"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

(1836-1911) English parodist that teamed up with Sir Arthur Sullivan to write 14 operas.

Sir William S. Gilbert

(1836-1911) English parodist that teamed up with Sir Arthur Sullivan to write 14 operas.

(1809-1898) British Statesman and prime minister.

William E. Gladstone

(1809-1898) British Statesman and prime minister.

(1850-1924) British labor leader who became a major figure in the American labor movement.

Samuel Gompers

(1850-1924) British labor leader who became a major figure in the American labor movement.

"Gorkha deoasea coinage; rubbing from coin in British Museum." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Gorkha Coin

"Gorkha deoasea coinage; rubbing from coin in British Museum." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

British soldier, 1901

Great Britain: soldier 1901

British soldier, 1901

(1840-1928) British novelist who wrote the <I>Maddening Crowd</I> and<I> Tess</I>

Thomas Hardy

(1840-1928) British novelist who wrote the Maddening Crowd and Tess

(1578-1657) English physician who published his treatise on the circulatory system in 1628.

William Harvey

(1578-1657) English physician who published his treatise on the circulatory system in 1628.

Queen Henrietta Maria was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland through her marriage to Charles I. The U.S. state of Maryland was so named in her honor by Caecilius Calvert, son of George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore. Cape Henrietta Maria, at the western meeting of James Bay and Hudson Bay in Northern Ontario, is also named for her.

Queen Henrietta Maria

Queen Henrietta Maria was Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland through her marriage to Charles…

Henry III is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. He was also the first child monarch in English royal history.

Henry III of Winchester

Henry III is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. He…

Henry VIII was married six times during his life. First, to Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymor, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

Henry the VIII and His Wives

Henry VIII was married six times during his life. First, to Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymor,…

Known greatly as the king of hearts, or the man of ruthless wonder, Henry was born in Pembroke Castle, Wales, in 1457, Henry VII was the only son of Edmund Tudor and Margaret Beaufort.

Henry VII

Known greatly as the king of hearts, or the man of ruthless wonder, Henry was born in Pembroke Castle,…

Henry VIII and all of his men coming into the city

Henry VIII

Henry VIII and all of his men coming into the city

(1726-1799) British admiral that defended the American coast against the French.

Lord Howe

(1726-1799) British admiral that defended the American coast against the French.

Impressment of American sailors by the English.

Impressment

Impressment of American sailors by the English.

(1838-1905) The greatest English actor of his time. The first actor to receive knighthood.

Sir Henry Irving

(1838-1905) The greatest English actor of his time. The first actor to receive knighthood.

"Pieta, about 14th century. British museum." &mdash; The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Ivory Carving

"Pieta, about 14th century. British museum." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

During the War of 1812, when British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses, including militia from several western states and territories.

Jackson's Headquarters, New Orleans

During the War of 1812, when British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses,…

One of the prisons used by the British at New York during the American Revolutionary War.

The Jersey Prison Ship

One of the prisons used by the British at New York during the American Revolutionary War.

All this time John Lacklands cruelty and savageness were making the whole kingdom miserable; and at last the great barons bear it no longer. They met together and agreed that they would make John swear to govern by the good old English laws that had prevailed before the Normans came. The difficulty was to be sure of what these laws were, for most of the copies of them had been lost. However, Archbishop Langton and some of the wisest of the barons put together a set of laws-some copied, some recollected, some old, some new-but all such as to give the barons some control of the king, and hinder him from getting savage soldiers together to frighten people into doing whatever he chose to make them. These laws they called Magna Charta, or the great charter; and they all came in armor, and took John by surprise at Windsor. He came to meet them in a meadow named Runnymede, on the bank of the Thames, and there they force him to sign the charter, for which all Englishmen are grateful to them.

John's Anger after Signing Magna Charta

All this time John Lacklands cruelty and savageness were making the whole kingdom miserable; and at…

The sinking of the Alabama by the Union Kearsarge. Some Confederates aboard the Alabama escaped to England aboard the nearby British yacht Deerhound.

Kearsarge Sinking the Alabama

The sinking of the Alabama by the Union Kearsarge. Some Confederates aboard the Alabama escaped to England…

King Henry was a builder of beautiful churches. Westminster Abby, as it is now, was one. And he was charitable to the poor that, when he had his children weighed, he gave their weight in gold and silver in alms. But he gave to everyone who asked, and so always wanted money; and sometimes his men could get nothing for the king and queen to eat, but by going and taking sheep and poultry from the poor farmers around; so that things were nearly as bad as under William Rufus-because the king was so foolishly good-natured. The Pope was always sending for money, too; and the king tried to raise it in ways that, according to Magna Carta, he had sworn not to do. His foreign friends told him that if he minded Magna Carta he would be a poor creature-not like a king who might do all he pleased; and whenever he listened to them he broke the laws of Magna Carta. Then, when his barons complained and frightened him, he swore again to keep them; so that nobody could trust him, and his weakness was almost as bad for the kingdom as John's wickedness. When they could bear it no longer, the barons all met him at the council, which was called the Parliament, from a French word meaning talk. This time they came in armor, binging all their fighting men, and declared that he had broken his word so often that they should appoint some of their own number to watch him, and hinder his doing anything against the laws he had sworn to observe, or from getting money from the people without their consent.

King Henry and his Barons

King Henry was a builder of beautiful churches. Westminster Abby, as it is now, was one. And he was…

"Head of British Lizard. Laceria agilis." &mdash;The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Laceria Agilis

"Head of British Lizard. Laceria agilis." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Head of British Lizard. Laceria viridis." &mdash;The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Laceria Viridis

"Head of British Lizard. Laceria viridis." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Head of British Lizard. Laceria vivipara." &mdash;The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Laceria Vivipara

"Head of British Lizard. Laceria vivipara." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

British merchant and yachtsman

Sir Thomas Lipton

British merchant and yachtsman

The surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

Lord Cornwallis

The surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

Two women dressed as men arresting a pair of British officers.

Grace and Rachel Martin Capturing Two British Officers

Two women dressed as men arresting a pair of British officers.

Mary, the fourth and penultimate monarch of the Tudor dynasty, is remembered for returning England from Protestantism to Roman Catholicism. To this end, she had almost three hundred religious dissenters executed; as a consequence, she is often known as Bloody Mary. Her religious policies, however, were in many cases reversed by her successor and half-sister, Elizabeth I. Mary Tudor was a cousin, once removed, of Mary, Queen of Scots, with whom she is often confused by those unfamiliar with British history.

Mary I

Mary, the fourth and penultimate monarch of the Tudor dynasty, is remembered for returning England from…

Although the Stewart family had gained the Scottish throne Marjory, Mary, Queen of Scots became Queen only because all male alternatives had been exhausted.

Mary Queen of Scots

Although the Stewart family had gained the Scottish throne Marjory, Mary, Queen of Scots became Queen…

The seal of colonial Maryland, a British colony in 1632.

Seal of Maryland

The seal of colonial Maryland, a British colony in 1632.

As a kind of joke, John, King Henry's youngest son, had been called Lackland, because he had nothing when his brothers each had some great dukedom. The name suited him only too well before the end of his life. The English made him king at once. Richard had never had any children, but his brother Geoffery, who was older than John had left a son named Arthur, who was about twelve years old, and who rightly the Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou. King Philip, who was always glad to vex whoever was king of England, took Arthur under his protection, and promised to get Normandy out of John's hands. However, John had a meeting with him and persuaded him to desert Arthur, and marry his son Louis to John's own niece, Blanche, who had a chance of being queen of part of Spain. Still Arthur lived at the French King's court, and when he was sixteen years old, Philip helped him to raise an army and go to try his fortune against his uncle. He laid siege to Mirabeau, a town where his grandmother, Queen Eleanor, was living. John, who was then in Normandy, hurried to her rescue, beat Arthur's army, made him prisoner and carried him off, first to Romen, and then to the strong castle of Falaise. Nobody quite knows what was done to him there. The governor, Hubert de Burgh, once found him fighting hard, though with no weapon but a stool, to defend himself from some ruffians who had been sent to put out his eyes. Hubert saved him from these men, but shortly after this good man was sent elsewhere by the king, and John came himself to Falaise. Arthur was never seen alive again, and it is believed that John took him out in a boat in the river at night, stabbed him with his own hand, and threw his body in the river.

Murder of Prince Arthur

As a kind of joke, John, King Henry's youngest son, had been called Lackland, because he had nothing…

A British flag officer who is well known for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar.

Horatio Nelson

A British flag officer who is well known for his victory in the Battle of Trafalgar.

"Miss Florence Nightingale did remarkable work during the Crimean War for the relief of sick and wounded British soldiers. To her self-sacrificing labors are also due many improvements in hospital management, sanitation, and the training of nurses."&mdash;Webster, 1920

Florence Nightingale

"Miss Florence Nightingale did remarkable work during the Crimean War for the relief of sick and wounded…

(--) Head of English state

Frederic, Lord North, Earl of Guilford

(--) Head of English state

James Oglethorpe (1/2/22/1696 - 6/30/1785) was a British general, a philanthropist and was the founder of the colony of Georgia. A social reformer in England, he hoped to resettle England's poor, especially those in debtors prison, in the New World. Oglethorpe sailed for 88 days, arriving in Charleston, South Carolina on the ship Anne, in late 1732, and settled near the present site of Savannah, Georgia on February 12, 1733.

General James Oglethorpe

James Oglethorpe (1/2/22/1696 - 6/30/1785) was a British general, a philanthropist and was the founder…

This decorative panel is a British design. In the center is a figure of Queen Eleanor, and the background is a gold leaf design.

Decorative Panel

This decorative panel is a British design. In the center is a figure of Queen Eleanor, and the background…

Philip sought an alliance with the Kingdom of England, marrying the Catholic Queen Mary I of England in 1554. On occasion of the marriage, he was created King of Chile by his father and received the Kingdom of Naples and the title of a King of Jerusalem, which came with it, from him. Under the terms of the marriage, Philip became King Consort, during the lifetime of his spouse. The marriage was unpopular with her subjects and was a purely political alliance as far as Philip was concerned. On January 16, 1556, Philip succeeded to the throne of Spain, as a result of his father's abdication, but he did not choose to reside i the country until his father's death two years later. After Mary died childless in 1558, Philip showed an interest in marrying her Protestant younger half-sister, Queen Elizabeth I of England, but this plan fell through for a number of reasons.

Philip II

Philip sought an alliance with the Kingdom of England, marrying the Catholic Queen Mary I of England…

The smallest Anglo&ndash;Indian copper coin, equal to one third of a pice. About one fourth of a United States cent.

Pie

The smallest Anglo–Indian copper coin, equal to one third of a pice. About one fourth of a United…

The smallest Anglo&mdashIndian copper coin, equal to one third of a pice. About one fourth of a United States cent.

Pie

The smallest Anglo&mdashIndian copper coin, equal to one third of a pice. About one fourth of a United…

The curtain pin is a British design in a floral style.

Curtain Pin

The curtain pin is a British design in a floral style.

(1708-1778) Also known as Pitt the Elder. He was an English statesman who formed a new ministry in 1766.

William Pitt, Earl of Chatham

(1708-1778) Also known as Pitt the Elder. He was an English statesman who formed a new ministry in 1766.

A British politician during the late 18th century.

William Pitt

A British politician during the late 18th century.

This cornice pole-end is a British design. It has a floral design that is made out of blue-bells.

Cornice Pole-End

This cornice pole-end is a British design. It has a floral design that is made out of blue-bells.

This cornice pole-end is a British design in a floral style. It has a figure and bunches of hops in the design.

Cornice Pole-End

This cornice pole-end is a British design in a floral style. It has a figure and bunches of hops in…

Raleigh's plan for colonization in Virginia in North America ended in failure at Roanoke Island, but paved the way for subsequent colonies.

Sir Walter Raleigh

Raleigh's plan for colonization in Virginia in North America ended in failure at Roanoke Island, but…

Two British Soldiers in full uniform ready for battle.

Bristish Soldiers of the Revolution

Two British Soldiers in full uniform ready for battle.

During one of King Richard the Lion-Heart's crusades the city of Acre was taken over and a prince, Leopold, Duke of Austria, set up his banner on the walls. Richard did not think it ought to be there: he pulled it up and threw it down into the ditch, asking the duke how he durst take the honors of a king.

Richard Removing the Archduke's Banner

During one of King Richard the Lion-Heart's crusades the city of Acre was taken over and a prince, Leopold,…

(1724-1803) British publisher that emigrated in 1760 to Philadelphia that founded the New York Gazette. After the American Revolution his paper failed.

James Rivington

(1724-1803) British publisher that emigrated in 1760 to Philadelphia that founded the New York Gazette.…

Robert's encounter with his father, William the Great, during battle.

Robert

Robert's encounter with his father, William the Great, during battle.

He is sometimes called the Red King, but more commonly William Rufus. Things went worse than ever with the poor English in his time; for at least William the Conqueror had made everybody mind the law, but now William Rufus let his cruel soldiers do just as they pleased, and spoil what they did not want.

William Rufus II

He is sometimes called the Red King, but more commonly William Rufus. Things went worse than ever with…

The Sayre House in Southampton, New York which was occupied by the British during the Revolutionary War.

The Sayre House

The Sayre House in Southampton, New York which was occupied by the British during the Revolutionary…

A script wrapped in a floral vine

Script footer

A script wrapped in a floral vine

"Sea lavender (<em>statice limonium</em>) is a native British plant, being fairly common in certain parts of the coast."&mdash;Finley, 1917

Sea lavender

"Sea lavender (statice limonium) is a native British plant, being fairly common in certain…

The Second Anglo-Afghan War started after Russia and Britain ended with the June 1878 Congress of Berlin. Sher Ali refused a British mission. This is a scene of action in the Chardeh Valley, December 11, 1879.

Second Anglo-Afghan War

The Second Anglo-Afghan War started after Russia and Britain ended with the June 1878 Congress of Berlin.…

Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (baptised April 29, 1764 &ndash; February 14, 1830) was a British soldier and colonial administrator.

Sir John Coape Sherbrooke

Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (baptised April 29, 1764 – February 14, 1830) was a British soldier…