The illustration of a lady from the Burgess family. This shows how women of nobility would dress during the fourteenth century. The Lady Burgess is wearing a crown like head piece with cloth covering the head.

Lady of Burgess Family

The illustration of a lady from the Burgess family. This shows how women of nobility would dress during…

A woman wearing an evening gown standing properly.

Evening Gown

A woman wearing an evening gown standing properly.

"There are scores of men in long gowns, with white, red, blue, or green turbans about their heads." —Carpenter, 1902

Turkish men

"There are scores of men in long gowns, with white, red, blue, or green turbans about their heads."…

A church monument of a woman in Wantage during the fourteenth century. She is wearing a dress, cape, and a hair dress common during the period.

Wantage Church Monument

A church monument of a woman in Wantage during the fourteenth century. She is wearing a dress, cape,…

"Toga, a gown, the name of the principal outer garment worn by the romans, seems to have been received by them from the Etruscans. The toga was the peculiar distinction of the Romans, who were thence called togats or gens togata. It was originally worn only in Rome itself, and the use of it was forbidden alike to exiles and to foreigners. Gradually, however, it went out of common use, and was supplanted by the pallium and lacerna, or else it was worn in public under the lacerna. But it was still used by the upper classes, who regarded it as an honourable distinction, in the courts of justice, by clients when they received the Sportula, and in the theatre or at the games, at least when the emperor was present." &mdash Smith; 1873

Toga

"Toga, a gown, the name of the principal outer garment worn by the romans, seems to have been received…

"The following cuts represent, the first more ancient, and the second the later mode of wearing the toga." — Anthon, 1891

Roman Togas

"The following cuts represent, the first more ancient, and the second the later mode of wearing the…

"These are two Turkish women, who have their heads and faces wrapped up." —Carpenter, 1902

Turkish women

"These are two Turkish women, who have their heads and faces wrapped up." —Carpenter, 1902