This Greek Cyprian vessel has a geometrical style made out of yellow clay and painted in brown.

Greek Cyprian Vessel

This Greek Cyprian vessel has a geometrical style made out of yellow clay and painted in brown.

Vases and other pottery made by the ancient Greeks.

Classic Vessels

Vases and other pottery made by the ancient Greeks.

"Heathen Deities: Vesta"-Willson, 1859.

Vesta

"Heathen Deities: Vesta"-Willson, 1859.

The Temple of the Wingless Victory.

Temple of the Wingless Victory

The Temple of the Wingless Victory.

"Heathen Deities: Vulcan"-Willson, 1859.

Vulcan

"Heathen Deities: Vulcan"-Willson, 1859.

A banner showing ancient Greek battles.

War Banner

A banner showing ancient Greek battles.

"After the fall of Athens Sparta stood without a rival in Greece." — Smith, 1882

Greek warriot

"After the fall of Athens Sparta stood without a rival in Greece." — Smith, 1882

An assortment of lances, darts, and pikes.

Weapons

An assortment of lances, darts, and pikes.

A Greek woman laying peacefully on an alter.

Woman laying down

A Greek woman laying peacefully on an alter.

An illustration of eight different types of Greek women.

Types of Greek Women

An illustration of eight different types of Greek women.

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of union among the various branches of the Greek race, and in keeping alive a feeling of their common origin. They were open to all persons who could prove their Hellenic blood, and were frequented by spectators from all parts of the Grecian world. They were celebrated at Olympia, on the banks of the alpheus, in the territory of Elis." — Smith, 1882

Wrestling

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of…

"Zeus of Otricoli. (Marble bust in the Vatican.)" — The Delphian Society, 1913

Zeus

"Zeus of Otricoli. (Marble bust in the Vatican.)" — The Delphian Society, 1913

Zeus and Europa.

Zeus and Europa

Zeus and Europa.

"Athens is said to have derrived its name from the prominence given to its worship of Athena by its king erechtheus. The inhabitants were previously called Crannai and Cecropidae, from Cecrops, who, according to tradition, was the original founder of the city. This at first occupied the hill or rock which afterwards became the <em>Acropolis</em>, but gradually the buildings began to spread over the ground at the southern foot of this hill. It was not till the time of Pisitratus and his sons (B.C. 560-514) that the city began to assume any degree of splendour. The most remarkable of these building deposits was the gigantic temple of the Olympian Zeus, which, however, was not finished till many centuries later."&mdash; Smith, 1882

Temple of the Olympian Zeus

"Athens is said to have derrived its name from the prominence given to its worship of Athena by its…