge in Virginia

" In Rockbridge County, Virginia, is to be found one of the greatest curiosities in the United States,…

"a, a, a, represents the water-level of a pond or reservoir upon elevated ground. From this pond a line or pipe is laid, passing over a bridge or viaduct at d, and under a river at c. The fountains, at b, b, show the stream rising to its level in the pond, a, at two points of very different elevation." — Wells, 1857

Water Level

"a, a, a, represents the water-level of a pond or reservoir upon elevated ground. From this pond a line…

"The Wheatstone bridge is used as a way to measure resistance of a unknown resitors." -Avery 1895

Wheatstone Bridge

"The Wheatstone bridge is used as a way to measure resistance of a unknown resitors." -Avery 1895

"The Wheatstone bridge is used as a way to measure resistance of a unknown resitors." -Avery 1895

Wheatstone Bridge in Circuit

"The Wheatstone bridge is used as a way to measure resistance of a unknown resitors." -Avery 1895

"The Wheatstone bridge is used as a way to measure resistance of a unknown resitors." -Avery 1895

Wheatstone Bridge with Resistors

"The Wheatstone bridge is used as a way to measure resistance of a unknown resitors." -Avery 1895

"The best method for comparing resistances with great accuracy is the modification of Wheatstone's bridge introduced by Kirchhoff. KL is a platinum-iridium wire, DK and HL are stout copper terminals to which it is soldered, DAE, EGH, FBS are stout copper pieces with binding screws and terminals for mercury cups, by means of which resistances R, T, U, S can be inserted at D, E, F, H. A, B, and G are binding screws for the battery wires and one end of the galvanometer wire." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Wheatstones Bridge

"The best method for comparing resistances with great accuracy is the modification of Wheatstone's bridge…