Reverse side of American ten cent piece with fasces and olive branch (1916-1945).

Mercury Dime

Reverse side of American ten cent piece with fasces and olive branch (1916-1945).

"Rods bound in the form of a bundle, and containing an axe in the middle, the iron of which projected from them. These rods were carried by lictors before the superior magistrates at Rome, and are often represented on the reverse of consular coins. The following woodcuts give the reverses of four consular coins; in the first of which we see the lictors carrying the fasces on their shoulders; in the second, two fasces, and between them a sella curulis; in the third, two fasces crowned, with the consul standing between them; and in the fourth, the same, only with no crowns around the fasces." — Smith, 1873.

Fasces

"Rods bound in the form of a bundle, and containing an axe in the middle, the iron of which projected…

"In Rom. antiq., bundles of rods, usually of birch, with an ax bound in with them, the blade projecting, borne by lictors before the superior Roman magistrates as a badge of their power over life and limb." -Whitney, 1911

Fasces of a Roman Magistrate

"In Rom. antiq., bundles of rods, usually of birch, with an ax bound in with them, the blade projecting,…

Lictors were guards of magistrates who carried fasces to show power to execute.

Lictors with Fasces

Lictors were guards of magistrates who carried fasces to show power to execute.