The Seal of the Council of New England.

Council of New England

The Seal of the Council of New England.

This album cover was designed in London, England. It is a small quarto (bookbinding technique), richly designed in gold and other colors on brown leather. The interior is made out of white vellum (mammal skin).

Album Cover

This album cover was designed in London, England. It is a small quarto (bookbinding technique), richly…

This table cover shows the royal arms of England in the center. It is used to go over a table for decorative purposes.

Table Cover

This table cover shows the royal arms of England in the center. It is used to go over a table for decorative…

Archbishop Cranmer

Archbishop Cranmer

Archbishop Cranmer

Thomas Cranmer (2 July 1489 – 21 March 1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI. He helped build a favourable case for Henry's divorce from Catherine of Aragon which resulted in the separation of the English Church from union with the Holy See. Along with Thomas Cromwell, he supported the principle of royal supremacy in which the king was considered sovereign over the Church within his realm.

Thomas Cranmer

Thomas Cranmer (2 July 1489 – 21 March 1556) was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop…

Crocket, as seen in Exeter Cathedral in England.

Crocket

Crocket, as seen in Exeter Cathedral in England.

"Cromwell was made Lord Protector of the Realm in 1653, of England."—Colby, 1899

Cromwell

"Cromwell was made Lord Protector of the Realm in 1653, of England."—Colby, 1899

Stuntney is about a mile and a half outside the cathedral city of Ely. Oliver Cromwell lived here for several years after inheriting the position of local tax collector in 1636. His former home dates to the 16th century and is now used by the Tourist Information Office as well as being a museum with rooms displayed as they would have been in Cromwell's time.

The Cromwell House at Stuntney

Stuntney is about a mile and a half outside the cathedral city of Ely. Oliver Cromwell lived here for…

(1599-1658) English general and politician

Oliver Cromwell

(1599-1658) English general and politician

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 Old Style– 3 September 1658 Old Style) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was one of the commanders of the New Model Army which defeated the royalists in the English Civil War. After the execution of King Charles I in 1649, Cromwell dominated the short-lived Commonwealth of England, conquered Ireland and Scotland, and ruled as Lord Protector from 1653 until his death in 1658.

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 Old Style– 3 September 1658 Old Style) was an English military…

Worn by British Royalty.

Crown, British

Worn by British Royalty.

The state crown of Her Majesty the Queen.

State Crown

The state crown of Her Majesty the Queen.

"Richard I (looking down on the Holy City): 'My dream comes true.' A cartoon which appeared in Punch, Dec. 19, 1917, at the time of the British capture of Jerusalem."—Webster, 1920

The Last Crusade

"Richard I (looking down on the Holy City): 'My dream comes true.' A cartoon which appeared in Punch,…

"But perhaps the most effective and suitable employment of iron is shown in connection with glass, as has been exemplified in the temporary buildings for exhibitions, for which the Great Exhibition in London, in the year 1851, furnished the model which has so often been followed subsequently. This building was afterwards removed to Sydenham, and is now known as the Crystal Palace. In this structure the walls as well as the vaulted roof consist of glass inserted between iron girders, after the pattern of large conservatories and winter-gardens, especially of that in the Champs Élydées at Paris, which is no longer in existence. Although this building scarcely seems like an architectural construction, but appears to form a peculiar specialty, still an impression is produced, which is hitherto unparalleled by its transparent termination in all directions, and by its dimensions, which have never been before attained in enclosed spaces. The distinguishing height of the main body of the building, which is divided into several naves and galleries , and if the loftier transept, which is 174 English feet high, is too considerable to recall the conservatory, which first suggested the idea to Paxton of constructing such a building on a large scale for the Great Exhibition. The visible stability of the system of construction gives a certain feeling of security as a counterpoise to the astonishment which the enormous size creates. On the other hand it is not to be denied that artistic execution in the forms of the constructive parts is wanting, though many difficulties would perhaps have had to be overcome to attain this without the structure suffering as regards solidity. These constructive elements, moreover, are not used as leading to further æsthetic development, so that a real artistic value can only be attributed to the novel impression of the whole, which is produced by the large dimensions and transparent walls."

Crystal Palace at Sydenham

"But perhaps the most effective and suitable employment of iron is shown in connection with glass, as…

An illustration of a "silver Medal-cup (The medals are all of the Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel.)" -Century, 1886

Medal Cup

An illustration of a "silver Medal-cup (The medals are all of the Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel.)"…

HM Prison Dartmoor is located in Princetown, high on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. Its high granite walls dominate this area of the moor.

Dartmoor Prison

HM Prison Dartmoor is located in Princetown, high on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. Its high…

Wat Tyler, while talking to the King, grew violent, forgot to whom he was speaking, and laid his hand on the king's bridle, as if to threaten or take him prisoner. Upon this, the Lord Mayor, with his mace-dealt the man such a blow that he fell from his horse, and an attendant thrust him through with a sword.

Death of Wat Tyler

Wat Tyler, while talking to the King, grew violent, forgot to whom he was speaking, and laid his hand…

A seal representing the city of Derby, England.

Derby

A seal representing the city of Derby, England.

"DIADEM, a circle of gold with points rising from it, worn by ancient kings as the token of royalty. The diadem of most of the monarchs of Europe, as represented in ancient statuary, stained glass, and paintings, resembles the annexed engraving; the kings of England, from the Conquest to Henry VII., all wore a diadem of this shape." -Hall, 1862

Diadem

"DIADEM, a circle of gold with points rising from it, worn by ancient kings as the token of royalty.…

(1812-1870) English novelist

Charles Dickens

(1812-1870) English novelist

England's first and only Jewish Prime Minister

Disraeli

England's first and only Jewish Prime Minister

(1804-1881) British Statesman and Prime Minister who wrote the novels <I>Vivian Grey</I><I> Coningsby</I> and <I>Sybil</I>

Benjamin Disraeli

(1804-1881) British Statesman and Prime Minister who wrote the novels Vivian Grey Coningsby and Sybil

"The Clumber spaniel, so called from the breed having originated at Clumber, in Nottinghamshire, a seat of the Duke of Newcastle."—Finley, 1917

Clumber Spaniel

"The Clumber spaniel, so called from the breed having originated at Clumber, in Nottinghamshire, a seat…

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the Conqueror.

Domesday Book

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the…

Doublets from varying eras.

Doublet

Doublets from varying eras.

Sir Francis Drake

Sir Francis Drake

Sir Francis Drake

This is a pen drawing by artist Edmund New. It seems to illustrate people walking across a bridge in Evesham, England.

Pen Drawing

This is a pen drawing by artist Edmund New. It seems to illustrate people walking across a bridge in…

This is a pen drawing by artist Edmund New. It seems to illustrate people walking across a bridge in Evesham, England.

Pen Drawing

This is a pen drawing by artist Edmund New. It seems to illustrate people walking across a bridge in…

Druid sacrifice

Druid sacrifice

Druid sacrifice

Druids

Druids

Druids

"The Druidical system was at the height of at the time of the Roman invasion uner Julius Caesar. Against the Druids, as their chief enemies, these conquerors of the world directed their unsparing fury. The Druids, harassed at all points on the mainland, retreated to Anglesey and ona, where for a season they found shelter and continued their now dishonoured rites." &mdash;Bulfinch, 1897

Druids

"The Druidical system was at the height of at the time of the Roman invasion uner Julius Caesar. Against…

English writer

John Dryden

English writer

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which common scolds were formerly tied and plunged into water." -Whitney, 1911

Ducking Stool

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which…

Early English Style, Detached shafts in Lady Chapel, Salisbury Catherdral

Early English Style (Salisbury Cathedral)

Early English Style, Detached shafts in Lady Chapel, Salisbury Catherdral

This easel was made in England for use of both oil and water color painting. It has attached compartments that can be closed into the easel.

Easel

This easel was made in England for use of both oil and water color painting. It has attached compartments…

East India House in Leadenhall Street in the City of London in England was the headquarters of the British East India Company. It was rebuilt by the architect Richard Jupp in 1799&ndash;1800. Much of India was governed from here until the British government took control of the Company's possessions in India on November 1, 1858. The building was home to the famous ceiling painting, 'The East Offering Its Riches To Britannia', painted by the Italian artist Spiridione Roma in 1778.

The Old East India House

East India House in Leadenhall Street in the City of London in England was the headquarters of the British…

King Edgar was king of England.

King Edgar

King Edgar was king of England.

Edward I of England.

Edward I

Edward I of England.

Edward I (17 June 1239 &ndash; 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks, achieved historical fame as the monarch who conquered large parts of Wales and almost succeeded in doing the same to Scotland. However, his death led to his son Edward II taking the throne and ultimately failing in his attempt to subjugate Scotland. Longshanks reigned from 1272 to 1307, ascending the throne of England on 20 November 1272 after the death of his father, King Henry III. His mother was queen consort Eleanor of Provence.

Edward I (Longshanks)

Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks, achieved historical fame…

The heraldic shield of King Edward I of England, reigning from 1272 to 1307.

Shield of Edward I

The heraldic shield of King Edward I of England, reigning from 1272 to 1307.

Edward II of England

Edward II

Edward II of England

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 &ndash; September 21, 1327) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. His tendency to ignore his nobility in favour of low-born favourites led to constant political unrest and his eventual deposition. Edward is perhaps best remembered for his supposed murder and his alleged homosexuality as well as being the first monarch to establish colleges in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge; he founded Cambridge's King's Hall in 1317 and gave Oxford's Oriel College its royal charter in 1326. Both colleges received the favour of Edward's son, Edward III, who confirmed Oriel's charter in 1327 and refounded King's Hall in 1337

Edward II of England

Edward II, (April 25, 1284 – September 21, 1327) of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307…

Edward II repulsed from Stirling castle by De Mowdray.

Edward II repulsed from Stirling castle by De Mowdray.

Edward II repulsed from Stirling castle by De Mowdray.

King of England

Edward III

King of England

Image taken from the tomb of the English king.

Edward III

Image taken from the tomb of the English king.

Edward III of England.

Edward III

Edward III of England.

Edward III was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. His fifty-year reign began when his father, Edward II of England killed. Edwards reign was marked by an expansion of English territory through wars in Scotland and France. Edward's parentage and his prodigious offspring provided the basis for two lengthy and significant events in European and British history, the Hundred Years' War and the Wars of the Roses, respectively.

Edward III

Edward III was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. His fifty-year reign began…

The heraldic shield of King Edward III of England.

Shield of Edward III

The heraldic shield of King Edward III of England.

"Coin of Edward IV." &mdash; Lardner, 1885

Coin of Edward IV

"Coin of Edward IV." — Lardner, 1885

Silver penny of Edward the Confessor

Silver penny of Edward the Confessor

Silver penny of Edward the Confessor

A sceptre from the seal of Edward the Confessor.

Sceptre of Edward the Confessor

A sceptre from the seal of Edward the Confessor.

The heraldic badge of Edward V, the king of England in 1483.

Badge of Edward V

The heraldic badge of Edward V, the king of England in 1483.

King of England

Edward VI

King of England

"Edward VI, and his Council. From a wood-cut on the title-page of 'Acts of Parliament," A.D. 1551." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Edward VI

"Edward VI, and his Council. From a wood-cut on the title-page of 'Acts of Parliament," A.D. 1551."…

"Coin of Edward VI." &mdash; Lardner, 1885

Coin of Edward VI

"Coin of Edward VI." — Lardner, 1885

Edward VI became King of England and Ireland on January 28, 1547, at just nine years of age. Edward, the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first ruler who was Protestant at the time of his ascension to the throne. Edward's entire rule was mediated through a council of regency as he never reached majority. The council was first led by his uncle, Edward Seymour, and then by John Dudley.

Edward VI. Writing His Journal

Edward VI became King of England and Ireland on January 28, 1547, at just nine years of age. Edward,…

(1841-1910) King of the United Kingdom during 1901-1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria

Edward VII

(1841-1910) King of the United Kingdom during 1901-1910. The eldest son of Queen Victoria

(1330-1376) Prince Edward never became king, for he was outlived by his father.

Edward the Black Prince

(1330-1376) Prince Edward never became king, for he was outlived by his father.

Edward, the Black Prince of England

Edward, the Black Prince

Edward, the Black Prince of England

Image taken from Effigy at Cantebury

Edward, The Black Prince

Image taken from Effigy at Cantebury