"The chariot was discovered in 1903 in an Ertuscan cemetery near Rome. It dates from perhaps 600 B.C. Almost every part of the vehicle is covered with thin plates of bronze, elaborately decorated. The wheels are only two feet in diameter. Since the chariot is too small and delicate for use in warfare, we may believe it to have been intended for ceremonial purposes only."—Webster, 1913

A Graeco-Ertuscan Chariot

"The chariot was discovered in 1903 in an Ertuscan cemetery near Rome. It dates from perhaps 600 B.C.…

"The Italian city of Volterra still preserves in the Porta dell' Arco an interesting relic of Ertuscan times. The archway, one of the original gates of the ancient town, is about twenty feet in height and twelve feet in width. On the keystone and imposts are three curious heads, probably representing the guardian deities of the place."—Webster, 1913

An Ertuscan Arch

"The Italian city of Volterra still preserves in the Porta dell' Arco an interesting relic of Ertuscan…