T point, or direct as a gun.

Aim

T point, or direct as a gun.

Instruments or weapons of offence or defense.

Arms

Instruments or weapons of offence or defense.

Also known as a harquebus, the first form of handgun which could fairly be compared with the modern musket.

Arquebus

Also known as a harquebus, the first form of handgun which could fairly be compared with the modern…

Fort Beauregard, at Bay Point, on the point opposite Fort Walker, was built of sand and palmetto logs on a sand spit on the extreme southerly end of Hunting Island. The work on the harbor or sea front was what is termed a lunette, and mounted twelve guns. To the right of this lunette was a small salient mounting three guns, and to the left, a small work, or redan, mounting two guns. In the work was a large magazine which, when captured by the Frederal Troops, contained one thousand five hundred rounds of fixed ammunition, and in the wet ditch were large quantities of loose powder, destroyed by the Confederates before they evacuated the fort.

Interior View of Fort Beauregard

Fort Beauregard, at Bay Point, on the point opposite Fort Walker, was built of sand and palmetto logs…

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." —Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler, detaching itself from General Slocum's division and rushing to the support of the General Kearny's division, which had been driven back, thus turning the fortunes of the day, June 30th, 1862, six o'clock p.m." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Charles City

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler,…

An illustration of a rifle expert medal.

Rifle Expert Medal

An illustration of a rifle expert medal.

A magazine is an ammunition storage and feeding device within or attached to a repeating firearm. magazines may be integral to the firearm or removable. The magazine functions by moving the cartridges stored in the magazine into a position where they may be loaded into the chamber by the action of the firearm.

Magazine Firearm

A magazine is an ammunition storage and feeding device within or attached to a repeating firearm. magazines…

The fort was built by the British Army and Canadian militia troops in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, to defend the settlement and the new capital of the Upper Canada region from the threat of a military attack, principally from the newly independent United States.

Fort York

The fort was built by the British Army and Canadian militia troops in the late eighteenth and early…

An early French gun.

French Gun

An early French gun.

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment and gun was in place. Some were in the broad, open field and others under the cover of the woods. The day was intensely warm, and many of the men, worn out with their previous day's fighting, lack of sleep and toilsome march, had already thrown themselves upon the ground and were indulging in a short slumber, when a sharp volley and then the roar of artillery announced that the Confederates had opened the fight. Their shells burst in front of the farmhouse which General Morell had made his headquarters. The Federal batteries, after some little delay, replied and for an hour this artillery duel and shelling the woods continued. It was not till near three o'clock in the afternoon that the engagement became general, and then the battle raged for four hours with unexampled fury. As though by common consent, there was a pause now; but it did not last long, for the enemy had evidently received large re-enforcements, as the whole Federal line was attacked, with a vigor which showed that those who made it were fresh men. To prevent defeat, General Porter sent for re-enforcements, for under the additional pressure the Federal troops were giving way. Fortunately, General Slocum's division came to the rescue, and with it Generals Palmer, French and Meagher with their brigades and two bodies of cavalry. This changed the character of the struggle. Meagher's gallant gellows, coats off and sleeves rolled up, charged the enemy and drove them back. General Palmer's men and Duryee's Zouaves also went in with valor, and finally the Confederates rolled back like a retreating wave. This was the close of the day's fight. Toward the end the Federals had fifty-four regiments on the field, numbering about 36,000 men." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Gaines's Mill

"Battle of Gaines's Mill, Friday, June 27th, 1862. At eleven o'clock each division, brigade, regiment…

A common musket, or rifle, etc.

Gun

A common musket, or rifle, etc.

A flintlock gun from Colonial times.

Gun

A flintlock gun from Colonial times.

A howitzer is a type of artillery piece that is characterized by a relatively short barrel and the use of comparatively small explosive charges to propel projectiles at trajectories with a steep angle of descent. In the taxonomies of artillery pieces used by European (and European-style) armies in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, the howitzer stood between the "gun" (which was characterized by a longer barrel, larger propelling charges, smaller shells, higher velocities and flatter trajectories) and the "mortar" (which has the ability to fire projectiles at even higher angles of ascent and descent).

Howitzer

A howitzer is a type of artillery piece that is characterized by a relatively short barrel and the use…

An illustration of a krupp cupola for two 28 centimeter (11") guns.

Krupp Cupola for Two 28-cm Guns

An illustration of a krupp cupola for two 28 centimeter (11") guns.

An illustration of an army man standing at rest with a rifle.

Army Man at Rest with Rifle

An illustration of an army man standing at rest with a rifle.

An adult male riding away from soldiers on a horse.

Man Riding a Horse

An adult male riding away from soldiers on a horse.

An illustration of a rifle marksman medal.

Rifle Marksman Medal

An illustration of a rifle marksman medal.

The Massachusetts Sixth is the first to leave to save Washington from the Confederates. However, they have trouble in Baltimore on their journey where they are attacked by the Confederates.

Massachusetts Sixth Attacked When Marching Through Baltimore

The Massachusetts Sixth is the first to leave to save Washington from the Confederates. However, they…

USS <em>Monitor</em> was the first ironclad warship commissioned by the United States Navy. <em>Monitor</em> consisted of a heavy round revolving iron gun turret on the deck, housing two 11 inch Dahlgren guns, paired side by side.

Interior of the Monitor's Turret

USS Monitor was the first ironclad warship commissioned by the United States Navy. Monitor

An illustration of a mortar battery located at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. A mortar is a muzzleloading indirect fire weapon that fires shells at low velocities, short ranges, and high-arcing ballistic trajectories. A battery is a until of weapons grouped in order to facilitate better battlefield communication and command and control, as well as to provide dispersion for its constitute gunnery crews and their systems.

Mortar Battery

An illustration of a mortar battery located at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. A mortar is a muzzleloading indirect…

A kind of fire-arm discharged by a percussion-lock.

Musket

A kind of fire-arm discharged by a percussion-lock.

An illustration of a rifle sharpshooter rifle.

Rifle Sharpshooter Medal

An illustration of a rifle sharpshooter rifle.

Soldiers lined up and firing.

Soldiers

Soldiers lined up and firing.

A scene from Kipling's Wee Willie Winkie.

Wee Willie Winkie

A scene from Kipling's Wee Willie Winkie.

The Western Battery was built by the British Army. With ample supply of trees from the surrounding area it was made of wood. It had two guns with a blockhouse.

Remains of the Western Battery in 1860

The Western Battery was built by the British Army. With ample supply of trees from the surrounding area…