"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday, July 8th, 1862, near Harrison's Landing, Va." —Leslie, 1896

Review of Federal Army

"President Lincoln, attended by General McClellan and staff, reviewing the Federal army, on Tuesday,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan, in 1861. This beautiful little town is situated on the banks of the Monongahela, and is the junction of the Norhwestern Virginia Railroad. It is ninety-six miles below Wheeling, one hundred and ninety from Pittsburg, and two hundred and seventy-nine miles from Baltimore. Its principal hotel was the Grafton House, owned by the railroad company, and conducted on very liberal principles. The town was occupied by the Federal troops in 1861, and was a position of considerable importance. The beauty of its situation can be readily seen from our sketch. It is one hundred and ninety-eight miles from Harper's Ferry, and two hundred and one from Cumberland." —Leslie, 1896

Grafton

"View of Grafton, West Virginia, occupied by the Federal Troops, under the command of General McClellan,…

"Advance of General Rosecrans's division through the forests of Laurel Hill to attack the Confederate intrenchments at Rich Mountain. General McClellan's plan for attacking the Confederates under General Garnett in Western Virginia and driving them beyond the Alleghanies involved the surprise of a large body strongly intrenched at Rich Mountain, in a position commanding the turnpike over Laurel Hill. He detailed General Rosecrans to surprise them. This in turn involved a circuitous march through the dense forests of Laurel Hill, over a wild nd broken country. General Rosecrans's column of 1,600 men was guided by a woddsman named David L. Hart, who described the march as follows: "We started at daylight, and I led, accompanied by Colonel Lander, through a pathless wood, obstructed by bushes, laurels, fallen timber and rocks, followed by the whole division in perfect silence. It ended in the utter rout and final capture of the Confederates under Colonel Pegram, with a loss of 150 killed and 300 wounded." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Laurel Hill

"Advance of General Rosecrans's division through the forests of Laurel Hill to attack the Confederate…

"Taking away the colors of the Seventy-ninth New York Regiment for insubordination and mutiny, Washington, D. C., August 14th, 1861. The scene during the reading of the order of General McClellan was exceedingly impressive. The sun was just going down, and in hazy mountain twilight the features and forms of officers and men could scarcely be distinguished. Immediately behind his aid was General Porter, firm and self-possessed. Colonel Stevens was in front of the regiment, endeavoring to quiet his rather nervous horse. In the rear of the regulars, and a little distance apart, General Sickles sat carelessly on horseback, cooly smoking a cigar and conversing with some friends. At one time during the reading a murmur passed through the lines of the mutineers; and when the portion of the order directing the regiment to surrentder its colors was read a private in one of the rear lines cried out, in broad Scotch tones, "Let's keep the colors, boys!" No response was made by the remainder of the regiment. Major Sykes at once rode up the line to where the voice was heard. It would have been more than the soldier's life was worth had he been discovered at the moment in pistol range by any of the officers." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Seventy-ninth Regiment

"Taking away the colors of the Seventy-ninth New York Regiment for insubordination and mutiny, Washington,…

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ship

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ships at the burning of the White House.

Ship

Ships at the burning of the White House.

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position at the White House, and breaking up the commisariat depot on the Pamunkey River- departure of the Union flortilla for the James River, June 26th, 1862. The Confederate raid of Stuart's cavalry at Garlick's Landing and Tunstall's Station had struck the occupants of the White House Landing with a deep sense of insecurity; and, consequently, when they received orders on Wednesday, June 25th, to prepare for the hasty removal of all the government stores, they set to work with great activity, and by Thursday the greater portion of the heavy stores were embarked on board the numerous transports lying in the river. Unfortunately, through some accident the White house took fire, and the house of Washington's wife was soon destroyed." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of the White House

"Burning of the White House- the Federal troops, by command of General McClellan, abandoning their position…