"The spade is commonly used for digging and trenching, but much of this work is now better done by means of Parkes's diggging-fork, which is both handier and lighter, and breaks up the ground better than the spade." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Digging-Fork

"The spade is commonly used for digging and trenching, but much of this work is now better done by means…

A drag hoe or pitchfork is a similar design to the draw hoe and fork combined.

Drag Hoe or Pitchfork

A drag hoe or pitchfork is a similar design to the draw hoe and fork combined.

This is a combination draw hoe. It is also called a mattock or fork. It also known as a pitchfork.

Draw Hoe and Fork Combined

This is a combination draw hoe. It is also called a mattock or fork. It also known as a pitchfork.

This type of fork has four flattened prongs. It is ideal for ordinary kitchen garden work, such as lifting potatoes.

Flat-Tined Digging Fork

This type of fork has four flattened prongs. It is ideal for ordinary kitchen garden work, such as lifting…

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

Food, Black and White

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

Food, Color

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

Food, Color

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

Food, Outline

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

Food, Silhouette

This sign is used to indicate that food is available nearby.

An illustration of a fork.

Fork

An illustration of a fork.

An illustration of a fork.

Fork

An illustration of a fork.

This fork is simply designed with scrolls on the very top.

Fork

This fork is simply designed with scrolls on the very top.

This spoon form combination can also refer to a spork, or foon. A hybrid form of cutlery which takes the form of a spoon like scoop featuring three or four fork tines.

Combination Spoon and Fork

This spoon form combination can also refer to a spork, or foon. A hybrid form of cutlery which takes…

The utensil is used to lift food to the mouth or to hold food in place while cooking or cutting it. Food can be lifted either by spearing it on the tines, or by holding it on top of the tines, which are often curved slightly.

Eleven Loop Fork

The utensil is used to lift food to the mouth or to hold food in place while cooking or cutting it.…

"The ordinary spading-fork, with strong, flat tines, is a most serviceable tool; but a good spading-fork may be made from an old manure fork by cutting down the tines." — Baily, 1898

Improvised fork

"The ordinary spading-fork, with strong, flat tines, is a most serviceable tool; but a good spading-fork…

A hand holding a U-shaped tuning fork.

Hand with tuning fork

A hand holding a U-shaped tuning fork.

"The hand-fork, a short-handled three-tined implement, is extremely handy for many purposes, such as loosening weeds for hand-weeding, or for planting or transplanting small subjects; it is also very handy for plunging pots, either indoors or out, in tan-beds, ash-beds or common soil." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Hand-fork

"The hand-fork, a short-handled three-tined implement, is extremely handy for many purposes, such as…

"The fork-tailed kite, (<em>N. furcatus</em>) is twenty-five inches long; the wings and tail black; neck and under parts white; the tail-feathers, twelve in number, are deeply forked, the lateral ones excessively elongated. It feeds on snakes, lizards, and frogs ; it also devours grasshoppers, locusts, and wasps, making attacks on the nests of the latter. This species is common in the South and Southwestern States, and also in the Western States, as far north as Wisconsin." &mdash Goodrich, 1859

Fork-Tailed Kite

"The fork-tailed kite, (N. furcatus) is twenty-five inches long; the wings and tail black;…

An illustration of a man holding a fork and knife in his hands and with a napkin wrapped around his neck.

Man with Fork and Knife

An illustration of a man holding a fork and knife in his hands and with a napkin wrapped around his…

Native to South America, the males of this species are known for their pair of prominent tail feathers.

Fork-Tailed Psalurus

Native to South America, the males of this species are known for their pair of prominent tail feathers.

"Hold a vibrating tuning fork over the mouth of a cylindrical jar about 10 or 18 inches deep, and notive the feebleness of the sound. Pour in water, as shown, and notive that, when the liquid reaches a certain level, the sound suddenly becomes much louder." -Avery 1895

Demonstartion of Resonance Using A Tuning Fork and Water Column

"Hold a vibrating tuning fork over the mouth of a cylindrical jar about 10 or 18 inches deep, and notive…

"Represents a slicing-hoe made by fastening a sheet of metal to the tines of a broken fork." &mdash; Baily, 1898

Home-made scarifier

"Represents a slicing-hoe made by fastening a sheet of metal to the tines of a broken fork." —…

"Sound siren used to reproduce the sound generated by the tuning fork." -Avery 1895

Siren

"Sound siren used to reproduce the sound generated by the tuning fork." -Avery 1895

A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the tines formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel). It resonates at a specific constant pitch when set vibrating by striking it against a surface or with an object, and emits a pure musical tone after waiting a moment to allow some high overtones to die out. The pitch that a particular tuning fork generates depends on the length of the two prongs. Its main use is as a standard of pitch to tune other musical instruments.

Tuning Fork

A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the tines formed from…

A tuning fork on top of a hollow box.

Tuning fork and box

A tuning fork on top of a hollow box.

"Rotation of a Wheel. The same force which throws the wire away from the mercury, will cause the rotation of a spur-wheel. For this purpose the conducting wire, instead of being suspended, as in the former experiment, must be fixed firmly to the arm. A support for the axis of the wheel may be made by soldering a short piece to the side of the conducting wire, so as to make the form of a fork, the lower end of which must be flattened with a hammer, and pierced with fine orifices, o recieve the ends of the axis." &mdash;Comstock, 1850

Wheel Rotation

"Rotation of a Wheel. The same force which throws the wire away from the mercury, will cause the rotation…