"A cistern barometer, being that generally seen in weather-glasses or ordinary barometers. The tube is bent at the bottom, and the cistern is merely an expansion of the lower end. Very generally, the cistern is hidden from view, and protected from injury by a wooden cover in front." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Barometer

"A cistern barometer, being that generally seen in weather-glasses or ordinary barometers. The tube…

During the War of 1812, James Biddle was first lieutenant in USS Wasp. He led the boarding party against the HMS Frolic. He sprang into the rigging and with his own hand struck the colors of the Frolic. The legislature of Pennsylvania voted Lieutenant Biddle thanks and a sword, and the leading men of Philadelphia gave him a silver urn.

The Biddle Urn

During the War of 1812, James Biddle was first lieutenant in USS Wasp. He led the boarding party against…

"The chain-pump consists of a tube or cylinder, the lower part of which is immersed in a well or reservoir, and the upper part enters the bottom of a cistern into which the water is to be raised. A chain is carried round a wheel at the top, and is furnished at equal distances with movable bottoms, which fit water-tight in the tube. As the wheel revolves, they successively enter the tube, and carry the water up before them, which is discharged into the cistern at the top of the tube." — Wells, 1857

Chain-Pump

"The chain-pump consists of a tube or cylinder, the lower part of which is immersed in a well or reservoir,…

A siphon discharge cistern is provided in which the cistern can be discharged either partially or fully with the necessity of the operator waiting until the flushing action is completed.

Water Closet Cistern

A siphon discharge cistern is provided in which the cistern can be discharged either partially or fully…

"Suppose the cistern a to be capable of holding one hundred gallons, and into its bottom there be fitted the tube b, bent, as seen in the figure, and capable of containing one gallon. The top of the cistern, and that of the tube, being open, pour water into the tube at c, and it will rise up through the perpendicular bend into the cistern, and if the process be continued, the cistern will be filled by pouring water into the tube. Now it is plain, that the gallon of water in the tube presses against the hundred gallons in the cistern, with a force equal to the pressure of the hundred gallons, otherwise, that in the tube would be forced upwards higher than that in the cistern, whereas, we find that the surfaces of both stand exactly at the same height." —Comstock, 1850

Water Pressure

"Suppose the cistern a to be capable of holding one hundred gallons, and into its bottom there be fitted…