"The investment of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, Ark., by the Federal troops under General McClernand, and its bombardment by the Federal gunboats commanded by Rear Admiral D. D. Porter, January 11th, 1863. Fort Hindman was what is known in military parlance as a star fort, with four angles- two on the river and two extending nearly to the morass in the rear. In front of the southwestern angle was a cluster of small houses, into which the enemy had thrown their sharpshooters, and from which a most galling fire was poured upon Burbridge's brigade, which stormed them and carried them by assault. At the given signal, on went the splendid brigade with a shout and a yell, now floundering like bemired horses in the morass, then pausing to dress their lines as if on parade, and anon charging again, regardless of the storm of grape and shell, shot and canister that pelted pitilessly around them. For three long hours they fought ere the houses were carried and made to screen the Federal troops. All that while sharpshooters were picking off, from their secure hiding places, officers and men; 10-pound Parrotts were sending their hissing messengers of death through the lines of the devoted brigade, crushing its bones, spattering its brains, and strewing its path with mangeled corpses and dying men. At last the houses were gained and occupied by the Eighty-third Ohio, which, with the Ninety-sixth Ohio, the Sixteenth, the Sixtieth and Sixty-seventh Indiana and the Twenty-third Wisconsin, had fought for them so gallantly."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hindman

"The investment of Fort Hindman, Arkansas Post, Ark., by the Federal troops under General McClernand,…

"Federal artillery taking up position at the Battle of South Mountain. The Federal movement was admirably executed in face of the well-directed fire from the Confederates, who had the advantage of position and could contest almost every inch of the steep, wooded and rocky approach. By four o'clock (September 14th, 1862) the engagement became general, and the entire ground was vigorously contested until the crest was reached and darkness put an end to the fight. In this engagement the total loss on both sides in killed, wounded and missing was nearly 3,000. General Jesse L. Reno was killed while at the head of his command, and was replaced by General Cox, General Hatch and Colonel Wainwright being severely wounded."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of South Mountain

"Federal artillery taking up position at the Battle of South Mountain. The Federal movement was admirably…

"Siege of Vicksburg- General Sherman's fight with hand grenades, June 13th, 1863. On the 13th of June occurred in the siege of Vicksburg a scene hitherto unparalleled in the Civil War. By two o'clock in the morning General Sherman's corps had pushed up to the rifle pits, and to within twenty yards of one of the bastions. The Confederates threw lighted shells over the parapet on the Federal approach, and received in return twenty-three hand grenades, twenty of which exploded, driving the Confederates out. Cannon had now become useless to either party, and as musketry was of no avail, they had to resort to the old hand grenade."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Vicksburg

"Siege of Vicksburg- General Sherman's fight with hand grenades, June 13th, 1863. On the 13th of June…