"But, suppose the same bar or iron, whose inertia was overcome by raising the centre, to have balls of different weights attached to its ends; then the centre of inertia would no longer remain in the middle of the bar, but would be changed to the point A..." -Comstock 1850

Center of Inertia

"But, suppose the same bar or iron, whose inertia was overcome by raising the centre, to have balls…

"On the top of a short pillar is placed a card, and on the card a brass bal. Beside the pillar is fixed a steel spring, with an apparatus for drawing it back. If the spring is drawn back and the suddenly released, it will drive the card from the top of the pillar, while the ball in consequence of its inertia will retain its place." —Quackenbos 1859

Inertia Demonstration

"On the top of a short pillar is placed a card, and on the card a brass bal. Beside the pillar is fixed…

"... balance a card with a penny placed upon it on the tip of one of the fingers of the left hand, and strike it suddenly with the middle finger of the right hand, as represented [here]." —Quackenbos 1859

Inertia Demonstration

"... balance a card with a penny placed upon it on the tip of one of the fingers of the left hand, and…

"While his horse is going at full speed, he jumps over a rope extended across the ring, and regains his footing on the saddle without difficultly. To do this, he has only to leap straight up as he comes to the rope, for his inertia bears him along in the same direction as the horse." —Quackenbos 1859

Inertia Demonstration

"While his horse is going at full speed, he jumps over a rope extended across the ring, and regains…

"... a thin stick resting on two wine glasses may be broken by a quick blow with a poker in its centre (sic), without injury to its brittle supports." —Quackenbos 1859

Inertia Demonstration

"... a thin stick resting on two wine glasses may be broken by a quick blow with a poker in its centre…

"So a hare, in making for cover, often escapes a hound by making a number of quick turns. The greater inertia of the hound carries him to far, and thus obliges him to pass over a greater space, as seen [here], in which the continuous line shows the hare's path and the dotted line the hound's." —Quackenbos 1859

Inertia Demonstration

"So a hare, in making for cover, often escapes a hound by making a number of quick turns. The greater…