Heraldry representing the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Edinburgh

Heraldry representing the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

The heraldic shield of King Edward I of England, reigning from 1272 to 1307.

Shield of Edward I

The heraldic shield of King Edward I of England, reigning from 1272 to 1307.

The heraldic shield of King Edward III of England.

Shield of Edward III

The heraldic shield of King Edward III of England.

The heraldic badge of Edward V, the king of England in 1483.

Badge of Edward V

The heraldic badge of Edward V, the king of England in 1483.

An elliptical shape of a shield or escutcheon in heraldry.

Elliptical Shield

An elliptical shape of a shield or escutcheon in heraldry.

Mayster Elwett of Yorke chyre in a 15th-century roll bears Silver a saltire of chains sable with a crescent in the chiefe

Elwett

Mayster Elwett of Yorke chyre in a 15th-century roll bears Silver a saltire of chains sable with a crescent…

The shield is silver or argent and the red or gules chevron is enarched or rounded. "Argent, a Chevron Enarched Gules." -Whitney, 1911

Enarched Chevron

The shield is silver or argent and the red or gules chevron is enarched or rounded. "Argent, a Chevron…

"Argent, a pale between two endorses, gules. The pale has another diminutive one fourth its size; it is called an endorse." -Hall, 1862

Endorses and Pale

"Argent, a pale between two endorses, gules. The pale has another diminutive one fourth its size; it…

The herald for England bore Gulles three lions' legs razed silver, the paws downward. With the strange bearing of the lions whip-like tail cut-off at the rump

England

The herald for England bore Gulles three lions' legs razed silver, the paws downward. With the strange…

On an argent (silver) background, an engrailed gules (red) bend (diagonal band)."Engrailed. In heraldry, cut into concave semicircular indents." -Whitney, 1911

Engrailed Bend

On an argent (silver) background, an engrailed gules (red) bend (diagonal band). "Engrailed. In heraldry,…

"Argent (silver), a heart gules (red), ensigned with a royal crown.In heraldry, to distinguish (a charge) by a mark or an ornament, as a crown, coronet, or miter." -Whitney, 1911

Ensign

"Argent (silver), a heart gules (red), ensigned with a royal crown. In heraldry, to distinguish (a charge)…

"A Lion's Head Erased. In heraldry, represented as having been forcibly torn off, the separated parts being left jagged, as opposed to couped." -Whitney, 1911

Erased

"A Lion's Head Erased. In heraldry, represented as having been forcibly torn off, the separated parts…

"In heraldry, one of the furs, represented with its peculiar spots black on a white ground (argent, spots sable)." -Whitney, 1911

Ermine

"In heraldry, one of the furs, represented with its peculiar spots black on a white ground (argent,…

"In heraldry, a fur of a black ground with white spots (sable, spots argent): reverse of ermine. Also called counter-ermine, contre-ermine." -Whitney, 1911

Ermines

"In heraldry, a fur of a black ground with white spots (sable, spots argent): reverse of ermine. Also…

"In heraldry, a fur of a tincture resembling ermine, except that the ground is or (gold)." -Whitney, 1911

Erminois

"In heraldry, a fur of a tincture resembling ermine, except that the ground is or (gold)." -Whitney,…

Erpingham bore Vert a scocheon silver with an orle or border) of silver martlets

Erpingham

Erpingham bore Vert a scocheon silver with an orle or border) of silver martlets

"In heraldry, represented as covered with escallop- or scallop-shells: said of the field; also, covered with an imbricated pattern of curving lines." -Whitney, 1911

Escalloped

"In heraldry, represented as covered with escallop- or scallop-shells: said of the field; also, covered…

"ESCALOP. The shell of a sea-fish, used to decorate the palmers on their way to and from Palestine; frequently used as a charge in Heraldry." -Hall, 1862

Escalop

"ESCALOP. The shell of a sea-fish, used to decorate the palmers on their way to and from Palestine;…

"ESCUTCHEON. This word is sometimes used to express the whole coat of arms, sometimes only the field upon which the arms are painted. It more generally denotes the painted shields used at funerals. The field, if the husband is dead and wife survives, is black on the dexter side only; if the wife is deceased, it is black on the sinister side; if both, it is black all over. The example shows that this is the escutcheon of a deceased baron, whose lady survives." -Hall, 1862

Escutcheon

"ESCUTCHEON. This word is sometimes used to express the whole coat of arms, sometimes only the field…

"Argent, a chevron or, between three crosslets sable, on the fess point surtout the chevron an escutcheon of pretence gules, three quatrefoils argent. ESCUTCHEON OF PRETENCE. A small escutcheon, on which a man bears the coat of arms of his wife, being an heiress." -Hall, 1862

Escutcheon of Pretence

"Argent, a chevron or, between three crosslets sable, on the fess point surtout the chevron an escutcheon…

"The Helm of Esquires and Gentlemen has the vizor closed, and is placed in profile."—Aveling, 1891

Helm of Esquire

"The Helm of Esquires and Gentlemen has the vizor closed, and is placed in profile."—Aveling,…

"Gules, an estoile argent," or a silver star on a red background. -Whitney, 1911

Estoile

"Gules, an estoile argent," or a silver star on a red background. -Whitney, 1911

"ETOILE. The French word for a star. It differs from the mullet in the number of points, and four of the points being rayant." -Hall, 1862

Etoile

"ETOILE. The French word for a star. It differs from the mullet in the number of points, and four of…

Ever or Eure bore quarterly gold and gules with the addition of a bend sable with three silver scallops thereon.

Ever

Ever or Eure bore quarterly gold and gules with the addition of a bend sable with three silver scallops…

The shield of a knight of the time of Edward II. The lion's face is a common charge in heraldry.

Heraldic Shield with a Lion's Face

The shield of a knight of the time of Edward II. The lion's face is a common charge in heraldry.

Fauconer bore Silver three falcons gules.

Fauconer

Fauconer bore Silver three falcons gules.

Filbrigge of Fillbrigge bore Gold a leaping lion gules

Felbrigge

Filbrigge of Fillbrigge bore Gold a leaping lion gules

Fenwick bore Silver a chiefe gules with six martlets countercoloured

Fenwick

Fenwick bore Silver a chiefe gules with six martlets countercoloured

Ferlington bore Gules three pales vair and a chiefe gold

Ferlington

Ferlington bore Gules three pales vair and a chiefe gold

"Argent, a fess gules. FESS. An honourable ordinary occupying the third part of the shield between the centre and the base." -Hall, 1862

Fess

"Argent, a fess gules. FESS. An honourable ordinary occupying the third part of the shield between the…

"Argent, a fess gules, embattled grady. EMBATTLED GRADY. Where the battlements gradually rise one above another." -Hall, 1862

Fess Embattled Grady

"Argent, a fess gules, embattled grady. EMBATTLED GRADY. Where the battlements gradually rise one above…

"Argent, a fess humetty gules, between three mullets sable. HUMETTY. A term used to denote an ordinary, parts of which are couped or cut off, so that it does not touch the edges of the shield." -Hall, 1862

Fess Humetty

"Argent, a fess humetty gules, between three mullets sable. HUMETTY. A term used to denote an ordinary,…

"FESS POINT. The exact centre of the escutcheon, as seen in the annexed example." -Hall, 1862

Fess Point

"FESS POINT. The exact centre of the escutcheon, as seen in the annexed example." -Hall, 1862

Gules, two bars, argent. The bar is formed in the same manner as the fess, but it only occupies the fifth part of the field. It differs from the fess, that ordinary being always placed in the centre of the field; but the bar may be placed in any part of it, and there may be more than one bar in an escutcheon. -Hall, 1862

Shield Showing Fess

Gules, two bars, argent. The bar is formed in the same manner as the fess, but it only occupies the…

Fiennes bore Azure three lions gold.

Fiennes

Fiennes bore Azure three lions gold.

"Or, a chief, purpure, in the lower part a fillet, azure. The chief has a diminutive called a fillet; it must never be more than one fourth the breadth of the chief." -Hall, 1862

Fillet and Chief

"Or, a chief, purpure, in the lower part a fillet, azure. The chief has a diminutive called a fillet;…

Fishacre bore Gules a dolphin silver.

Fishacre

Fishacre bore Gules a dolphin silver.

Fitzalan, earl of Arundel bore Gules a lion gold.

Fitzalan

Fitzalan, earl of Arundel bore Gules a lion gold.

Fitzwilliam bore Lozengy silver and gules

Fitzwilliam

Fitzwilliam bore Lozengy silver and gules

"Azure, a flanche, argent. The flanche is formed by two curved lines nearly touching each other in the centre of the shield." -Hall, 1862

Flanche Ordinary

"Azure, a flanche, argent. The flanche is formed by two curved lines nearly touching each other in the…

"Azure, a flasque, argent. In the flasque the curved lines do not approach so near each other." -Hall, 1862

Flasque Ordinary

"Azure, a flasque, argent. In the flasque the curved lines do not approach so near each other." -Hall,…

Or flaunches gules. A gold shield charged with red flaunches.

Flanuched Gules

Or flaunches gules. A gold shield charged with red flaunches.

"The fleur de lis of Louis VII." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Fleur de lis

"The fleur de lis of Louis VII." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

A flower symbol used as a charge in heraldry, often seen as a stylized lily.

Fleur-de-Lis

A flower symbol used as a charge in heraldry, often seen as a stylized lily.

A flower symbol used as a charge in heraldry, often seen as a stylized lily.

Fleur-de-Lis

A flower symbol used as a charge in heraldry, often seen as a stylized lily.

A flower symbol used as a charge in heraldry, often seen as a stylized lily.

Fleur-de-Lis

A flower symbol used as a charge in heraldry, often seen as a stylized lily.

"FLEUR-DE-LIS. Supposed to represent the garden-lily. It is the bearing of the Bourbons of France, but is frequently introduced in English charges." -Hall, 1862

Fleur-de-Lis

"FLEUR-DE-LIS. Supposed to represent the garden-lily. It is the bearing of the Bourbons of France, but…

"Sixth Son, the FLEUR-DE-LIS. The differences used by armorists at the present time are nine in number. They not only distinguish the sons of one family, but also denote the subordinate degrees in each house." -Hall, 1862

Fleur-De-Lis Difference

"Sixth Son, the FLEUR-DE-LIS. The differences used by armorists at the present time are nine in number.…

The heraldic charge borne by the sixth eldest son in a family.

The Fleur-de-lis

The heraldic charge borne by the sixth eldest son in a family.

Fotheringhay bore Silver two lions passant sable, looking backward.

Fotheringhay

Fotheringhay bore Silver two lions passant sable, looking backward.

Fauconberg bore Gold a fesse azure with three pales gules in the chiefe

Fauconberg

Fauconberg bore Gold a fesse azure with three pales gules in the chiefe

"A roundel, barry wavy of six argent and azure, or more rarely having a greater number of barrulets." -Whitney, 1911

Fountain Charge

"A roundel, barry wavy of six argent and azure, or more rarely having a greater number of barrulets."…

"Argent, two foxes counter salient. COUNTER SALIENT. Two animals leaping different ways from each other." -Hall, 1862

Foxes Counter Salient

"Argent, two foxes counter salient. COUNTER SALIENT. Two animals leaping different ways from each other."…

Adam Fraunceys (14th century) bore Party gold and sable bendwise with a lion countercoloured. The parting line is here commonly shown as sinister

Fraunceys

Adam Fraunceys (14th century) bore Party gold and sable bendwise with a lion countercoloured. The parting…

"Azure, a fret argent. FRET. Two laths interlaced with a mascle." -Hall, 1862

Fret

"Azure, a fret argent. FRET. Two laths interlaced with a mascle." -Hall, 1862

"Azure, a fret, argent. The fret is formed by two lines interlaced in saltier with a mascle." -Hall, 1862

Fret Ordinary

"Azure, a fret, argent. The fret is formed by two lines interlaced in saltier with a mascle." -Hall,…

"Gules, fretty argent. FRETTY. This word denotes a field covered with fretwork or laths interlacing each other." -Hall, 1862

Fretty

"Gules, fretty argent. FRETTY. This word denotes a field covered with fretwork or laths interlacing…

"Gules, fretty of ten pieces, argent. Fretty is when the shield is covered with lines crossing each other diagonally and interlaced." -Hall, 1862

Fretty Ordinary

"Gules, fretty of ten pieces, argent. Fretty is when the shield is covered with lines crossing each…

"The black is left on the dexter side, showing that the husband is deceased, and that his wife survives him." -Hall, 1862

Funeral Atchievement

"The black is left on the dexter side, showing that the husband is deceased, and that his wife survives…

The image "shows that the husband survives the wife." -Hall, 1862

Funeral Atchievement

The image "shows that the husband survives the wife." -Hall, 1862