Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm.  <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Mixed Consonant positions have the second, third, and fourth fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Mixed Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm.  <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Mixed Consonant positions have the second, third, and fourth fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Non-Vocal Mixed Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Non-Vocal Mixed-Divided Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Mixed-Divided Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Mixed-Divided Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Non-Vocal Mixed-Divided Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Non-Vocal Nasal Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Nasal Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Nasal Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Non-Vocal Nasal Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p>Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Non-Vocal Primary Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm.  <p>Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Primary Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p>Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Primary Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Throat Consonant positions differ from those of the Back in having the index and center fingers separated.

Non-Vocal Primary Throat Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Throat Consonant positions differ from those of the Back in having the index and center fingers separated.

Non-Vocal Primary Throat Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p>Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Non-Vocal Primary Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Non-Vocal Shut Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Shut Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Non-Vocal Shut Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Throat Consonant positions differ from those of the Back in having the index and center fingers separated.

Non-Vocal Shut Throat Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Non-Vocal Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb bent at right angles to the breath phalanx, or unaccented. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Non-Vocal Shut Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. From the Vocalized Throat primary consonant which represents guttural contraction, we may derive a very appropriate orinasal symbol by placing the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position for nasality. This symbol acts retrospectively, so in representing an orinasal we represent the vowel in the usual way and immediately follow it with the orinasal symbol.

Orinasal Symbol Throat Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Divided Consonant positions have the first and second fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Divided Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Divided Consonant positions have the first and second fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Divided Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Divided Consonant positions have the first and second fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Divided Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Divided Consonant positions have the first and second fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Divided Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed Consonant positions have the second, third, and fourth fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Mixed Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed Consonant positions have the second, third, and fourth fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Mixed Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed Consonant positions have the second, third, and fourth fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Mixed Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed Consonant positions have the second, third, and fourth fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Mixed Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Mixed-Divided Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Mixed-Divided Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Mixed-Divided Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Mixed-Divided Consonant positions have all of the fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Mixed-Divided Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Nasal Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Nasal Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions.  Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Nasal Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Nasal Consonant positions have the breath phalanx of the thumb in the position to indicate Nasality. None of the fingers are accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Nasal Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Primary Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Primary Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Primary Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Throat Consonant positions differ from those of the Back in having the index and center fingers separated.

Vocalized Primary Throat Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Primary Consonant positions have only the first finger accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Primary Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Back Consonant positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Vocalized Shut Back Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Lip Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Shut Lip Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Point Consonant positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Vocalized Shut Point Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production some part of the throat or mouth obstructs, squeezes, or divides the breath. &hellip;in representing consonants the hand suggests a narrow adjustment of the organs, by having the prominent or accented fingers straightened and the second phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm. <p> Vocalized Consonant positions have the voice phalanx of the thumb accented; that is, brought in line with the breath phalanx; this constitutes the only difference between the Vocalized and analogous Non-Vocal Consonant positions. Shut Consonant positions do not have any of the fingers accented. Top Consonant positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Vocalized Shut Top Consonant

Consonants have a closed or narrowly expanded adjustment of the vocal organs, so that in their production…

The end of a hand plow. The metal part can be unscrewed and affixed to a hand plow, or left on the handle.

Hand cultivator

The end of a hand plow. The metal part can be unscrewed and affixed to a hand plow, or left on the handle.

The cuneiform may be distinguished by its pyramidal shape, and by its having an oval, isolated facet for articulation with pisiform bone. It is situated at the upper and inner side of the carpus. Shown is the left cuneiform, showing palmar and lateral surfaces.

Cuneiform Bone

The cuneiform may be distinguished by its pyramidal shape, and by its having an oval, isolated facet…

"Cutting pliers and cutting nippers have a pair of knife edges so arranged as to work exactly opposite to one another, the handles, on being tightly grasped, affording sufficient leverage for these edges to be forced to a short distance into the two opposite sides of a nail or wire, which, if of small diameter or of soft metal, can thus be cut asunder." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Cutting Pliers

"Cutting pliers and cutting nippers have a pair of knife edges so arranged as to work exactly opposite…

One-handed Sign for D.

D

One-handed Sign for D.

Two-handed Sign for D.

D

Two-handed Sign for D.

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents determination or anger.

Determination

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents determination or anger.

1) The first or index finger. 2) The second or middle finger. 3) The third finger. 4) The fourth finger. 5) The finger's first or lower phalanx. 8) The thumb's second or breath phalanx. 9) The thumb's terminal or voice phalanx. 10) The Palm. 11) The wrist.

Explanatory Diagram

1) The first or index finger. 2) The second or middle finger. 3) The third finger. 4) The fourth finger.…

"The dovetail saw or tenon saw." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Dovetail Saw

"The dovetail saw or tenon saw." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

A hand holds and employs a drafting compass, a device used to create precise arcs and circles in mechanical drawing.

Hand Holding a Drafting Compass

A hand holds and employs a drafting compass, a device used to create precise arcs and circles in mechanical…

Side view of a hand drawing on a mechanical drawing board.

Hand Drawing

Side view of a hand drawing on a mechanical drawing board.

A portable hand drill.

Ratchet Drill

A portable hand drill.

One-handed Sign for E.

E

One-handed Sign for E.

Two-handed Sign for E.

E

Two-handed Sign for E.