A hand

Hand

A hand

An artificial hand made of iron.

Hand

An artificial hand made of iron.

1. Nerves of the skin 2. Tendons 3. Arteries of the palm of the hand 4. Elbow nerve 5. Elbow artery 6. Nerve of the forearm 7. Nerve of the under-arm 8. Artery of the underarm.

Hand

1. Nerves of the skin 2. Tendons 3. Arteries of the palm of the hand 4. Elbow nerve 5. Elbow artery…

Hand holding pencil

Hand holding pencil

Hand holding pencil

Hand holding string.

Hand holding string

Hand holding string.

Hand holding string.

Hand holding string

Hand holding string.

Hands with coins

Hands with coins

Hands with coins

Hands with coins

Hands with coins

Hands with coins

Hand with stick

Hand with stick

Hand with stick

Hand-shadow of Butterfly

Butterfly

Hand-shadow of Butterfly

Hand-shadow of Camel

Camel

Hand-shadow of Camel

Hand-shadow of Chamois

Chamois

Hand-shadow of Chamois

Hand-shadow of Dog

Dog

Hand-shadow of Dog

Hand-shadow of Donkey

Donkey

Hand-shadow of Donkey

Hand-shadow of Elephant

Elephant

Hand-shadow of Elephant

Hand-shadow of Goat

Goat

Hand-shadow of Goat

Hand-shadow of Goose

Goose

Hand-shadow of Goose

Hand-shadow of Hound

Hound

Hand-shadow of Hound

Hand-shadow of Ox

Ox

Hand-shadow of Ox

Hand-shadow of Pig

Pig

Hand-shadow of Pig

Hand-shadow of Rabbit

Rabbit

Hand-shadow of Rabbit

Hand-shadow of Reindeer

Reindeer

Hand-shadow of Reindeer

Hand-shadow of Teddy Bear

Teddy Bear

Hand-shadow of Teddy Bear

Hand-shadow of Wolf

Wolf

Hand-shadow of Wolf

Two hands.

Hands

Two hands.

An illustration of three hands handing a man cards.

Multiple Hands Handing Man Cards

An illustration of three hands handing a man cards.

An illustration of two hands shaking with a man standing in the distance at attention.

Hands Shaking & Man at Attention

An illustration of two hands shaking with a man standing in the distance at attention.

Two hands with string.

Hands tying knots

Two hands with string.

Two hands with string.

Hands tying knots

Two hands with string.

Hands preparing to spin a coin

Hands with coin

Hands preparing to spin a coin

This diagram is of two hands clasped together.

Clasped hands

This diagram is of two hands clasped together.

This diagram is of two hands pressed together to form a praying position.

Praying Positioned Hands

This diagram is of two hands pressed together to form a praying position.

An illustration of hands depicting 6 US Style

United States Style Counting Hands

An illustration of hands depicting 6 US Style

1. Collar bone 2. Left Lung 3. Breast Bone 4. Right Lung 5. Ribs 6. Right lobe of the liver 7. Left lobe of the liver 8. Cartilage 9. Stomach 10. Spleen 11. Descending colon 12. Transverse colon 13. Ascending colon 14. Omentum 15. Coecum 16. Verniform appendix 17.Mesentery 18. Small intestines 19. Sigmoid Flexure 20. Bladder

Internal Anatomy

1. Collar bone 2. Left Lung 3. Breast Bone 4. Right Lung 5. Ribs 6. Right lobe of the liver 7. Left…

An illustration of two men shaking hands.

Two Men Shaking Hands

An illustration of two men shaking hands.

A glove from the middle 19th century.

Middle 19th Century Glove

A glove from the middle 19th century.

Hands forming a nest for a bird.

Hand Nest

Hands forming a nest for a bird.

Physiological Bases of the Visible Speech Symbols - Consonants. In representing the consonant a peculiar and exclusive mode of accenting ... the important ... parts of the hand is resorted to, so that, when the different ways of accentuation are understood, the class to which a given position belongs may be readily determined. The modes of accentuation adopted, impart to the various manual positions something more than mere arbitrary class distinction. A hint at the physiological differences between consonants, vowels, and glides also is given, when the positions that represent them are viewed from the index-finger side of the hand ..., according to the rules in this Manual. <p>Consonant positions are distinguished by having the breath phalanx of the thumb close to the plane of the palm and the accented fingers straightened. When the voice phalanx of the thumb is accented, it is never held in contact with an accented finger’s second, or with its terminal, phalanx. The Shut and Nasal positions under this class are the only positions which fail to have accented fingers. In reading a Consonant position we begin at the index-finger side of the hand and treat as accented the nearest straightened finger, and also all other straightened fingers which are directly or indirectly in contact therewith; and as unaccented, all fingers which are closed, and also all straightened fingers which are out of contact with an accented finger. There are fifty-two Consonant positions.

Physiological Bases of the Visible Speech Symbols for Consonants

Physiological Bases of the Visible Speech Symbols - Consonants. In representing the consonant a peculiar…

Physiological Bases of the Visible Speech Symbols - Vowels. In representing the vowel classification of sounds, a peculiar and exclusive mode of accenting ... the important ... parts of the hand is resorted to, so that, when the different ways of accentuation are understood, the class to which a given position belongs may be readily determined. The modes of accentuation adopted, impart to the various manual positions something more than mere arbitrary class distinction. A hint at the physiological differences between consonants, vowels, and glides also is given, when the positions that represent them are viewed from the index-finger side of the hand ..., according to the rules in this Manual. <p>Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. The Vowel position are thirty-six in number.

Physiological Bases of the Visible Speech Symbols for Vowels

Physiological Bases of the Visible Speech Symbols - Vowels. In representing the vowel classification…

Gulliver shows the Lilliputians his gold pocketwatch. Never seeing anything like it before they believed it to be a God.

Pocketwatch

Gulliver shows the Lilliputians his gold pocketwatch. Never seeing anything like it before they believed…

This illustration shows a glove of the present day.

Present Day (20th Century) Glove

This illustration shows a glove of the present day.

An illustration of two men shaking hands and kissing each other's cheeks

Shaking Hands

An illustration of two men shaking hands and kissing each other's cheeks

"The workmen all their master will obey, / They plane and saw, and dare not stop to play; / Each boy and man the master keeps in view, / His eye does more than both his hands can do."&mdash;barber, 1857

The Eye of the Master Does More Work than Both His Hands

"The workmen all their master will obey, / They plane and saw, and dare not stop to play; / Each boy…

The short, thick, finger of the human hand, or the corresponding member of animals.

Thumb

The short, thick, finger of the human hand, or the corresponding member of animals.

The upper extremity of the human body. 1: Clavicle; 2: Scapula; 3: Humerus; 4: Ulna; 5: Radius; 6: Carpus; 7: Metacarpal; 8: Phalanges.

Upper Extremity

The upper extremity of the human body. 1: Clavicle; 2: Scapula; 3: Humerus; 4: Ulna; 5: Radius; 6: Carpus;…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Round Front Primary Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Mid Vowels have the center finger accented.

Round Front Primary Mid Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Round Front Wide Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." Mid Vowels have the center finger accented.

Round Front Wide Mid Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Mixed Vowels have the palm thrown forward so as to assume a compromising position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Round Mixed Primary Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Mixed Vowels have the palm thrown forward so as to assume a compromising position. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Round Mixed Wide Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Back Vowels have the palm in the posterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. High Vowels have the third finger accented

Normal Aperture Back Primary High Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Back Vowels have the palm in the posterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Normal Aperture Back Primary Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Back Vowels have the palm in the posterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Mid Vowels have the center finger accented.

Normal Aperture Back Primary Mid Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Back Vowels have the palm in the posterior position. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." High Vowels have the third finger accented

Normal Aperture Back Wide High Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Back Vowels have the palm in the posterior position. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Normal Aperture Back Wide Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Back Vowels have the palm in the posterior position. Wide Vowel positions differ from analogous Primary Vowel positions by having straightened unaccented fingers, to denote "Wide." Mid Vowels have the center finger accented.

Normal Aperture Back Wide Mid Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. High Vowels have the third finger accented

Normal Aperture Front Primary High Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Low Vowels have the first or index finger accented.

Normal Aperture Front Primary Low Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation. &hellip; in representing vowels the hand suggests a wide and firm channel, by having the accented finger bent and its terminal phalanx brought firmly in contact with the terminal phalanx of the thumb. <p> Vowel positions are distinguished by always having the voice phalanx of the thumb accented and in contact with the terminal phalanx of the accented finger. This kind of accent is the strongest which can be given a finger, and so always takes precedence. Two modes of accentuation may not co-exist. Front Vowels have the palm in the anterior position. In Primary Vowel positions the accented voice phalanx of the thumb and the terminal phalanx of the accented finger overlap. None of the unaccented fingers are straightened. Mid Vowels have the center finger accented.

Normal Aperture Front Primary Mid Vowel

Vowels have a wide, firm, and free channel, whereby the breath is modified without friction or sibilation.…