"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." —Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." —Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." —Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861. This spot, where Fremont's army rested after their first day's march from Tipton, is on the vast prairies of Missouri, about fifteen miles from Tipton and two miles from Wheatland. The Grand Army of the West here pitched their tents on the afternoon of the 14th of October, 1861. A brilliant sunset fell over the whole, which looked more like a monster picnic than the advanced corps of an army bent on the destruction of traitorous brothers. The rapidity with which the evening's meal for a marching regiment is prepared has something of the marvelous in it. Appetite quickens practice, and the air is soon filled with the savory aromas of culinary processes. Then comes the hearty enjoyment of food which at another time would be passed by, but which now, under the appetizing provocative of hunger, is thankfully received. Not the least of a soldier's trials is the inroad a long march and privation makes upon that fastidiousness which plenty to eat engenders in the human diaphragm. The camp was called after the colonel of General Fremont's bodyguard, whose gallant achievements at Springfield on the 25th of October we have recorded." —Leslie, 1896

Camp Zagonyi

"Camp Zagonyi, encampment of Fremont's army on the prairie, near Wheatland, Mo., October 14th, 1861.…

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the Confederate General Jackson and his army." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Pontoon bridge

"General Fremont's Division crossing the Pontoon Bridge over the Shenandoah River in pursuit of the…

"The army of General Fremont on its march up the Shenandoah Valley- wounded and ragged soldiers. Fremont crossed the mountains with as little delay as was practicable, and through heavy roads reached Strasburg just after Jackson had passed through it. There he was joined the following morning by General Bayard, who brought with him the vanguard of Shields's cavalry, and, without waiting for re-enforcements or to afford the fatigued troops their much-needed rest, they immediately started in pursuit of Jackson. They shortly after overtook his rear, with which they had a slight skirmish, and followed close upon the retreating force, until their advance was checked by the burning of the Mount Jackson bridge." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Shenandoah Valley

"The army of General Fremont on its march up the Shenandoah Valley- wounded and ragged soldiers. Fremont…

"In the Shenandoah Valley- General Fremont's division marching through the woods to attack the Confederates. This exciting pursuit commenced on Saturday, May 31st, 1862, when the first collision occurred between the hostile armies in the lower valley, near Strasburg, to which place Jackson had fallen back from the Potomac upon hearing that Fremont was on the march to intercept him. In this retreat the indomitable and daring Ashby, the "Murat of the Confederates," occupied the post of danger, dashing against the Federal troops whenever they pressed the retreating enemy too closely. At ten o'clock on the 31st the First Jersey Cavalry, led by the gallant Wyndham, and Ashby's men had a desperate skirmish, in which the Confederates were driven back with some loss. Jackson rested his Confederate troops in Strasburg this night, and next morning resumed his retreat, when the Ashby cavalry and the First Jersey had another and heavier conflict, in which artillery was used. That night the enemy occupied Woodstock, having made fourteen miles in their retreat this day. So close was the Federal advance on the Confederates that General Bayard's cavalry, when they entered Strasburg, captured the Confederate provost marshal and two hundred men. At the village of Edinburgh, five miles from Woodstock, the Confederate General Ashby, by Jackson's orders, after seeing the rear guard safely across the bridge over Stony Creek, fired the wooden structure, and it was soon enveloped in flames." —Leslie, 1896

Strasburg woods

"In the Shenandoah Valley- General Fremont's division marching through the woods to attack the Confederates.…