Fort Carolina on the River of May

Fort Carolina

Fort Carolina on the River of May

"View from the site of Fort Cornwallis. Fort Cornwallis occupied the ground in the rear of the Episcopal church, now a grave-yard. This view is from within the inclosure, looking northeast, and includes a portion of Schultz's bridge, the Savannah River, and Hamburg upon the opposite bank. In the foreground is seen portions of the church-yard wall, and upon the brink of the river below are [African Americans] employed in placing bales of cotton upon the wharves for transportation to the sea-coast. The wharves are two stories in height, one to be used at low water, the other when the river is 'up.' There were remains of the ditch and embankments of the fort within the grave-yard when I was there; and the trench leading to the water-gate, where the 'Pride-of-India tree is seen, was very visible."—Lossing, 1851

Fort Cornwallis

"View from the site of Fort Cornwallis. Fort Cornwallis occupied the ground in the rear of the Episcopal…

"Fort George, from the water front of the present Castle Garden."—Lossing, 1851

Fort George

"Fort George, from the water front of the present Castle Garden."—Lossing, 1851

View of the camp of the twentieth Indiana Regiment; also of Fort Hatteras and the anchorage at Hatteras inlet, N.C. This camp, was formed when Federal troops occupied the island. It first recieved Colonel Bendix and his German regiment. On their return to Newport News it was taken possession of by the Ninth Zouaves; who vacated it upon the arrival of the Twentieth Indiana Regiment, October 5, 1861, the Ninth removing to Camp Wool.

Fort Hatteras

View of the camp of the twentieth Indiana Regiment; also of Fort Hatteras and the anchorage at Hatteras…

Pedro Melendez, a Spanish soldier who landed at and named St. Augustine and attacked the French at Fort Carolina.

Pedro Melendez

Pedro Melendez, a Spanish soldier who landed at and named St. Augustine and attacked the French at Fort…

"View at Fort Moultrie. This view is from the southwestern angle of Fort Sullivan, looking toward Jame's Island. That angle, with cannons, a portion of the barracks, and the flag-staff, are seen on the right. The small building toward the left marks the center of the old Palmetto Fort. In the distance is seen Fort Sumter, and in the extreme distance, close by the angle of the fort, is seen the village upon the site of old Fort Johnson. Charleston bar, at the entrance of the harbor, is about six miles from the city. The width of the inner harbor, at its mouth, is about a mile wide. This is guarded by Forts Moultrie, Sumter, and Johnson, and by Castle Pickney, a handsome work in front of the city, within the inner harbor."—Lossing, 1851

Fort Moultrie

"View at Fort Moultrie. This view is from the southwestern angle of Fort Sullivan, looking toward Jame's…

Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island at the entrance to the Savannah River, Georgia, was built by the United States Government in 1829-31, for the defense of Tybee Roads and the Savannah River approach to the city of Savannah, Georgia. In January, 1861, it was seized and occupied by the military authorities of the State of Georgia, and held by them until transferred to the Confederate Government, by whom it was strongly armed and garrisoned. In form it was pentagonal; its walls were forty feet high, and presented two faces on the sea approach. The full armament of the fort consisted on the lower tier of 65 32-pounders, and the upper tier of 53 24-pounders, 4 18-pounders flanking howitzers, 1 13-inch mortar, 12 8-inch columbiads, and 7 10-inch mortars. The interior of the fort was well supplied with massive furnaces for heating shot, officers' quarters, soldiers' barracks, magazines, and a tolerable supply of shot and powder.

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island at the entrance to the Savannah River, Georgia, was built by the United…

"Fort Sullivan"—Lossing, 1851

Fort Sullivan

"Fort Sullivan"—Lossing, 1851

"Site of Fort Watson."—Lossing, 1851

<p>The Siege of Fort Watson was an American Revolutionary War confrontation in South Carolina that began on April 15, 1781 and lasted until April 23, 1781. Continental Army forces under Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee and South Carolina militia under Francis Marion besieged Fort Watson, a fortified British outpost that formed part of the communication and supply chain between Charleston and other British outposts further inland.

<p>The attackers, lacking artillery, were unable to make a dent in the fortified works, and failed in attempts to deny the garrison of a water supply. They then devised a plan to build a tower from which sharpshooters could fire into the fort's walls. Fort Watson was once again attacked by the Americans on April 23, with the British forces unable to control the walls due to musket fire from the tower. They surrendered shortly afterwards.

Fort Watson

"Site of Fort Watson."—Lossing, 1851 The Siege of Fort Watson was an American Revolutionary War confrontation…