"Thomas Francis Bayard was born in Wilmington, Del., October 29, 1828." —The Popular Cyclopedia, 1888

Thomas F. Bayard

"Thomas Francis Bayard was born in Wilmington, Del., October 29, 1828." —The Popular Cyclopedia,…

The United States Capitol serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. It is located in Washington, D.C., on top of Capitol Hill at the eastern end of the National Mall. Although not in the geographic center of the District of Columbia, the Capitol is the origin by which the quadrants of the district are divided. Officially, both the east and west sides of the Capitol are referred to as "fronts." Historically, however, the east front was initially the side of the building intended for the arrival of visitors and dignitaries.

Capitol Building

The United States Capitol serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative…

Carpenter's Hall, where the First Congress met

Carpenter's Hall

Carpenter's Hall, where the First Congress met

The opening of Congress for debate.

Congress Opening for Debate

The opening of Congress for debate.

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers <em>Merrimac, Yorktown</em>, and <em>Jamestown</em>, and the Federal wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>- sinking of the <em>Cumberland</em> by a blow from the <em>Merrimac</em>, March 8th, 1862- sketched by our special artist. About noon on the 8th, a suspicious-looking vessel, looking like a submerged house, with the roof only above water, was discovered, moving down from Norfolk, by the channel in front of Sewall's Point batteries. There was nothing protruding above the water but a flagstaff flying the Confederate flag and a short smokestack. She moved along slowly, and turned into the channel leading to Newport News, and steamed direct for the wooden sailing frigates <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which were lying at the mouth of James River. As soon as she came within range of the <em>Cumberland</em>, the latter opened on her with her heavy guns; but the balls struck and glanced off without effect. In the meantime, as the <em>Merrimac</em> was approaching the two frigates on one side, the Confederate ironclad steamers <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em> came down James River, and engaged the frigates on the other side. The batteries at Newport News also opened on the <em>Yorktown</em> and <em>Jamestown</em>, and did all in their power to assist the <em>Cumberland</em> and <em>Congress</em>, which, being sailing vessels, were at the mercy of the approaching steamers. The <em>Merrimac</em>, in the meantime, kept steadily on her course, and slowly approached the <em>Cumberland</em>, when she and the <em>Congress</em>, at a distance of one hundred yards, rained full broadsides on the ironclad monters without effect. After receiving the first broadside of the two frigates, she ran on to the <em>Cumberland</em>, striking her about midship, and literally laying open her bow, left her to sink, while she engaged the <em>Congress</em>, which lay about a quarter of a mile distant. The <em>Congress</em>, having no regular crew on board of her, and seeing the hopelessness of resisting the ironclad steamer, at once struck her colors." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

First naval battle

"First naval battle in Hampton Roads between the Confederate iron-plated steamers Merrimac, Yorktown,…

Capital letter G with the location of the first Congress meeting.

G, Capital

Capital letter G with the location of the first Congress meeting.

U.S. House of Representatives member.

Frank Hiscock

U.S. House of Representatives member.

In February 1800 <em>Constellation</em> fought a night encounter with the frigate <em>La Vengeance</em>. <em>Constellation</em> was victorious after a five-hour battle. The medal awarded in commemoration of that battle.

Medal Awarded by Congress in Commemoration of the Capture of La Vengeance by the Constellation

In February 1800 Constellation fought a night encounter with the frigate La Vengeance.…

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to Commodore Jacob Jones. an officer in the United States Navy during the Quasi-War with France, the War of 1812 and the Barbary Wars.

Gold Medal Awarded to Jacob Jones

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to Commodore Jacob Jones. an officer in the United States Navy…

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to John Paul Jones, America's first well-known naval fighter in the American Revolutionary War.

Gold Medal Awarded to John Paul Jones (Back)

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to John Paul Jones, America's first well-known naval fighter in…

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to John Paul Jones, America's first well-known naval fighter in the American Revolutionary War.

Medal Awarded to John Paul Jones (Front)

The Congressional Gold Medal awarded to John Paul Jones, America's first well-known naval fighter in…

The medal given to General Morgan by Congress.

Colonial Medal

The medal given to General Morgan by Congress.

Samuel Morse explaining his telegraph to members of Congress.

Samuel Morse

Samuel Morse explaining his telegraph to members of Congress.

"But who are the little boys with the silver badges about the size of a half-dollar on their coats, who are running to and fro with letters and papers in their hands? They do not seem to be more than twelve or fifteen years of age. Those are the pages of Congress; they run errands for the congressman; and each receives two dollars and fifty cents a day for his work."&mdash;Carpenter, 1898.

A Page

"But who are the little boys with the silver badges about the size of a half-dollar on their coats,…

A view of Congress passing the amendment to the constitution prohibiting slavery.

Passage of the Amendment to the Constitution Prohibiting Slavery

A view of Congress passing the amendment to the constitution prohibiting slavery.

(1839-1902) American politician and Congressman

Thomas B. Reed

(1839-1902) American politician and Congressman

"It is a gorgeous structure decorated with statues, carvings, and gold leaf, situated close by the Thiergarten." &mdash;Carpenter, 1902

Reichstag

"It is a gorgeous structure decorated with statues, carvings, and gold leaf, situated close by the Thiergarten."…

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played a significant part in the early history of the United States.

Room in which Congress met in Carpenters' Hall

Carpenters' Hall is a four-story brick building in Center City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania which played…

(1825- ) American general and Congressman

General Sickles

(1825- ) American general and Congressman

(1793- ) American lawyer and Congressman

John Slidell

(1793- ) American lawyer and Congressman

This illustration shows a presentation to the United States Senate.

United States Senate

This illustration shows a presentation to the United States Senate.

US Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

US Capitol Building

US Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

Benjamin Franklin "Bluff" Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States Senator from Ohio. In the Senate, he was associated with the Radical Republicans of that time. Wade, along with other politicians, witnessed the defeat of the Union Army at the First Battle of Bull Run. There, he was almost captured by the Confederate Army. Wade, along with most other Radical Republicans, was highly critical of President Andrew Johnson (who became President after Lincoln's assassination).

Benjamin Franklin Wade

Benjamin Franklin "Bluff" Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States…

J. B. Weaver of the Greenback Party is ignored by Speaker Randall and the Congress.

Weaver and Greenbacks Ignored

J. B. Weaver of the Greenback Party is ignored by Speaker Randall and the Congress.

Greenback the Weaver in delight at being recognized by Speaker Randall and Congress.

Weaver and Greenbacks Recognized

Greenback the Weaver in delight at being recognized by Speaker Randall and Congress.