Kentucky blue-grass, grown from a single seed. Strongly stoloniferous.

Kentucky bue-grass

Kentucky blue-grass, grown from a single seed. Strongly stoloniferous.

A closer view of a stalk of Kentucky blue-grass.

Kentucky blue-grass

A closer view of a stalk of Kentucky blue-grass.

Boone first reached Kentucky in the fall of 1767 when on a long hunt with his brother Squire Boone, Jr.

Daniel Boone's First Sight of Kentucky

Boone first reached Kentucky in the fall of 1767 when on a long hunt with his brother Squire Boone,…

Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail into central Kentucky and built Fort Boone, soon renamed Boonesborough.

Boone's Fort

Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail into central Kentucky and built Fort Boone, soon renamed Boonesborough.

(1734-1820) American pioneer and hunter.

Daniel Boone

(1734-1820) American pioneer and hunter.

(1793-1881) — of Kentucky. Born in 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1846-47.

Leslie Combs

(1793-1881) — of Kentucky. Born in 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Speaker of…

John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786 - July 26, 1863) was an American statesman from Kentucky. He twice served as United States Attorney General. He represented Kentucky in both houses of Congress and served as the state's seventeenth governor.

John Jordan Crittenden

John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786 - July 26, 1863) was an American statesman from Kentucky.…

The first permanent state house in Frankfort, Kentucky.

First State House, Frankfort, KY

The first permanent state house in Frankfort, Kentucky.

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Hand with Gun

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Kentucky in 1889.

Kentucky

The official seal of the U.S. state of Kentucky in 1889.

The United States seal of Kentucky in 1792.

Kentucky

The United States seal of Kentucky in 1792.

The state banner of Kentucky, the blue grass state.

Kentucky

The state banner of Kentucky, the blue grass state.

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1881

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1881

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1890

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1890

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1904

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1904

Lincoln's birthplace in Hardin County, Kentucky.

Lincoln's birthplace

Lincoln's birthplace in Hardin County, Kentucky.

The birthplace of Abraham Lincoln in Hardin County, Kentucky.

Lincoln's Birthplace

The birthplace of Abraham Lincoln in Hardin County, Kentucky.

The entrance to Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

Mammoth Cave

The entrance to Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

A scene of Perryville, Kentucky.

Perryville

A scene of Perryville, Kentucky.

First Governor of Kentucky

Isaac Shelby

First Governor of Kentucky

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

The deck plan of the U.S.S. Kentucky.

U.S.S. Kentucky

The deck plan of the U.S.S. Kentucky.