This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents an earnest entreaty.

Earnest Entreaty

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents an earnest entreaty.

A glove from the Elizabethan era.

Elizabethan Glove

A glove from the Elizabethan era.

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents a emphatic declaration.

Emphatic Declaration

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents a emphatic declaration.

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents an energetic appeal.

Energetic Appeal

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents an energetic appeal.

"The wood used for engraving is boxwood, nearly all of which is imported from Turkey." —The Popular Cyclopedia, 1888

Wood engraving

"The wood used for engraving is boxwood, nearly all of which is imported from Turkey." —The Popular…

One-handed Sign for F.

F

One-handed Sign for F.

Two-handed Sign for F.

F

Two-handed Sign for F.

An illustration of an African American slave who works as a field hand.

Field Hand

An illustration of an African American slave who works as a field hand.

"If the conducting wire is bent into the form shown, the lines of force will pas around the wire from one face of the loop to the other, and in the direction indicated by the 'rule of thumb' just given." -Avery 1895

Magnetic Field Around a Current Carrying Wire

"If the conducting wire is bent into the form shown, the lines of force will pas around the wire from…

A hand making a man running. Could also be the motion for the first half of "Jack be nimble, Jack be quick."

Finger Man

A hand making a man running. Could also be the motion for the first half of "Jack be nimble, Jack be…

A hand making a man jumping over the other hand's thumb. Could be the motion for the second half of Jack Be Nimble..."Jack, jump over the candlestick."

Finger Man Jumping

A hand making a man jumping over the other hand's thumb. Could be the motion for the second half of…

The tendons attached to the right index finger.

Tendon Attached to the Finger

The tendons attached to the right index finger.

Section through the bases of the right fingers.

Cross Section Through Fingers

Section through the bases of the right fingers.

A flask being heated over an open flame, with a tube and jar attached.

Heated flask

A flask being heated over an open flame, with a tube and jar attached.

Deep dissection of the front of the forearm and hand, showing the muscles, nerves, blood vessels, etc. Labels: 1, supinator longus (cut); 2, ulnar nerve; 3, brachialis anticus; 4, biceps; 5, musculo-spiral nerve; 6, median nerve; 7, posterior interosseous nerve; 8, pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis (cut); 9, extensor carpi radialis longior (cut); 10, brachial artery; 11, supinator brevis; 12, flexor sublimis digitorum (cut); 13, 13, radial nerve; 14, 14, flexor carpi ulnaris; 15, extensor carpi radialis brevior; 16, ulnar artery; 17, radial origin of flexor sublimis digitorum (cut); 18, flexor profundus digitorum; 19, tendon of pronator teres (cut); 20, 20, dorsal branch of ulnar nerve; 21, 21, radial artery; 22, 22, deep branch of ulnar nerve; 23, flexor longus pollicis; 24, abductor minimii digiti; 25, anterior interosseous nerve; 26, digital branches of ulnar nerve; 27, tendon of supinator longus (cut); 28, one of the lumbricales muscles (cut); 29, pronator quadratus (cut open); 31, tendon of flexor carpi radialis (cut); 33, digital branches of median nerve; 35, abductor pollicis.

Forearm and Hand

Deep dissection of the front of the forearm and hand, showing the muscles, nerves, blood vessels, etc.…

View of the nerves on the back part of the forearm and hand.

Nerves of the Forearm and Hand

View of the nerves on the back part of the forearm and hand.

One-handed Sign for G.

G

One-handed Sign for G.

Two-handed Sign for G.

G

Two-handed Sign for G.

"A gauge." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gauge

"A gauge." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"GAUNTLET. Armour for the hand." -Hall, 1862

Gauntlet

"GAUNTLET. Armour for the hand." -Hall, 1862

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents gentle entreaty.

Gentle Entreaty

This diagram shows a hand gesture that represents gentle entreaty.

This illustration shows a Georgian glove.

Georgian Glove

This illustration shows a Georgian glove.

"The Gimlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gimlet

"The Gimlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"The Gimlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gimlet

"The Gimlet." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

A girl standing with her hands to her face, crying.

Girl Crying

A girl standing with her hands to her face, crying.

A girl standing with her arm in front of her, pointing at something.

Girl Pointing

A girl standing with her arm in front of her, pointing at something.

A girl standing with her hands at her shoulders.

Girl Standing

A girl standing with her hands at her shoulders.

A girl standing with her hands straight out in the air.

Girl Standing

A girl standing with her hands straight out in the air.

"A form of glass cutter with a cast-iron handle." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Glass Cutter

"A form of glass cutter with a cast-iron handle." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Back-Glide – A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized back primary consonant.

Back-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Back Mixed-Glide – A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized back Mixed consonant.

Back Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperture consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Breath-Glide - A transitional aspiration, of organic quality corresponding to that of the adjoining elements [a soft effect of the Consonants, back primary; top primary; Point primary; Lip primary; etc.]. Although this glide has no fixed abiding place, and is of a somewhat variable organic formation, in its effect it is very closely allied to the Throat consonant aspirate, and is therefore represented with a posterior position of the palm and a separation of the index and center fingers, which are characteristic features of Throat positions. This is the only Non-Vocal glide, and hence is the only one in the representation of which the voice phalanx is unaccented.

Breath-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented. Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers. Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated High Primary Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Primary Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Primary Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Primary Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated High Wide Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Wide Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated High Wide Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a High Vowel, have the third finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated High Wide Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Low Primary Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers. Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Primary Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Primary Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.   Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers. Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Low Primary Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Low Wide Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Wide Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Low Wide Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Low, have the first finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Low Wide Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Mid Primary Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Primary Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Primary Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Primary glides-indicated have closed unaccented fingers.  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Mid Primary Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Back Glide-Indicated positions, being posterior, have the palm held laterally at an angle to the arm.

Indicated Mid Wide Back Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Lip Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Wide Lip Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Point Glide-Indicated positions, being anterior, have the palm upright and in line with the arm.

Indicated Mid Wide Point Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. <p> Glides-Indicated positions are distinguished by having the accent finger straightened, and the accented voice phalanx of the thumb in contact with that finger's second phalanx. They are adapted to illustrate the easy transition from Vowel to Glide. Glides-Indicated possess exactly the same phonetic value and significance as the Glides which they respectively replace. When used with a Mid, have the center finger accented.  Straightened unaccented fingers should be employed only to indicate "Wide".  Top Glide-Indicated positions have the lower phalanges of the fingers at right angles to the plane of the palm.

Indicated Mid Wide Top Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. Lip-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Lip primary consonant.

Lip-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Lip Mixed-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Lip Mixed consonant.

Lip Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions. Point-Glide &ndash; A semi-vowelized sound of the Vocalized Point primary consonant.

Point-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics of certain central-aperature consonants with the wide or expanded quality of vowels, but differing from vowels in not having a fixed configuration. ...in representing glides the peculiarities of consonants and vowels are blended: the accented fingers, by being straightened, contribute a consonant characteristic; while the second phalanx of the thumb, by being held at an angle to the plane of the palm, imparts to the glide positions the wide, without giving them the firm, quality of vowel positions.

Point Mixed-Glide

Glides are only transitional sounds. They are intermediate to Consonants and Vowels, combining the characteristics…