"Argent, a pile, azure, issuing from the chief between two others, transposed. TRANSPOSED. Charges or bearings placed contrary to their usual situation." -Hall, 1862

Transposed

"Argent, a pile, azure, issuing from the chief between two others, transposed. TRANSPOSED. Charges or…

"Argent, three trefoils, gules, one over two." -Hall, 1862

Trefoils

"Argent, three trefoils, gules, one over two." -Hall, 1862

"TRESSURE. An ordinary not so broad as an orle. It generally forms a border to the inescutcheon. Tressures are frequently borne double, and sometimes treble. They are generally ornamented flory and counter-flory. The example contains only a single tressure." -Hall, 1862

Tressure

"TRESSURE. An ordinary not so broad as an orle. It generally forms a border to the inescutcheon. Tressures…

"Or, a double tressure, gules. The tressure is a border at some distance from the edge of the field, half the breadth of an orle: the tressure may be double or treble." -Hall, 1862

Tressure Ordinary

"Or, a double tressure, gules. The tressure is a border at some distance from the edge of the field,…

"Argent, a double tressure, flory and counter-flory, gules. Tressures are generally ornamented, or borne flory or counter flory as in the annexed example." -Hall, 1862

Double Tressure

"Argent, a double tressure, flory and counter-flory, gules. Tressures are generally ornamented, or borne…

"DOUBLE TRESSURE. Two Tressures, or orles, one within the other." -Hall, 1862

Double Tressure

"DOUBLE TRESSURE. Two Tressures, or orles, one within the other." -Hall, 1862

"Vert, two triangles braced, argent. BRACED. Two figures of the same form, interlacing each other." -Hall, 1862

Triangles Braced

"Vert, two triangles braced, argent. BRACED. Two figures of the same form, interlacing each other."…

A simple pointed triangle shape of a shield or escutcheon in heraldry.

Pointed Triangular Shield

A simple pointed triangle shape of a shield or escutcheon in heraldry.

"Shield and supporters of Jaspar Tudor, K.G., Earl of Pembroke in 1452 and in 1485 Duke of Bedford; second son of Queen Catherine and Owen Tudor."—Aveling, 1891

Shield of Jaspar Tudor

"Shield and supporters of Jaspar Tudor, K.G., Earl of Pembroke in 1452 and in 1485 Duke of Bedford;…

"TURRETED. A wall or castle having small turrets. In the annexed example the square tower has circular turrets at the angles, and is therefore said to be turreted." -Hall, 1862

Turreted

"TURRETED. A wall or castle having small turrets. In the annexed example the square tower has circular…

"Azure, three unicorns' heads proper, erased, horned or. HORNED. This term is used to denote that the horn of a unicorn is of a different tincture from his body." -Hall, 1862

Unicorns Horned

"Azure, three unicorns' heads proper, erased, horned or. HORNED. This term is used to denote that the…

"Argent, three dexter arms, vambraced, couped. VAMBRACED. Armour for the arms." -Hall, 1862

Vambraced

"Argent, three dexter arms, vambraced, couped. VAMBRACED. Armour for the arms." -Hall, 1862

"Vert, a bordure argent, verdoy, of trefoils. VERDOY. A bordure charged with eight leaves." -Hall, 1862

Verdoy

"Vert, a bordure argent, verdoy, of trefoils. VERDOY. A bordure charged with eight leaves." -Hall, 1862

"Gules, a bend sinister, voided, argent. VOIDED. A term applied when any part of an ordinary is left open to the field." -Hall, 1862

Voided

"Gules, a bend sinister, voided, argent. VOIDED. A term applied when any part of an ordinary is left…

"Azure, a voider, argent. In the voider the lines are still wider apart; this ordinary occupies nearly the whole of the field: it may be charged." -Hall, 1862

Voider Ordinary

"Azure, a voider, argent. In the voider the lines are still wider apart; this ordinary occupies nearly…

The Coat of Arms of George Washington's family. It is said to be in inspiration of the stars and stripes on the flag of the United States.

Washington Family Coat of Arms

The Coat of Arms of George Washington's family. It is said to be in inspiration of the stars and stripes…

The coat of arms of Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington.

Arms of Duke of Wellington

The coat of arms of Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington.

"WINGS ERECT. Wings are called erect when their long feathers point upwards." -Hall, 1862

Wings Erect

"WINGS ERECT. Wings are called erect when their long feathers point upwards." -Hall, 1862

"WINGS INVERTED. When the feathers point downwards." -Hall, 1862

Wings Inverted

"WINGS INVERTED. When the feathers point downwards." -Hall, 1862

"Argent, a wivern, wings raised. WIVERN. A chimerical animal, the upper part resembling a dragon." -Hall, 1862

Wivern

"Argent, a wivern, wings raised. WIVERN. A chimerical animal, the upper part resembling a dragon." -Hall,…

"WREATH. A chaplet of two different-coloured silks wound round each other, and placed on the top of the helmet for the crest to rest upon." -Hall, 1862

Round Wreath

"WREATH. A chaplet of two different-coloured silks wound round each other, and placed on the top of…

"WREATH. A chaplet of two different-coloured silks wound round each other, and placed on the top of the helmet for the crest to rest upon. In Heraldry it is usually drawn straight." -Hall, 1862

Straight Wreath

"WREATH. A chaplet of two different-coloured silks wound round each other, and placed on the top of…